Boot loop on NVME install

shemp

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I'm an inexperienced user. I have two of these machines.


In the first one, I installed a 2TB samsung NVME and a 32gb corsair ram. It's running Ubuntu 20.04. It's working just fine and as intended.

I ordered another bare bones i7 and intended to install my 1TB Samsung NVME and the other 32gb corsair (which I got together with the first 32gb.)

I tried to install Kali linux from a live USB but after installation, and removal of the usb stick, it boots up into a neverending loop. It never gets past the loading screen. I also tried two different distros, Ubuntu and Linux Mint. The same thing happens. Install from liveUSB, remove usb installer, then boot, loading screen, reset. It works fine from the live session on anything I'm running.

At first I thought the Kali installer had messed something up with the GRUB bootloader since during the install, it asked some questions about installing it on the same partition. I didn't understand what I was doing, so I'm not sure if that was the problem or not. I'm starting to think this new system is faulty somehow.

This is supposed to be a backup machine in the event my other one goes down. Everything is the same (afaik) except that the NVMEs are different capacities. I checked the power supply, and while the construction is slightly different, it's the same amps, volts, etc.
 


N

NorthWest

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Everything is the same (afaik)
As a first step, perhaps check that the BIOS/UEFI settings are the same in both machines. The symptoms you describe in the second machine have occurred in my experience where there was a setting for MS in the BIOS rather than legacy or unix, but it was on machinery considerably older than yours and I'm not familiar with the BIOS/UEFI of your units.
 

kibasnowpaw

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If you have installed one Linux, i would always recommend making sure the SSD is Formatted. There can still be data on it that interfere with the install even if you do a Clean install and SSD Erase on the live disk.

At first I thought the Kali installer had messed something up with the GRUB bootloader since during the install, it asked some questions about installing it on the same partition. I didn't understand what I was doing, so I'm not sure if that was the problem or not. I'm starting to think this new system is faulty somehow.

What it's asking is do you want to have both OS on the HDD or make a clean install. Then you choose Erase Disk and install POP_OP. It may ask you on whish SSD if you have more than one.

fcfafd712830014a91c5850b1102f207.png
 
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shemp

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If you have installed one Linux, i would always recommend making sure the SSD is Formatted. There can still be data on it that interfere with the install even if you do a Clean install and SSD Erase on the live disk.



What it's asking is do you want to have both OS on the HDD or make a clean install. Then you choose Erase Disk and install POP_OP. It may ask you on whish SSD if you have more than one.

fcfafd712830014a91c5850b1102f207.png
Any suggestion on how to format the SSD? Being a newbie at Linux, I was assuming the installer would wipe the whole drive when it set the new partition table. I guess there can still be data there.
I only want one OS and one main partition. I guess my problem is I don't understand the bootloader and where it is. I was afraid I overwrote something on the firmware since I've tried three distro ISOs and they all have the same problem. But grub is just located on the small "efi" partition, yes? It's not something on the motherboard.
 
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shemp

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As a first step, perhaps check that the BIOS/UEFI settings are the same in both machines. The symptoms you describe in the second machine have occurred in my experience where there was a setting for MS in the BIOS rather than legacy or unix, but it was on machinery considerably older than yours and I'm not familiar with the BIOS/UEFI of your units.
That's a good idea but currently the first machine is performing a some network duties for which I don't want it to go offline yet. I'd have to schedule a time to check the bios. I'm not too optimistic of finding the problem there but ya never know I guess.
I looked to thru it and didn't see any mention of MS or Microsoft.
If it's any help, the BIOS says "Aptio setup utility - copyright 2022 American megatrends, Inc"
 

Lord Boltar

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Modern versions of Ubuntu will boot and install normally on most PCs with Secure Boot enabled. This is because Ubuntu’s first-stage EFI boot loader is signed by Microsoft. Whereas, Kali Linux is not and therefore requires "Secure Boot " to be turned off
 
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shemp

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Modern versions of Ubuntu will boot and install normally on most PCs with Secure Boot enabled. This is because Ubuntu’s first-stage EFI boot loader is signed by Microsoft. Whereas, Kali Linux is not and therefore requires "Secure Boot " to be turned off
Just checked. My secure boot is off. I'm starting to think it is something to do with the ram. My other machine had a problem where I installed two 32gb corsairs and it would not boot. Just a black screen. I took one out and it booted just fine.

This one works when booted from a live usb, though, so I don't understand how that could work if there was a problem with the ram.

The other possibility is the NVME I'm using but it worked just fine previously in my first machine. It seems to accept the installation of Linux with no issue in the new one.
 
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shemp

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I checked the RAM module and seated it in the other slot on the off chance it had something to do with it (like having two installed in my other machine as I described in my previous post). No change. I made sure the NVME was seated properly and ran a test in the BIOS that was called something like "controller and namespace test" which passed.

On a interesting note, I have Kali installed right now on it and it will actually take me to the log in screen (unlike ubuntu and Mint) and allows me to input the name and pass that I set up during installation before it resets.
 
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shemp

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I checked the RAM module and seated it in the other slot on the off chance it had something to do with it (like having two installed in my other machine as I described in my previous post). No change. I made sure the NVME was seated properly and ran a test in the BIOS that was called something like "controller and namespace test" which passed.

On a interesting note, I have Kali installed right now on it and it will actually take me to the log in screen (unlike ubuntu and Mint) and allows me to input the name and pass that I set up during installation before it resets.

So an update: I received a replacement unit from the retailer. Previous to that, I had taken out the SSD and installed it in my desktop which I found had a slot. I was able to boot from it with no problem after setting it first in the boot order. I thought this eliminated the SSD as the source of the problem.
Today, I got the new unit and installed my SSD and RAM. Same exact issue occurs again. I really do not get it.
If 1)the SSD will boot on another mobo, 2)the new system will boot from a live USB, and 3)I can install the SSD in the new system and then install linux on the SSD with no errors or issues...yet when trying to boot the SSD in the new system it has this problem.
I can only think it's some problem with power supply to the SSD. But if that were the case, why is it happening with the replacement system, if it were a error in the manufacturing of the motherboard?
 
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D

Deleted member 140690

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HUNSN BM14 mini pcCould be your SSD is too hungry for power, are you trying
to boot into it from a connected keyboard and mouse,
do you use the same keyboard and mouse that are known
to work on another system, are you trying too use wake on lan.

As others have said, try formatting the SSD first,
you can use GParted on Linux, make sure you format the correct
drive, format to ext4, and make the partition type GPT, unmount the drive then try to flash a new OS.

One other thing, I had boot cycle issues in the past, and for some
reason using a different tool to flash the drive changed that.
I can't explain it, but using unetbootin worked when the local
make backup / startup disk that's found on lots on linux systems failed, then there is balena etcher, that has failed me writing linux OS to disk many times when the above two succeeded.
and the opposite was the case on different linux distros, I find it
trial and error unless someone with the same Pc can tell you x or z is the option that works.
Here is Gparted working, maybe look into partition types in
the second video to help further understand what partition
table to use for your needs.
MBR vs GPT
 
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shemp

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HUNSN BM14 mini pcCould be your SSD is too hungry for power, are you trying
to boot into it from a connected keyboard and mouse,
do you use the same keyboard and mouse that are known
to work on another system, are you trying too use wake on lan.

As others have said, try formatting the SSD first,
you can use GParted on Linux, make sure you format the correct
drive, format to ext4, and make the partition type GPT, unmount the drive then try to flash a new OS.

One other thing, I had boot cycle issues in the past, and for some
reason using a different tool to flash the drive changed that.
I can't explain it, but using unetbootin worked when the local
make backup / startup disk that's found on lots on linux systems failed, then there is balena etcher, that has failed me writing linux OS to disk many times when the above two succeeded.
and the opposite was the case on different linux distros, I find it
trial and error unless someone with the same Pc can tell you x or z is the option that works.
Here is Gparted working, maybe look into partition types in
the second video to help further understand what partition
table to use for your needs.
MBR vs GPT
I haven't tried booting without the mouse and keyboard but I do use the same mouse and keyboard on the other machine which I thought was the same specs, and I bought it from the same retailer.
I don't know what wake on lan is. Is it a bios setting?

I have been using balena etcher for all the live USBs I've made. It worked previously when I set up the first machine (with ubuntu) which even had this same SSD in it (before I got a larger SSD for it).

I'll have to try gparted on Monday when I have time to work on it. Thank you.
 
D

Deleted member 140690

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I haven't tried booting without the mouse and keyboard but I do use the same mouse and keyboard on the other machine which I thought was the same specs, and I bought it from the same retailer.
I don't know what wake on lan is. Is it a bios setting?

I have been using balena etcher for all the live USBs I've made. It worked previously when I set up the first machine (with ubuntu) which even had this same SSD in it (before I got a larger SSD for it).

I'll have to try gparted on Monday when I have time to work on it. Thank you.
WOL Wake on Lan, its not supported on your device as far as am aware, so you could not simply network into your device without switching it on first.
Balena Etcher could be your problem, we do not know what it is doing under the hood, and it could simply be using the wrong settings for the OS being written, look at MBR vs GPT and listen closely to the part where its says not boot, near the beginning.
If your using Ubuntu it is under the System tools > Start up disc creator, maybe try this to write the OS, I take it you already have a way to connect your SSD to the usb port of a computer to flash it.

The Second video MBR vs GPT is a must look if you are to understand how the wrong combination of hardware and OS combine to cause trouble depending on whether MBR or GPT is used / expected.
Hope you get sorted, and no, use your keyboard and mouse as long as you know they are working, otherwise how will you log in, unless you have previously set the computer to allow SSH login which is easiest done from a working computer.
 
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shemp

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WOL Wake on Lan, its not supported on your device as far as am aware, so you could not simply network into your device without switching it on first.
Balena Etcher could be your problem, we do not know what it is doing under the hood, and it could simply be using the wrong settings for the OS being written, look at MBR vs GPT and listen closely to the part where its says not boot, near the beginning.
If your using Ubuntu it is under the System tools > Start up disc creator, maybe try this to write the OS, I take it you already have a way to connect your SSD to the usb port of a computer to flash it.

The Second video MBR vs GPT is a must look if you are to understand how the wrong combination of hardware and OS combine to cause trouble depending on whether MBR or GPT is used / expected.
Hope you get sorted, and no, use your keyboard and mouse as long as you know they are working, otherwise how will you log in, unless you have previously set the computer to allow SSH login which is easiest done from a working computer.
I will take a look at those videos as soon as I can.
How I'm doing it is that I have a windows desktop that I've downloaded the ISO files for ubuntu and others I want to try. I flash a USB with balena there, then take it to the miniPC and set the bios to boot with it.
 

Lord Boltar

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I will take a look at those videos as soon as I can.
How I'm doing it is that I have a windows desktop that I've downloaded the ISO files for ubuntu and others I want to try. I flash a USB with balena there, then take it to the miniPC and set the bios to boot with it.
You can also use Rufus or Unetbootin from Windows - generally you do not have to change the Bios boot order most Bios have the ability to call a one time boot menu usually by tapping the F12 Key at startup - you may have to enable that function within the Bios
 
D

Deleted member 140690

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I will take a look at those videos as soon as I can.
How I'm doing it is that I have a windows desktop that I've downloaded the ISO files for ubuntu and others I want to try. I flash a USB with balena there, then take it to the miniPC and set the bios to boot with it
Ok, then as mentioned there is a program called Rufus,
its for Windows, download it and use it to flash the ISO.
You could first use windows on disk management tools
to format the drive to FAT32, that will ensure it is wiped
for Rufus to flash it, Rufus will format it again during the
flash process.
I no longer use Windows so can't be of much help regarding
the location of Windows disk utilities but I think right click on
the drive entry and format should be available.
RUFUS LINK
Your SSD being used for other installs could be part of the problem,
so make sure you format it before letting Rufus flash it.

Also tell us what OS your going to install, the version number
too, maybe include a link to the download page.
Make sure you don't download the 32 bit or an ARM version of Linux.
 
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shemp

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Also tell us what OS your going to install, the version number
too, maybe include a link to the download page.
Make sure you don't download the 32 bit or an ARM version of Linux.
I think I'll settle on Ubuntu. I think the most recent version is 20.04. I had a book about penetration testing that recommended Kali but I think I can download any tools I might need that were included in that package.
 
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shemp

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Final update since I'm sending it back for a refund. I flashed a USB with Ubuntu 20.04 using Rufus. First, before I tried that, I wanted to try my 16GB of Corsair vengeance to see if it would perform differently. I tried both 8GB modules and it wouldn't even get the AMI bios screen. The only reaction upon hitting the power button was a periodically flashing power LED. So I tried just one 8GB module. That results in the system booting from the live USB until I got to the screen with "Try Ubuntu" or "Install Ubuntu" options. I clicked Try Ubuntu because I was going to try to use Gparted to again format the SSD as was recommended by user Here To Learn. That made it simply reboot. These same two 8GB modules worked just fine in the first box I purchased from this seller, so it seems to me like something is different with the power supply on this new unit. It's not enough.

I should have known better than ordering again from them since the first device, while it does work now with a single 32GB module, it is listed as able to handle up to 64GB. I explicitly asked them via text message whether Corsair Vengeance would work and they said it would, although they recommended others like Samsung, Hynix, Micron Crucial, or Kingston.

Anyway, thanks to all for the advice and help given.
 
D

Deleted member 140690

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Final update since I'm sending it back for a refund. I flashed a USB with Ubuntu 20.04 using Rufus. First, before I tried that, I wanted to try my 16GB of Corsair vengeance to see if it would perform differently. I tried both 8GB modules and it wouldn't even get the AMI bios screen. The only reaction upon hitting the power button was a periodically flashing power LED. So I tried just one 8GB module. That results in the system booting from the live USB until I got to the screen with "Try Ubuntu" or "Install Ubuntu" options. I clicked Try Ubuntu because I was going to try to use Gparted to again format the SSD as was recommended by user Here To Learn. That made it simply reboot. These same two 8GB modules worked just fine in the first box I purchased from this seller, so it seems to me like something is different with the power supply on this new unit. It's not enough.

I should have known better than ordering again from them since the first device, while it does work now with a single 32GB module, it is listed as able to handle up to 64GB. I explicitly asked them via text message whether Corsair Vengeance would work and they said it would, although they recommended others like Samsung, Hynix, Micron Crucial, or Kingston.

Anyway, thanks to all for the advice and help given.
Annoying when things like this don't work as expected.
probably better off using something from Intel or AMD, Intel will probably give the most linux support, especially if using the onboard graphics, no fiddling with graphics drives for AMD or Nvidia.

What is it you plan on using the device for, maybe others have done the same and can recommend a device.
 
D

Deleted member 140690

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Did you try to get into bios and turn off tpm, trusted platform module,
sometimes you have to set the root password in the bios, some bios will accept just a single character password, then disable the tpm module, here is a video showing it having to be done to install Windows, not the best video but shows what I mean, I found it researching the laptop he uses.
 
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