Best Partitons for Future upgrades and to install bunch of softwares

[email protected]

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Hello everyone, can anyone recommend me a partition especially for installing many softwares(not lot I mean few with huge storage space) and also upgrading my distro without losing any of my files and installed softwares. I have a 500GB HDD and Iam planning to buy an SSD also. And also I read few threads saying that installing linux on SSD causes issues and will not be able to boot and work properly. Is that true?

Thank you in advance.
 


Alexzee

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Hello everyone, can anyone recommend me a partition especially for installing many softwares(not lot I mean few with huge storage space) and also upgrading my distro without losing any of my files and installed softwares. I have a 500GB HDD and Iam planning to buy an SSD also. And also I read few threads saying that installing linux on SSD causes issues and will not be able to boot and work properly. Is that true?

Thank you in advance.
I personally don't do upgrades because any time that I did things did not go well and the gui didn't perform correctly. IMO fresh installations are best.
Other members may have other ideas and practices for upgrading. I don't.

You could make a separate partition for installing all of your software if you like.

So you have a 500 GB HDD and you'll be purchasing an SSD too.
That's all good.

I take it this is a desktop pc?

I've installed Linux on many SSD's and never had a problem with booting.

When you have more than one drive with Linux installed you have to update the bootloader in order for Grub to give you the option of which os to choose from.
Not updating Grub can make it so that you won't see the other os to boot into.

So, as long as you do the right thing with Grub your SSD should boot w/o any problems.

Is your pc a UEFI machine?
 

[email protected]

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Ok, So thank you for the details you have provided me. But can I just spend some of my space in drive for swap partition? I read that it acts like a virtual RAM. Is that true?

If that's true we can just spend a very few bucks on RAM and just increase the swap partition for more faster Desktop(Indirectly). Will any problems arise when doing that?

I have a BIOS firmware in my Desktop BTW.
 

wizardfromoz

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I am going to ruffle a few feathers here, perhaps. :p

G'day @[email protected]

Questions for you are -
  1. Are you still using POP OS 20.04? and
  2. How much RAM do you have currently?

But can I just spend some of my space in drive for swap partition?
Chances are, you won't need it.

In your Linux Distro, open Terminal and type in and enter the following

Code:
dmesg | grep -i swap
and report back with the output it generates.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 

jglen490

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First, SSDs are not a problem with Linux or anything else. That being said, like anything else understand that quality does make a difference, so stick with name brands. You can find name brands that are not expensive.

Next, a typical basic Linux installation with routine software (browser, email, office, multimedia) is going to come in at about 7 - 8GB. If you have a lot of ebooks, music, videos, and other personal data, those things do not count in that 7 - 8GB because of where Linux typically puts such things.

So it comes down to partitioning schemes, backup and recovery, and flexibility. This is my opinion, but it has worked very well for a long time; make / and /home separate partitions. The partitions can be on the same disk or on separate disks, but since you are planning on two disks, then using each to house separate partitions will make sense.

I will give you an example with my layout:
Code:
[email protected]:~$ lsblk -f
NAME   FSTYPE LABEL UUID                                 FSAVAIL FSUSE% MOUNTPOINT
sda                                                                    
├─sda1 vfat         FEDE-EAB1                             467.3M     2% /boot/efi
├─sda2 ext4         23826d99-a20c-4578-be01-bcfdb11e4a0e   21.6G    27% /
├─sda3 ext4         3f50c05b-b795-43fe-b0cb-93984f7eaf65  162.5G     0% /home/extra
└─sda4 swap         775ceb26-36e8-4d6c-9b45-e0a1ea0d208f                [SWAP]
sdb                                                                    
└─sdb1 ext4         97534121-229e-4d67-921f-fd05ed312100  246.6G    41% /home
sr0                                                                    
[email protected]:~$
I have two disks, sda and sdb, sr0 being a DVD drive (not used much).
The sda disk is a 240GB SSD and has four partitions:
  1. efi, since I use UEFI, this is where the GRUB boot files go;
  2. a 32GB / where software gets installed (21.6GB free space);
  3. an extension of /home for extras space (not currently used);
  4. and dedicated SWAP (about 16GB).
The sdb disk is a 500GB SSD and has one partition, /home where the config files for my use of the installed software and my data (videos, music, email, office, etc.) and it is only half used.

I backup /home routinely to external drives. I have a set of four 320GB spinners, that I use so that at any time I have four individual backups to recover from, if needed.

I use Kubuntu, and only the LTS versions. I do a clean install when it's time to go from one LTS to the next. Once it was set up, it became super-easy to manage, is typically very stable, and in the few times I've needed to fix problems this has been very easy to fix.
 
Last edited:

wizardfromoz

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While we are waiting for the OP to get back to us ...

@jglen490 - John you might want to run that dmesg command yourself.

Swap is way overrated, and almost every Linux released in the last 3 years already has inbuilt swap of 1 - 2 GB, or a similar component, known as zswap, which compressed and can expand when needed.

I won't go into the details here, but will start a Thread soon, but in the interim, I'll provide my lsblk output, and my inxi specs for this rig, that runs 56 Distros.

[email protected]:~
$ lsblk -f
NAME FSTYPE LABEL UUID FSAVAIL FSUSE% MOUNTPOINT
sda
├─sda1
│ vfat D1A8-121E
├─sda2
│ ext4 Timeshift-SSD
│ 0f63c02c-f82b-4afd-9a41-e042859c8a68
├─sda3
│ ext4 Timeshift-WD
│ 475659ff-6fcb-41f3-9b69-d80b6c6fa2a3
├─sda4
│ ext4 Timeshift-HDD
│ 2a13d1be-e8e9-4986-bace-ca72c733443d
├─sda5
│ ext4 Tina-Xfce-HDD
│ 375a8ef7-402a-4658-85e6-8079c278bbdc
├─sda6
│ ext4 LXLE18.04-HDD
│ f4ef1437-7f73-4a28-b9bd-d9030aed371e
├─sda7
│ ext4 TessaCinnamonHDD
│ 068c78b8-aca6-4a01-bd76-eb0878dd654d
├─sda8
│ ext4 MJRO-GNOME-HDD
│ e5a2cc40-0196-444a-bf0b-6c31480b53e0
├─sda9
│ ext4 EndeavourOS-HDD
│ afa44d4f-3c66-48af-9d0c-27720bd78704
├─sda10
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ 3cbc9d33-08aa-4685-9182-f2e55fbbc026
├─sda11
│ ext4 ArcolinuxXfceHDD
│ ba05f70e-1562-4063-a63a-19c946b74278
├─sda12
│ ext4 SonyaCinnamonHDD
│ fa87f137-696d-4fd6-9c75-287ae98e33a6
├─sda13
│ ext4 XubuntuFocal-HDD
│ df17b2c7-61f8-436a-bfc3-7541b83c82c1
├─sda14
│ ext4 TriciaXfce-HDD
│ 5666189f-0fe9-4c23-961e-498abad94b1c
├─sda15
│ ext4 LMDE-Debbie-HDD
│ 459fcd6c-ccc9-4f2f-8b07-c1558d763870
├─sda16
│ ext4 Robolinux-HDD
│ 67a35b92-e06d-4d72-ae59-e20026ed92b0
├─sda17
│ ext4 Ulyana-Xfce-HDD
│ 9f26db0e-8f15-4806-b977-857fc7aa7b7b
├─sda18
│ ext4 FutureLinux
│ fcdcda84-b981-41b6-b7ce-ed4f2d0b69de
├─sda19
│ ext4 Kali-HDD
│ f769ba76-c9d7-4660-aa5a-0c1093c31da6
├─sda20
│ ext4 SparkyGameOverHD
│ 0c806684-2b7d-4334-b7c8-954009bba088
├─sda21
│ ext4 GeckoLeap152Cinn
│ eb6bfe97-3dc3-413f-a500-e8c242c25050
├─sda22
│ ext4 antiX19.2
│ 0f8678a6-80e4-44a2-b00a-69a3ed11892b
├─sda23
│ ext4 KDE-Neon-HDD
│ 44535c7b-4c8a-4ab3-9c6d-6d251efa15a3
├─sda24
│ ext4 Fedora32Xfce-HDD
│ a5e5209f-226d-4fb8-a18b-d97fe8d6edbb
├─sda25
│ ext4 LL5.0-UEFI-HDD
│ cbe40c44-732c-4af7-9b09-bd873d67a859
├─sda26
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ 3cad79ae-771c-4a83-8ce8-2640da9871d6
└─sda27
ext4 2wayAdataDocs
8e83fdce-1f45-47ea-8fe1-94d25dcb44da
sdb
├─sdb1
│ ext4 FocalGNOME-SSD
│ 3a2c1601-69ba-42cb-9415-8045e2915994
├─sdb2
│ vfat DEA8-841B 467.1M 9% /boot/efi
├─sdb3
│ ext4 Pep10-Respin-SSD
│ 8641f2d5-af20-4fb4-b90c-7559f1c5b477
├─sdb4
│ ext4 MJRO-Xfce-SSD
│ a27c129a-48b7-4158-8165-27756f6736cf
├─sdb5
│ ext4 MJRO-KDE-SSD
│ 04f35396-2f79-4d56-a1f0-312f6713d408
├─sdb6
│ ext4 Tricia-Cinn-SSD
│ 1febdf78-53a6-4d8f-99a8-278998a48696
├─sdb7
│ ext4 Ulyana-MATE-SSD
│ 94396da9-7146-4cd4-a517-3733944d71d2
├─sdb8
│ ext4 Ulyana-Cinn-SSD
│ 855b1635-ac17-42e0-872f-93826b713d02
├─sdb9
│ ext4 TriciaMATE-SSD
│ 37784964-76ce-49cc-afac-bc86fcd73ab6
├─sdb10
│ ext4 MX-19.1-SSD
│ 37495e24-aaf6-4cf8-9b53-c892e940cf2f 5.2G 59% /
├─sdb11
│ ext4 ArchmanXfce-SSD
│ 431c18da-f72d-4216-8849-83a5778539fc
├─sdb12
│ ext4 LM20Cinn-Testing
│ 8fd66a7c-77ba-4e43-a64a-5e9e60a0b945
├─sdb13
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ dc25dc19-bf28-4f07-adb1-43a5b8f6f584
├─sdb14
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ 008c1f61-f402-4a37-ab82-f6bdee72f07e
└─sdb15
ext4 FocalMATE-SSD
c417295f-b40a-4a1c-ae73-2a425b1144d6
sdc
├─sdc1
│ ext4 TaraMATE-WD
│ abe6c84c-ebd5-46b7-a7d9-a8be3fa527a6
├─sdc2
│ vfat ESP 024B-FCE8
├─sdc3
│ ext4 TinaCinnamon-WD
│ 6e5896b3-0ac9-4767-ba0e-76e62b47191d
├─sdc4
│ ext4 LinuxLiteUEFI-WD
│ 5d1482f2-f038-4477-a4a9-074ae86e3826
├─sdc5
│ ext4 MJRO18.4-Xfce-WD
│ 2802ee45-58d5-44f2-bf0f-7283b33e20bd
├─sdc6
│ ext4 ZorinOS-15-WD
│ c9ab907a-aaea-4441-946a-e346ac4ace31
├─sdc7
│ ext4 LMDE-Cindy-WD
│ f800b5e1-1d18-4df3-a873-cef51959d799
├─sdc8
│ ext4 Zorin12.4-WD
│ 6a04d911-62dc-4b47-bac9-e37f02ad1420
├─sdc9
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ a8ea3da4-9d27-4a4b-8e04-ba309d8633a7
├─sdc10
│ ext4 MJRO-Cinn-WD
│ 394c75db-d300-4b79-b9b8-21e9997e884a
├─sdc11
│ ext4 Peppermint9-WD
│ d73ca984-73c6-4b74-991d-7c3e7dbda5d7
├─sdc12
│ ext4 Debian9.8MATE-WD
│ 4db7343a-0b8c-47eb-8f04-923172e17d1f
├─sdc13
│ ext4 Tara-Xfce-WD
│ f641a844-b1ee-41da-a713-916010f4e1d3
├─sdc14
│ ext4 ArcolinuxCinn-WD
│ a0538838-1787-4fcf-8281-5e31365ff780
├─sdc15
│ ext4 TessaMATE-WD
│ 442bedc2-3f4f-43fc-888a-55321fc3be16
├─sdc16
│ ext4 ElementaryOSJuno
│ 2fd8e645-554d-4cec-a9fc-855c8a116349
├─sdc17
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ 17c96be0-7db7-42e4-9ab8-8c9754e73d58
├─sdc18
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ 53dfd40a-af89-4abb-89f4-b55335d14645
├─sdc19
│ ext4 PeachOSI-TW-WD
│ 431987af-b3c5-48a5-af9c-f16823fa60d5
├─sdc20
│ ext4 MJRO-DEEPIN-WD
│ b2473640-cae3-43dd-8d56-9e21573af00e
├─sdc21
│ ext4 DistroReady-40GB
│ ba340f88-7f63-49b8-9d1a-e5c1d37864e6
├─sdc22
│ ext4 PeachPatriot-WD
│ e7069023-2661-4111-a6b2-a63e6e893f65
├─sdc23
│ ext4 BionicGNOME-WD
│ 00ad9fb1-d6ee-4c2d-aa15-83218878f5dc
├─sdc24
│ ext4 BionicMATE-WD
│ 8ab2aaf8-fb92-4e58-a98c-31f46a601856
├─sdc25
│ ext4 Swagarch
│ ba0ababc-a76c-4b94-9774-9d5450cdf5d2
├─sdc26
│ ext4 Peppermint10-WD
│ 7c15308c-fbac-4ec7-90ca-d313d81da7e7
├─sdc27
│ ext4 SylviaCinnamonWD
│ 5999de8e-97ea-4bd9-bec8-3b000ecf5926
├─sdc28
│ ext4 MJRO-MATE-WD
│ 58c5f278-e6b9-49cc-ab90-e100261da3c2
├─sdc29
│ ext4 4VMs-WD
│ 4e5bccbe-13f5-4842-9fb4-7cfe674cd29e
├─sdc30
│ ext4 TaraCinnamon-WD
│ e733a334-31a5-4a6e-953b-d781f6d92fed
├─sdc31
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ 0aa7afd2-1b94-4ea9-bbc8-0335bdbd0f90
├─sdc32
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ 698cdcd6-9f40-4ec0-b75e-b90664979705
├─sdc33
│ ext4 EmmabuntusDE2-WD
│ ec04acab-4ed6-47ed-90f2-f588b89d5902
├─sdc34
│ ext4 BunsenlabsHelium
│ 19180b3c-4f8b-4f80-8a15-a1aacc1b5712
├─sdc35
│ ext4 SerenaCinn-WD
│ cd9184c4-7920-410d-bec6-2dfa26f51007
├─sdc36
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ 1c2a20da-d564-472a-b83a-6e07bfaac246
├─sdc37
│ ext4 Pop!_OS-WD
│ a893774c-3814-4988-a3a3-1b388bacf150
├─sdc38
│ ext4 DistroReady30GB
│ 71d9d7fc-f6c0-4c69-959f-090b66341d66
├─sdc39
│ ext4 TimeshiftSabayon
│ 47807461-b32a-42b9-8b0a-7231c0bac96a
├─sdc40
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ de999d74-a68f-4c73-89dd-3463fc36e892
├─sdc41
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ cc3eacee-8d3b-44e3-8b3f-bc749c8ad986
├─sdc43
│ ext4 Ex-Adata-1
│ 12584a4b-2297-413c-b4f4-4cd97f533295
└─sdc47
ext4 Save-Doc-DL-VID
83579b75-e0dc-4af1-a8b5-e4a8eb8c56b6
sr0

and

[email protected]:~
$ inxi -Fxz
System:
Host: MX-19.1-SSD Kernel: 4.19.0-6-amd64 x86_64 bits: 64 compiler: gcc
v: 8.3.0 Desktop: Xfce 4.14.2
Distro: MX-19.2_x64 patito feo February 15 2020
base: Debian GNU/Linux 10 (buster)
Machine:
Type: Laptop System: Dell product: Inspiron 5770 v: N/A serial: <filter>
Mobo: Dell model: 0XH3XD v: A00 serial: <filter> UEFI: Dell v: 1.1.8
date: 08/15/2018
Battery:
ID-1: BAT0 charge: 38.3 Wh condition: 38.3/42.0 Wh (91%)
model: SMP DELL Y3F7Y6B status: Full
CPU:
Topology: Quad Core model: Intel Core i7-8550U bits: 64 type: MT MCP
arch: Kaby Lake rev: A L2 cache: 8192 KiB
flags: avx avx2 lm nx pae sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 ssse3 vmx
bogomips: 31872
Speed: 800 MHz min/max: 400/4000 MHz Core speeds (MHz): 1: 800 2: 800
3: 800 4: 800 5: 800 6: 800 7: 800 8: 800
Graphics:
Device-1: Intel UHD Graphics 620 vendor: Dell driver: i915 v: kernel
bus ID: 00:02.0
Device-2: AMD Topaz XT [Radeon R7 M260/M265 / M340/M360 / M440/M445]
vendor: Dell driver: amdgpu v: kernel bus ID: 01:00.0
Display: x11 server: X.Org 1.20.4 driver: amdgpu,ati,modesetting
unloaded: fbdev,vesa resolution: 1920x1080~60Hz
OpenGL: renderer: Mesa DRI Intel UHD Graphics 620 (Kabylake GT2)
v: 4.5 Mesa 18.3.6 direct render: Yes
Audio:
Device-1: Intel Sunrise Point-LP HD Audio vendor: Dell
driver: snd_hda_intel v: kernel bus ID: 00:1f.3
Sound Server: ALSA v: k4.19.0-6-amd64
Network:
Device-1: Realtek RTL8101/2/6E PCI Express Fast/Gigabit Ethernet
vendor: Dell RTL810xE driver: r8169 v: kernel port: d000 bus ID: 02:00.0
IF: eth0 state: down mac: <filter>
Device-2: Qualcomm Atheros QCA9377 802.11ac Wireless Network Adapter
vendor: Dell driver: ath10k_pci v: kernel port: d000 bus ID: 03:00.0
IF: wlan0 state: up mac: <filter>
Device-3: Qualcomm Atheros type: USB driver: btusb bus ID: 1-7:5
Drives:
Local Storage: total: 5.69 TiB used: 8.75 GiB (0.2%)
ID-1: /dev/sda vendor: Seagate model: ST2000LM007-1R8174 size: 1.82 TiB
ID-2: /dev/sdb vendor: Micron model: 1100 SATA 256GB size: 238.47 GiB
ID-3: /dev/sdc type: USB vendor: Western Digital model: WD My Book 25EE
size: 3.64 TiB
RAID:
Hardware-1: Intel 82801 Mobile SATA Controller [RAID mode] driver: ahci
v: 3.0 bus ID: 00:17.0
Partition:
ID-1: / size: 14.64 GiB used: 8.71 GiB (59.5%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sdb10
Sensors:
System Temperatures: cpu: 55.0 C mobo: 51.0 C sodimm: 53.0 C gpu: amdgpu
temp: 511 C
Fan Speeds (RPM): cpu: 3486
Info:
Processes: 247 Uptime: 5m Memory: 15.57 GiB used: 2.67 GiB (17.2%)
Init: SysVinit runlevel: 5 Compilers: gcc: 8.3.0 Shell: bash v: 5.0.3
inxi: 3.0.36

Cheers and

Avagudweegend

Wiz
 

f33dm3bits

Gold Member
Gold Supporter
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I find the best way to manage partitioning is to use LVM.
 

jglen490

Well-Known Member
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LVM has its disadvantages, also. To quote the Arch link:
Disadvantages

  • Additional steps in setting up the system, more complicated. Requires (multiple) daemons to constantly run.
  • If dual-booting, note that Windows does not support LVM; you will be unable to access any LVM partitions from Windows.
  • If your physical volumes are not on a RAID-1, RAID-5 or RAID-6 losing one disk can lose one or more logical volumes if you span (or extend) your logical volumes across multiple non-redundant disks.
For a small, single boot installation and usage pattern, LVM is not necessary and an unneeded complication. I would agree that for a large installation, especially something like an Enterprise, LVM would have a use case, but an appropriate RAID configuration would be better.
 

jglen490

Well-Known Member
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While we are waiting for the OP to get back to us ...

@jglen490 - John you might want to run that dmesg command yourself.

Swap is way overrated, and almost every Linux released in the last 3 years already has inbuilt swap of 1 - 2 GB, or a similar component, known as zswap, which compressed and can expand when needed.

I won't go into the details here, but will start a Thread soon, but in the interim, I'll provide my lsblk output, and my inxi specs for this rig, that runs 56 Distros.

[email protected]:~
$ lsblk -f
NAME FSTYPE LABEL UUID FSAVAIL FSUSE% MOUNTPOINT
sda
├─sda1
│ vfat D1A8-121E
├─sda2
│ ext4 Timeshift-SSD
│ 0f63c02c-f82b-4afd-9a41-e042859c8a68
├─sda3
│ ext4 Timeshift-WD
│ 475659ff-6fcb-41f3-9b69-d80b6c6fa2a3
├─sda4
│ ext4 Timeshift-HDD
│ 2a13d1be-e8e9-4986-bace-ca72c733443d
├─sda5
│ ext4 Tina-Xfce-HDD
│ 375a8ef7-402a-4658-85e6-8079c278bbdc
├─sda6
│ ext4 LXLE18.04-HDD
│ f4ef1437-7f73-4a28-b9bd-d9030aed371e
├─sda7
│ ext4 TessaCinnamonHDD
│ 068c78b8-aca6-4a01-bd76-eb0878dd654d
├─sda8
│ ext4 MJRO-GNOME-HDD
│ e5a2cc40-0196-444a-bf0b-6c31480b53e0
├─sda9
│ ext4 EndeavourOS-HDD
│ afa44d4f-3c66-48af-9d0c-27720bd78704
├─sda10
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ 3cbc9d33-08aa-4685-9182-f2e55fbbc026
├─sda11
│ ext4 ArcolinuxXfceHDD
│ ba05f70e-1562-4063-a63a-19c946b74278
├─sda12
│ ext4 SonyaCinnamonHDD
│ fa87f137-696d-4fd6-9c75-287ae98e33a6
├─sda13
│ ext4 XubuntuFocal-HDD
│ df17b2c7-61f8-436a-bfc3-7541b83c82c1
├─sda14
│ ext4 TriciaXfce-HDD
│ 5666189f-0fe9-4c23-961e-498abad94b1c
├─sda15
│ ext4 LMDE-Debbie-HDD
│ 459fcd6c-ccc9-4f2f-8b07-c1558d763870
├─sda16
│ ext4 Robolinux-HDD
│ 67a35b92-e06d-4d72-ae59-e20026ed92b0
├─sda17
│ ext4 Ulyana-Xfce-HDD
│ 9f26db0e-8f15-4806-b977-857fc7aa7b7b
├─sda18
│ ext4 FutureLinux
│ fcdcda84-b981-41b6-b7ce-ed4f2d0b69de
├─sda19
│ ext4 Kali-HDD
│ f769ba76-c9d7-4660-aa5a-0c1093c31da6
├─sda20
│ ext4 SparkyGameOverHD
│ 0c806684-2b7d-4334-b7c8-954009bba088
├─sda21
│ ext4 GeckoLeap152Cinn
│ eb6bfe97-3dc3-413f-a500-e8c242c25050
├─sda22
│ ext4 antiX19.2
│ 0f8678a6-80e4-44a2-b00a-69a3ed11892b
├─sda23
│ ext4 KDE-Neon-HDD
│ 44535c7b-4c8a-4ab3-9c6d-6d251efa15a3
├─sda24
│ ext4 Fedora32Xfce-HDD
│ a5e5209f-226d-4fb8-a18b-d97fe8d6edbb
├─sda25
│ ext4 LL5.0-UEFI-HDD
│ cbe40c44-732c-4af7-9b09-bd873d67a859
├─sda26
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ 3cad79ae-771c-4a83-8ce8-2640da9871d6
└─sda27
ext4 2wayAdataDocs
8e83fdce-1f45-47ea-8fe1-94d25dcb44da
sdb
├─sdb1
│ ext4 FocalGNOME-SSD
│ 3a2c1601-69ba-42cb-9415-8045e2915994
├─sdb2
│ vfat DEA8-841B 467.1M 9% /boot/efi
├─sdb3
│ ext4 Pep10-Respin-SSD
│ 8641f2d5-af20-4fb4-b90c-7559f1c5b477
├─sdb4
│ ext4 MJRO-Xfce-SSD
│ a27c129a-48b7-4158-8165-27756f6736cf
├─sdb5
│ ext4 MJRO-KDE-SSD
│ 04f35396-2f79-4d56-a1f0-312f6713d408
├─sdb6
│ ext4 Tricia-Cinn-SSD
│ 1febdf78-53a6-4d8f-99a8-278998a48696
├─sdb7
│ ext4 Ulyana-MATE-SSD
│ 94396da9-7146-4cd4-a517-3733944d71d2
├─sdb8
│ ext4 Ulyana-Cinn-SSD
│ 855b1635-ac17-42e0-872f-93826b713d02
├─sdb9
│ ext4 TriciaMATE-SSD
│ 37784964-76ce-49cc-afac-bc86fcd73ab6
├─sdb10
│ ext4 MX-19.1-SSD
│ 37495e24-aaf6-4cf8-9b53-c892e940cf2f 5.2G 59% /
├─sdb11
│ ext4 ArchmanXfce-SSD
│ 431c18da-f72d-4216-8849-83a5778539fc
├─sdb12
│ ext4 LM20Cinn-Testing
│ 8fd66a7c-77ba-4e43-a64a-5e9e60a0b945
├─sdb13
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ dc25dc19-bf28-4f07-adb1-43a5b8f6f584
├─sdb14
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ 008c1f61-f402-4a37-ab82-f6bdee72f07e
└─sdb15
ext4 FocalMATE-SSD
c417295f-b40a-4a1c-ae73-2a425b1144d6
sdc
├─sdc1
│ ext4 TaraMATE-WD
│ abe6c84c-ebd5-46b7-a7d9-a8be3fa527a6
├─sdc2
│ vfat ESP 024B-FCE8
├─sdc3
│ ext4 TinaCinnamon-WD
│ 6e5896b3-0ac9-4767-ba0e-76e62b47191d
├─sdc4
│ ext4 LinuxLiteUEFI-WD
│ 5d1482f2-f038-4477-a4a9-074ae86e3826
├─sdc5
│ ext4 MJRO18.4-Xfce-WD
│ 2802ee45-58d5-44f2-bf0f-7283b33e20bd
├─sdc6
│ ext4 ZorinOS-15-WD
│ c9ab907a-aaea-4441-946a-e346ac4ace31
├─sdc7
│ ext4 LMDE-Cindy-WD
│ f800b5e1-1d18-4df3-a873-cef51959d799
├─sdc8
│ ext4 Zorin12.4-WD
│ 6a04d911-62dc-4b47-bac9-e37f02ad1420
├─sdc9
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ a8ea3da4-9d27-4a4b-8e04-ba309d8633a7
├─sdc10
│ ext4 MJRO-Cinn-WD
│ 394c75db-d300-4b79-b9b8-21e9997e884a
├─sdc11
│ ext4 Peppermint9-WD
│ d73ca984-73c6-4b74-991d-7c3e7dbda5d7
├─sdc12
│ ext4 Debian9.8MATE-WD
│ 4db7343a-0b8c-47eb-8f04-923172e17d1f
├─sdc13
│ ext4 Tara-Xfce-WD
│ f641a844-b1ee-41da-a713-916010f4e1d3
├─sdc14
│ ext4 ArcolinuxCinn-WD
│ a0538838-1787-4fcf-8281-5e31365ff780
├─sdc15
│ ext4 TessaMATE-WD
│ 442bedc2-3f4f-43fc-888a-55321fc3be16
├─sdc16
│ ext4 ElementaryOSJuno
│ 2fd8e645-554d-4cec-a9fc-855c8a116349
├─sdc17
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ 17c96be0-7db7-42e4-9ab8-8c9754e73d58
├─sdc18
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ 53dfd40a-af89-4abb-89f4-b55335d14645
├─sdc19
│ ext4 PeachOSI-TW-WD
│ 431987af-b3c5-48a5-af9c-f16823fa60d5
├─sdc20
│ ext4 MJRO-DEEPIN-WD
│ b2473640-cae3-43dd-8d56-9e21573af00e
├─sdc21
│ ext4 DistroReady-40GB
│ ba340f88-7f63-49b8-9d1a-e5c1d37864e6
├─sdc22
│ ext4 PeachPatriot-WD
│ e7069023-2661-4111-a6b2-a63e6e893f65
├─sdc23
│ ext4 BionicGNOME-WD
│ 00ad9fb1-d6ee-4c2d-aa15-83218878f5dc
├─sdc24
│ ext4 BionicMATE-WD
│ 8ab2aaf8-fb92-4e58-a98c-31f46a601856
├─sdc25
│ ext4 Swagarch
│ ba0ababc-a76c-4b94-9774-9d5450cdf5d2
├─sdc26
│ ext4 Peppermint10-WD
│ 7c15308c-fbac-4ec7-90ca-d313d81da7e7
├─sdc27
│ ext4 SylviaCinnamonWD
│ 5999de8e-97ea-4bd9-bec8-3b000ecf5926
├─sdc28
│ ext4 MJRO-MATE-WD
│ 58c5f278-e6b9-49cc-ab90-e100261da3c2
├─sdc29
│ ext4 4VMs-WD
│ 4e5bccbe-13f5-4842-9fb4-7cfe674cd29e
├─sdc30
│ ext4 TaraCinnamon-WD
│ e733a334-31a5-4a6e-953b-d781f6d92fed
├─sdc31
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ 0aa7afd2-1b94-4ea9-bbc8-0335bdbd0f90
├─sdc32
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ 698cdcd6-9f40-4ec0-b75e-b90664979705
├─sdc33
│ ext4 EmmabuntusDE2-WD
│ ec04acab-4ed6-47ed-90f2-f588b89d5902
├─sdc34
│ ext4 BunsenlabsHelium
│ 19180b3c-4f8b-4f80-8a15-a1aacc1b5712
├─sdc35
│ ext4 SerenaCinn-WD
│ cd9184c4-7920-410d-bec6-2dfa26f51007
├─sdc36
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ 1c2a20da-d564-472a-b83a-6e07bfaac246
├─sdc37
│ ext4 Pop!_OS-WD
│ a893774c-3814-4988-a3a3-1b388bacf150
├─sdc38
│ ext4 DistroReady30GB
│ 71d9d7fc-f6c0-4c69-959f-090b66341d66
├─sdc39
│ ext4 TimeshiftSabayon
│ 47807461-b32a-42b9-8b0a-7231c0bac96a
├─sdc40
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ de999d74-a68f-4c73-89dd-3463fc36e892
├─sdc41
│ ext4 DistroReady
│ cc3eacee-8d3b-44e3-8b3f-bc749c8ad986
├─sdc43
│ ext4 Ex-Adata-1
│ 12584a4b-2297-413c-b4f4-4cd97f533295
└─sdc47
ext4 Save-Doc-DL-VID
83579b75-e0dc-4af1-a8b5-e4a8eb8c56b6
sr0

and

[email protected]:~
$ inxi -Fxz
System:
Host: MX-19.1-SSD Kernel: 4.19.0-6-amd64 x86_64 bits: 64 compiler: gcc
v: 8.3.0 Desktop: Xfce 4.14.2
Distro: MX-19.2_x64 patito feo February 15 2020
base: Debian GNU/Linux 10 (buster)
Machine:
Type: Laptop System: Dell product: Inspiron 5770 v: N/A serial: <filter>
Mobo: Dell model: 0XH3XD v: A00 serial: <filter> UEFI: Dell v: 1.1.8
date: 08/15/2018
Battery:
ID-1: BAT0 charge: 38.3 Wh condition: 38.3/42.0 Wh (91%)
model: SMP DELL Y3F7Y6B status: Full
CPU:
Topology: Quad Core model: Intel Core i7-8550U bits: 64 type: MT MCP
arch: Kaby Lake rev: A L2 cache: 8192 KiB
flags: avx avx2 lm nx pae sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 ssse3 vmx
bogomips: 31872
Speed: 800 MHz min/max: 400/4000 MHz Core speeds (MHz): 1: 800 2: 800
3: 800 4: 800 5: 800 6: 800 7: 800 8: 800
Graphics:
Device-1: Intel UHD Graphics 620 vendor: Dell driver: i915 v: kernel
bus ID: 00:02.0
Device-2: AMD Topaz XT [Radeon R7 M260/M265 / M340/M360 / M440/M445]
vendor: Dell driver: amdgpu v: kernel bus ID: 01:00.0
Display: x11 server: X.Org 1.20.4 driver: amdgpu,ati,modesetting
unloaded: fbdev,vesa resolution: 1920x1080~60Hz
OpenGL: renderer: Mesa DRI Intel UHD Graphics 620 (Kabylake GT2)
v: 4.5 Mesa 18.3.6 direct render: Yes
Audio:
Device-1: Intel Sunrise Point-LP HD Audio vendor: Dell
driver: snd_hda_intel v: kernel bus ID: 00:1f.3
Sound Server: ALSA v: k4.19.0-6-amd64
Network:
Device-1: Realtek RTL8101/2/6E PCI Express Fast/Gigabit Ethernet
vendor: Dell RTL810xE driver: r8169 v: kernel port: d000 bus ID: 02:00.0
IF: eth0 state: down mac: <filter>
Device-2: Qualcomm Atheros QCA9377 802.11ac Wireless Network Adapter
vendor: Dell driver: ath10k_pci v: kernel port: d000 bus ID: 03:00.0
IF: wlan0 state: up mac: <filter>
Device-3: Qualcomm Atheros type: USB driver: btusb bus ID: 1-7:5
Drives:
Local Storage: total: 5.69 TiB used: 8.75 GiB (0.2%)
ID-1: /dev/sda vendor: Seagate model: ST2000LM007-1R8174 size: 1.82 TiB
ID-2: /dev/sdb vendor: Micron model: 1100 SATA 256GB size: 238.47 GiB
ID-3: /dev/sdc type: USB vendor: Western Digital model: WD My Book 25EE
size: 3.64 TiB
RAID:
Hardware-1: Intel 82801 Mobile SATA Controller [RAID mode] driver: ahci
v: 3.0 bus ID: 00:17.0
Partition:
ID-1: / size: 14.64 GiB used: 8.71 GiB (59.5%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sdb10
Sensors:
System Temperatures: cpu: 55.0 C mobo: 51.0 C sodimm: 53.0 C gpu: amdgpu
temp: 511 C
Fan Speeds (RPM): cpu: 3486
Info:
Processes: 247 Uptime: 5m Memory: 15.57 GiB used: 2.67 GiB (17.2%)
Init: SysVinit runlevel: 5 Compilers: gcc: 8.3.0 Shell: bash v: 5.0.3
inxi: 3.0.36

Cheers and

Avagudweegend

Wiz
I would never disagree with a Wizard, even a Wizard half a world away ;)
With 16GB of RAM, I actually don't "need" swap of any kind, and don't use much of the SWAP I do have. I would argue that requiring compression/decompression, even in RAM takes CPU cycles, but that's a bad argument, since ZSWAP is done in RAM and is much faster than writing to disk, even with an SSD.

So it turns out that even though
Code:
[email protected]:/etc/cups/ppd$ dmesg | grep -i swap
[    0.125857] Spectre V1 : Mitigation: usercopy/swapgs barriers and __user pointer sanitization
[    0.574453] zswap: loaded using pool lzo/zbud
[    4.307419] Adding 16167932k swap on /dev/sda4.  Priority:-2 extents:1 across:16167932k SSFS
much more telling is
Code:
[email protected]:/etc/cups/ppd$ cat /sys/module/zswap/parameters/enabled
N
So john-Desktop doesn't write to ZSWAP and the SWAP partition isn't using more than about 10.8 MB. So it looks like my PC is using its RAM as effectively as possible, no noticeable gains are going to occur with ZSWAP
 

f33dm3bits

Gold Member
Gold Supporter
Credits
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LVM has its disadvantages, also. To quote the Arch link:
For a small, single boot installation and usage pattern, LVM is not necessary and an unneeded complication. I would agree that for a large installation, especially something like an Enterprise, LVM would have a use case, but an appropriate RAID configuration would be better.
I have to disagree on lvm only being for Enterprise setups. I use lvm om my nas that way I can put all my data disks in one big pool and if I ever need to add a disk I can easily add that disk to my pool. I also use lvm for my personal laptops and desktops with one disk because when I install a system I install it with the minimum amount of space needed to install the system. I don't like to have to guess ahead of time how much each of my partitions is going to use and then running into the problem that my partition is not big enough. Then it being in a pain in the ass to have to resize partitions with gparted, from my experience 99% of the time you need to grow partitions rather than shrinking them. Also lvm isn't complicated when you learn to work with it, lastly companies use hardware raid and lvm so that you can lose a disk or two and replace them without losing data and lvm so that it's easy to resize filesystems without with having downtime.
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
7,589
I personally am finding the information on LVM and RAID very interesting, as I don't use either.

However the discussion/debate is unlikely to be resolved here and is only likely to confuse the OP. Perhaps you pair could toss a coin and start a Thread on the subject? As long as I don't have to come in and adjudicate pistols at 20 paces :)

The reason I asked my questions at #4 was because the OP has said here

https://www.linux.org/threads/is-unity3d-running-on-pop-os-20-04.30980/

that he is using Pop OS, and has said in this Thread that he has BIOS configuration. If that is BIOS/MBR, then he has the 4 Partition Rule to confront, even with an additional drive.

I regard both of you highly, both for the contributions you make to this site and your willingness to help others, so take no offence where none is intended, and let's see if the OP comes back with an answer to my questions.

Cheers

Wizard
 

jglen490

Well-Known Member
Credits
3,116
I have to disagree on lvm only being for Enterprise setups. I use lvm om my nas that way I can put all my data disks in one big pool and if I ever need to add a disk I can easily add that disk to my pool. I also use lvm for my personal laptops and desktops with one disk because when I install a system I install it with the minimum amount of space needed to install the system. I don't like to have to guess ahead of time how much each of my partitions is going to use and then running into the problem that my partition is not big enough. Then it being in a pain in the ass to have to resize partitions with gparted, from my experience 99% of the time you need to grow partitions rather than shrinking them. Also lvm isn't complicated when you learn to work with it, lastly companies use hardware raid and lvm so that you can lose a disk or two and replace them without losing data and lvm so that it's easy to resize filesystems without with having downtime.
I am not talking about a NAS, which is a model of an Enterprise solution. I use a NAS for a non-profit that I do some IT work for, and yes being able to add disks to the pool with nearly zero effort is a great thing. I am talking about a small, single boot Linux installation on a standalone PC, which I believe is the point of this entire thread.

Employ the KISS model, and it's all better. Once the OP has a working Linux system, and learns a bit more about operating and maintaining, then the OP will be in a much better position to make life more complex - if that is necessary.
 

f33dm3bits

Gold Member
Gold Supporter
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7,662
I agree with you on the part to keep it simple since OP is just getting started, that having one partition and installing everything under that partition should get OP started and keeping having the KISS model so OP can learn. I just wanted to put out there that even for a normal desktop system lvm can come in handy for managing your disk space easily and efficiently, I only mentioned it so that OP knows it exists since the topic is best partitions for future upgrades. I am happy that OP started their Linux journey and don't want to overwhelm OP with information but I thought it was worth mentioning so they at least know lvm exists.
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
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That's an end to it then, folks :), you've each had Right of Reply.

Haven't seen the OP in 4 days, which perhaps is not unusual, given COVID and life's demands that interfere with Linux (shame).

Cheers

Wizard
 

[email protected]

New Member
Credits
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Hello All!


Oh my god! There's a huge discussion going on when I was little away. Sorry for delay response. I was having a bit tight schedule.

Actually I am using Pop OS in a VM and I am planning to make it my primary Operating System. I have currently 2GB of DDR3 RAM and still I have 1 more RAM slot. So I am thinking to buy a 4GB RAM. But I don't know is that sufficient for game development. Let's see.

Wooh! I think I have lot to learn from these discussions itself. Thank you for your Responses.
 
Last edited:


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