Create a bootable USB stick with autorun (and fdisk?)

NilsGN

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Hello,

I am looking for a (simple) way to create a USB stick that I can let my wife plug in and just start the computer (linuxOS) and then there will be a message (just in case a mistake happened) where the 'user' can choose to cancel.
This USB stick will then, upon approval, erase everything on your computer's hard drives.
I want to do this because I have privacy information that is only for me.

When I was working in a municipality, within healthcare, with security (information with high privacy) a few years ago, I created a DOS floppy disk that erased the entire C: volume and then wrote small files that filled the entire partition. Then split the volume into two partitions. Wrote files to full volume on both partitions. Then everything was erased again and then created a single partition.

Then we were able to give the computer to voluntary organizations.

I now want to create a similar one, but then a USB stick and it is enough to erase / clear existing partitions.

I've tried FreeDos and Parted Magic but can't get it done with autorun.

The easiest thing would be to have a DOS installation and fdisk.

Some ideas?
 


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NilsGN

NilsGN

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Thanks,
I will read about dban. A short look, it will not erase USB connected SATA-HDD?
 

atanere

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About the most simple solution that I find is Redkey USB, but it's fairly expensive. Both Redkey USB and DBAN/Blancco are "wiping" solutions though... they will take several hours (or more) to complete. I'm not sure that's what you want.


I now want to create a similar one, but then a USB stick and it is enough to erase / clear existing partitions.

I've tried FreeDos and Parted Magic but can't get it done with autorun.

The easiest thing would be to have a DOS installation and fdisk.
I tried FreeDOS/Fdisk and a Windows 10 Recovery USB with diskpart... these work, but not with the simplicity that you want. If you can teach your wife the steps, or make a checklist to follow, then any of these tools will work, as well as Gparted or the fdisk included with any bootable Linux distro.

For speed, I would boot on the smallest, fastest Linux USB I could make, run fdisk -l in a terminal to identify all drives/partitions, and fdisk/delete as needed.

I also tried to get an old Windows 98 boot CD transferred over to USB, but I didn't get it to work. Perhaps it would, with more effort, but you may not have access to these old files anyway. If you have a running WIndows 98 computer, I think it would actually be easy... if it would recognize your USB stick.

Good luck!
 
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NilsGN

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aranere (sorry...; atanere ;)): I will check this out
 
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NilsGN

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arochester: I read about it and it says: "Secure Erase is not available on SCSI hard drives" and that's what I have. But I'll read more on that page and follow up some links.
 

Redkey

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Hi, an old thread but for anyone reading this, we would recommend our product: Redkey as the optimal solution here starting from approx. $25 at time of writing.

Untitled-345.png


Redkey is specifically designed to be easy to use, is semi-automated and performs a certified "Secure" erase - able to erase all areas of a disc including the Host Protected Area and Device Configuration Overlay AKA provisioning areas. Redkey is already used by thousands for similar purposes to as described - when selling, within business, within healthcare, when recycling, for home privacy, within finance and for a multitude of other reasons.

Our pricier Ultimate version key although intended for business use can be pre-programmed for full Automation where supported by relevant hardware. In this way it can be configured for full "plug & play" Furthermore, we can also offer a small discount to linux.org forum users on our Ultimate version key.

Discount code: 6WS5951Q35MN

  • 10% off Redkey USB Ultimate
  • For everyone
  • One use per customer
  • Active from today until 10 Feb 2022

Enjoy.
 

f33dm3bits

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@Redkey I would never buy such a usb device since there are plenty of opensource tools available to securely wipe your storage devices, the one already mentioned earlier in this topic is the most well known: dban.
 

Redkey

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@Redkey I would never buy such a usb device since there are plenty of opensource tools available to securely wipe your storage devices, the one already mentioned earlier in this topic is the most well known: dban.
Hi, there are always those who won't see much value in something, but everyone knows there is no such thing as a free lunch. "Most well known" by no means demonstrates fitness for purpose. Besides, some "free" products are actually used as a loss-leading funnel into the same companies rather expensive pay-per use product. Ah - well that would pay for those free lunches so to speak...

One might not realise it at first, but it is easy to jeopardise ones security simply by failing to stay up to date with the latest security memo. Using outdated and unsupported (for several years now) tools is a modern day recipe for a data breach disaster. No one wants to be a victim.

Put simply: traditional data wipe tools (many "free" ones and even some of the paid!) are unable to erase 100% of data on modern storage devices because they are unable to utilize the ATA Command set. Only a product that can manage ATA can securely erase data from a modern disks hence "Secure" has become the de-facto standard prescribed by most self respecting Governmental and Defense organizations (illustrated below) worldwide for a number of years now. Who wouldn't want military grade security when selling, recycling or disposing of a computer? Nobody wants someone digging up personal information on their old PC.

Now you don't need to be an expert on the subject to benefit from others knowledge but for more information on secure erase, and why it is essential - read up on ATA Secure Erase standards and perhaps NIST 800-88 guidelines for media sanitization. Secure erase is not the only reason why you will want a dedicated, supported data wipe solution - there are a multitude of other factors too. For example, you will want it to be Certified IE: Scientifically proven to do what it claims to do by a credible independent 3rd party. You will want a Hex viewer so you can check with your own eyes that all data is actually gone. Hopefully, armed with a little more knowledge on the subject, you might begin to see the value in a certified, supported, effective data wipe solution like Redkey.
 
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f33dm3bits

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With that logic you have the pay for every piece of software that is of good quality, using dd to write zeros to your drive is good enough and if not writing random data will do it. If that is not good enough and you are that paranoid you won't be giving or selling your drive to someone else. Then you can just stick your drive in the microwave for a minute or so on and then let it soak in a bucket of salt water for a day. The average person doesn't know how to recover data so it doesn't really matter what tool you use unless you are doing something illegal and have the government investigating you or another special situation.
 
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KGIII

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I saw this last night. I almost reported it as spam - but someone above (back when the thread was new) actually recommended this device.

I'm on the side of @f33dm3bits. If I needed something like this, I'd just destroy my hard drives before any devices left my ownership. I'd otherwise use DBAN and call it good.

When I gift an old computer to someone or donate it, I hit it with DBAN and then install a clean distro with a no-password enabled default user account. If I remember, I'll leave a text file on the desktop to tell them how to password protect their account and point out the still-valid Windows key affixed to the side of the case.
 

wizardfromoz

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but everyone knows there is no such thing as a free lunch.

I hope that includes yourself, @Redkey :), and welcome to linux.org.

I was the one who approved your entry Post, only because at that time the door was opened at #4 by Member @atanere , who was a Moderator at the time.

So now you have received not just one but two free lunches.

I would advocate that if you wish more coverage of your product after this Thread slips off into the back pages again, that you do the right thing and advertise with us, you could start with clicking the Contact us flag below and to the right.

Better that than grabbing a tiger by the tail with those of our Members who are well-versed in security practices, I would suggest?

I think that that is all that this Thread has to offer for now, but I will leave it open unless I have cause to reconsider that option.

Thanks all

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 
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Deleted member 101831

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Hillary Clinton used Bleachbit to wipe data and information off her cell phones and laptops so that's good enough for me.
 
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