Solved Can't delete files

Solved issue

Crippled2013

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I have downloaded some records from my bank that I found out later that they were incompatible with MX23.2 Linux Xfce. I deleted the file but after that it put an infinite amount of these empty empty files on my desktop. It won't let me delete them and I get this error message that doesn't make any sense. How do I get rid of these empty files? Here is a screen shot of it.
 


It would be of interest to know in what way the files were incompatible ...

That may well be the crux of the problem

Tell us how you downloaded them....as pdf's or some other format ?
 
It would be of interest to know in what way the files were incompatible ...

That may well be the crux of the problem

Tell us how you downloaded them....as pdf's or some other format ?
I didn't know the format when I downloaded it. It wouldn't open so I deleted it. They were definitely not PDF's. From what I recall it was csv file. Now I have an infinite amount of these empty files that are all over my desktop.
 
The simplest case is deleting a single file in the current directory. Type the rm command, a space, and then the name of the file you want to delete.
 

How to Delete Files With rm​

The simplest way to use rm is to provide the name of a file you want to delete.

rm config.gc
Deleting a single file by passing its filename to rm

You're silently returned to the command line. rm adopts the classic, close-lipped Linux stance that if it doesn't complain about anything, you can assume it did what you asked. Providing a filename like this causes rm to look for the file in the current working directory.

READ THESE


 
The simplest case is deleting a single file in the current directory. Type the rm command, a space, and then the name of the file you want to delete.
This is what happens when I do that. $ rm AncAB4Mf.csv.part
rm: cannot remove 'AncAB4Mf.csv.part': No such file or directory
 
On your desktop, right click in an open space, and select 'Open as Root'

Type in your password

Then 'select' a few of those files, and then right click and select delete......or instead of right clicking etc you can just hit the delete button on the keyboard....confirm the deletion.

Let me know how that goes.
 
What is the result when you select 'open root thunar' ?
 
What is the result when you select 'open root thunar' ?
It worked. Thank you very much. I had to force shutdown after that by hitting the power switch which is why it took so long to reply on top of the time it took to delete Zillions of these annoying empty ghost files.
 
It worked
That's what I like to hear !

When you next download from the bank, check to see if there is a drop down arrow to enable you download as a pdf or similar

.csv files can be a pain.
 
Go back to your first post....and over on the right hand side, you will see...
1709352649260.png

Click on the three little dots and arrow and click on edit & follow the prompts to mark the thread Solved, please.
 
That's what I like to hear !

When you next download from the bank, check to see if there is a drop down arrow to enable you download as a pdf or similar

.csv files can be a pain.
There was no such option. I have a stupid bank where I live that the system administrator that I spoke with years ago that agrees with me but he has to follow orders from a blithering idiot that is the CEO of that bank.
 
Go back to your first post....and over on the right hand side, you will see...
View attachment 18639
Click on the three little dots and arrow and click on edit & follow the prompts to mark the thread Solved, please.
I edited the title of my post earlier marking it as solved. I tried it your way but it didn't work. Thanks.
 
I tried it your way but it didn't work.

It does, but I have fixed it for you.

It works as follows (from another person's thread)

nYSKHvh.png


Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 
When you download files via a browser, the browser creates temporary .part files like that until the files have fully downloaded.
E.g. somefile.csv.part.
Once the file has fully downloaded, it’ll be renamed to:
somefile.csv

Where you’re receiving so many files at once, it might take a long time to fully download all of the files because it’s trying to download all of them at once.

Maybe if you’d waited a while, the downloads would complete and all of those .part files would have been renamed?

If a download fails, or is cancelled, the .part files are usually automatically deleted by the browser.

What file format was the original file you downloaded in?
 
When you download files via a browser, the browser creates temporary .part files like that until the files have fully downloaded.
E.g. somefile.csv.part.
Once the file has fully downloaded, it’ll be renamed to:
somefile.csv

Where you’re receiving so many files at once, it might take a long time to fully download all of the files because it’s trying to download all of them at once.

Maybe if you’d waited a while, the downloads would complete and all of those .part files would have been renamed?

If a download fails, or is cancelled, the .part files are usually automatically deleted by the browser.

What file format was the original file you downloaded in?
No, I only downloaded "one file". What it did was it took "one" file that I downloaded that was downloaded to the Downloads folder and created infinite empty ghost files on my desktop. No, it fully downloaded. The original file format was csv.
 
No, I only downloaded "one file". What it did was it took "one" file that I downloaded that was downloaded to the Downloads folder and created infinite empty ghost files on my desktop. No, it fully downloaded. The original file format was csv.
That’s really strange. Like I said, .part files are usually temporary files created by browsers for partially complete downloads.

How did you end up exploding the one, single .csv file into thousands? What did you do with the file after downloading it?

Maybe try downloading it again. After the download is complete, edit its properties to prevent it being executable. Quite often files received from a Windows file- system will have executable permissions set on it.

E.g. in the terminal
Bash:
chmod -x /path/to/file.csv
Note:
Where /path/to/ is the path to the directory containing the downloaded csv file. And where file.csv is the name of the downloaded file.
In other words, substitute /path/to/file.csv in the above with the path/filename of the downloaded file.

Or in the file manager, right click the file, select properties and ensure that the executable flag is NOT checked.

Disabling the executable bit will help to prevent it potentially being ran by the shell as a script. Maybe that’s what the problem was.

After ensuing the file isn’t executable, try using the file command in the terminal to check the type of the file, before attempting to open it in something like libreoffice calc, or visually checking its contents with a text editor.

E.g.
Bash:
file /path/to/file.csv

If that lists the file as anything other than CSV text, then it’s not a CSV file.

CSV is a pretty simple file format which has been around forever. I’ve never seen a simple .csv file do anything like this before.

Otherwise, perhaps the file you downloaded was a self extracting archive, containing a bunch of .csv files. Like an executable zip or something?!
 
That’s really strange. Like I said, .part files are usually temporary files created by browsers for partially complete downloads.

How did you end up exploding the one, single .csv file into thousands? What did you do with the file after downloading it?

Maybe try downloading it again. After the download is complete, edit its properties to prevent it being executable. Quite often files received from a Windows file- system will have executable permissions set on it.

E.g. in the terminal
Bash:
chmod -x /path/to/file.csv
Note:
Where /path/to/ is the path to the directory containing the downloaded csv file. And where file.csv is the name of the downloaded file.
In other words, substitute /path/to/file.csv in the above with the path/filename of the downloaded file.

Or in the file manager, right click the file, select properties and ensure that the executable flag is NOT checked.

Disabling the executable bit will help to prevent it potentially being ran by the shell as a script. Maybe that’s what the problem was.

After ensuing the file isn’t executable, try using the file command in the terminal to check the type of the file, before attempting to open it in something like libreoffice calc, or visually checking its contents with a text editor.

E.g.
Bash:
file /path/to/file.csv

If that lists the file as anything other than CSV text, then it’s not a CSV file.

CSV is a pretty simple file format which has been around forever. I’ve never seen a simple .csv file do anything like this before.

Otherwise, perhaps the file you downloaded was a self extracting archive, containing a bunch of .csv files. Like an executable zip or something?!
I guess you missed seeing that this has been solved many days ago.
My computer works fine now. I am not going to do anything you say because it will break my computer again.
 
Last edited:
ok, no worries. I saw that you’d solved the problem with removing the huge number of .part files.

I was just trying to understand how the .csv file ended up doing what it did and attempted to recommend a way for you to download and inspect your personal data without it exploding spectacularly.

Nothing should get broken.

But if you’re happy to leave it, that’s fine too!
 

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