Dell Latitude 7490 freeze at login screen if i turn it on without the usb with the installation ISO or if i safetly remove it

Tiempo

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Hello everybody!
A few days ago i got, as replacement for a stolen Laptop with Mint, a Dell Latitude 7490 with W10. So after making a little research i read somewhere that Mint and Latitude won't go well, and decide to go with Manjaro. I follow all the instruction to the best of my knowledge and got Manjaro KDE running in my system as the only OS. The problem is that whenever i turn on the machine it goes very smooth until it gets to the login screen where it full freeze: Can't move the mouse, can't write a thing, anything... And the light in the Caps Lock begun to twinkle (which meant some kind of memory problem). If i boot the system having the USB stick (where i have the ISO burned of Manjaro) pluged in everything goes perfectly (and no, i'm not in the live session, i'm working from the SSD where it is installed).

I run some hardware testing and nothing appeared to be wrong

I searched everywhere for a solution and found none for this exact problem. I tried reinstalling GRUB, triple check that it is working as a UEFI installation without Secure Boot, and tried another Kernel with no avail. So... after a lot of frustration i decided to try Mint (worst case scenario, i would have to go back to W10) and... it happened all again.

Sometimes it takes a few seconds and i can actually log in, sometimes it happens right away, but if the stick is there, all goes perfect until i decide to remove it. After that it could, again, happens right away or it could take more time or, in a very strange moment, not happen at all (or take more time than my observation time).

I'm very lost with this as it feels as if that USB is now some kind of security key for a car with electricity lock

Thanks!!!

Here goes my specs in case you know of some incompatibilities:

System:
Kernel: 5.19.0-28-generic x86_64 bits: 64 compiler: N/A Desktop: Cinnamon 5.6.7 tk: GTK 3.24.33
wm: muffin dm: LightDM Distro: Linux Mint 21.1 Vera base: Ubuntu 22.04 jammy
Machine:
Type: Laptop System: Dell product: Latitude 7490 v: N/A serial: <superuser required> Chassis:
type: 10 serial: <superuser required>
Mobo: Dell model: 0KP0FT v: A00 serial: <superuser required> UEFI: Dell v: 1.24.1
date: 01/24/2022
Battery:
ID-1: BAT0 charge: 34.4 Wh (79.4%) condition: 43.3/60.0 Wh (72.2%) volts: 8.4 min: 7.6
model: LGC-LGC7.780 DELL 2X39G88 serial: <filter> status: Charging
CPU:
Info: quad core model: Intel Core i7-8650U bits: 64 type: MT MCP arch: Coffee Lake rev: A cache:
L1: 256 KiB L2: 1024 KiB L3: 8 MiB
Speed (MHz): avg: 1200 high: 1201 min/max: 400/4200 cores: 1: 1200 2: 1200 3: 1200 4: 1200
5: 1200 6: 1200 7: 1201 8: 1200 bogomips: 33599
Flags: avx avx2 ht lm nx pae sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 ssse3 vmx
Graphics:
Device-1: Intel UHD Graphics 620 vendor: Dell driver: i915 v: kernel ports: active: eDP-1
empty: DP-1,HDMI-A-1,HDMI-A-2 bus-ID: 00:02.0 chip-ID: 8086:5917
Device-2: Sunplus Innovation Integrated_Webcam_HD type: USB driver: uvcvideo bus-ID: 1-5:2
chip-ID: 1bcf:2b96
Display: x11 server: X.Org v: 1.21.1.3 driver: X: loaded: modesetting unloaded: fbdev,vesa
gpu: i915 display-ID: :0 screens: 1
Screen-1: 0 s-res: 1920x1080 s-dpi: 96
Monitor-1: eDP-1 model: Chi Mei Innolux res: 1920x1080 dpi: 158 diag: 354mm (13.9")
OpenGL: renderer: Mesa Intel UHD Graphics 620 (KBL GT2) v: 4.6 Mesa 22.0.5 direct render: Yes
Audio:
Device-1: Intel Sunrise Point-LP HD Audio vendor: Dell driver: snd_hda_intel v: kernel
bus-ID: 00:1f.3 chip-ID: 8086:9d71
Sound Server-1: ALSA v: k5.19.0-28-generic running: yes
Sound Server-2: PulseAudio v: 15.99.1 running: yes
Sound Server-3: PipeWire v: 0.3.48 running: yes
Network:
Device-1: Intel Ethernet I219-LM vendor: Dell driver: e1000e v: kernel port: N/A bus-ID: 00:1f.6
chip-ID: 8086:15d7
IF: enp0s31f6 state: down mac: <filter>
Device-2: Intel Wireless 8265 / 8275 driver: iwlwifi v: kernel pcie: speed: 2.5 GT/s lanes: 1
bus-ID: 02:00.0 chip-ID: 8086:24fd
IF: wlp2s0 state: up mac: <filter>
Bluetooth:
Device-1: Intel Bluetooth wireless interface type: USB driver: btusb v: 0.8 bus-ID: 1-7:3
chip-ID: 8087:0a2b
Report: hciconfig ID: hci0 rfk-id: 4 state: up address: <filter> bt-v: 2.1 lmp-v: 4.2
sub-v: 100
Drives:
Local Storage: total: 505.81 GiB used: 25.76 GiB (5.1%)
ID-1: /dev/nvme0n1 vendor: Toshiba model: KBG40ZNS512G NVMe KIOXIA 512GB size: 476.94 GiB
speed: 31.6 Gb/s lanes: 4 serial: <filter> temp: 30.9 C
ID-2: /dev/sda type: USB vendor: Kingston model: DataTraveler 3.0 size: 28.87 GiB
serial: <filter>
Partition:
ID-1: / size: 467.89 GiB used: 12.88 GiB (2.8%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/nvme0n1p2
ID-2: /boot/efi size: 511 MiB used: 5.2 MiB (1.0%) fs: vfat dev: /dev/nvme0n1p1
Swap:
ID-1: swap-1 type: file size: 2 GiB used: 0 KiB (0.0%) priority: -2 file: /swapfile
Sensors:
System Temperatures: cpu: 41.0 C pch: 38.0 C mobo: 38.0 C
Fan Speeds (RPM): cpu: 0
Repos:
Packages: apt: 2179
No active apt repos in: /etc/apt/sources.list
Active apt repos in: /etc/apt/sources.list.d/official-package-repositories.list
1: deb https: //mirror1.cl.netactuate.com/linuxmint/packages vera main upstream import backport
2: deb https: //mirror.hnd.cl/ubuntu jammy main restricted universe multiverse
3: deb https: //mirror.hnd.cl/ubuntu jammy-updates main restricted universe multiverse
4: deb https: //mirror.hnd.cl/ubuntu jammy-backports main restricted universe multiverse
5: deb http: //security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ jammy-security main restricted universe multiverse
Info:
Processes: 280 Uptime: 3h 10m Memory: 11.44 GiB used: 3.36 GiB (29.3%) Init: systemd v: 249
runlevel: 5 Compilers: gcc: 11.3.0 alt: 11 Client: Cinnamon v: 5.6.7 inxi: 3.3.13
 


Welcome to the forums, If you like Mint, then try the LMDE version.
Before installing, did you Disable windows quick-start & safe boot in the BIOS/UEFI and re-boot the machine
Oh and to complete the installation you need to remove the usb and re-boot when instaucted
 
Hi and thanks!

Yes to safe boot, almost sure i did it for quick start as i found something equivalent in my BIOS/UEFI
 
as i found something equivalent in my BIOS/UEFI
Different manufacturers may call it something slightly different fast-boot is another common description
 
Just to add your new to your lappy is either late 2017 or 2018 machine and so should not have the problems of latitude's made in the last couple of years
 
G'day Tiempo, Welcome to Linux.org

Just to add to what Brickwizard said above re your lappy is either late 2017 or 2018 machine and so should not have the problems of latitude's made in the last couple of years......

If you get frustrated with manjaro....give yourself a break and install Linux Mint
 
Tiempo wrote:
The problem is that whenever i turn on the machine it goes very smooth until it gets to the login screen where it full freeze: Can't move the mouse, can't write a thing,
You can try and login in text mode by booting to the text prompt and logging in there with username and password. Navigate about the system and if all seems okay in text mode, then the issue likely moves to the display manager or graphics card and software associated with the GUI.

From text mode you could start up the GUI with the command: startx, or whatever command will start your X session. If that goes smoothly, then the problem could possibly be the display manager. Display managers can be replaced by installing others on the system and configuring them to be the default. The ones I'm familiar with which have worked in different contexts are lightdm, sddm, and gdm. There are others.

To boot to text mode hit e when the grub menu appears, navigate down to the linux line, add the number 3 to the linux line after a space and hit cntl+x to boot. You can also configure your system to boot to text from a running system by using the systemd, e.g.: systemctl set-default multi-user.target.

the light in the Caps Lock begun to twinkle (which meant some kind of memory problem).

If there's the suggestion of a memory problem you can test the memory with the memtest86+ program from an rescue disk, or if you install it on your system, grub should offer to run it at boot up so that you check the integrity of the memory.

If i boot the system having the USB stick (where i have the ISO burned of Manjaro) pluged in everything goes perfectly (and no, i'm not in the live session, i'm working from the SSD where it is installed).

Normally one removes the usb after installation and reboots. If you left the usb in the system and rebooted, it depends on the installation media as to what happens and I can't say what it might be in this case. Sometimes the new boot with the usb in the socket will simply run the installer again, and at other times, there may some more intelligent software letting you know that it should be removed. I can't say in this case, but the system should not be dependent on the usb being in the socket.

I run some hardware testing and nothing appeared to be wrong

What hardware testing was this and how did it show nothing to be wrong? Information is important from logs from the dmesg command and also from the journalctl command to check both for errors, missing firmware and warnings. These can be run from text mode. With the journalctl command the user can choose to see the last boot, the current boot etc, so you need the data from the boot that lead to the freeze.

I tried reinstalling GRUB,
If you get to login, grub may be fine. Grub tends to complain if it has a problem and will likely then throw you into a grub shell or a grub rescue shell, which you are not reporting.

Sometimes it takes a few seconds and i can actually log in, sometimes it happens right away ... if the stick is there, all goes perfect until i decide to remove it.
As mentioned, the usb stick should not be a dependency.

Intel UHD Graphics 620 vendor: Dell driver: i915
You could check to see that you have the latest available intel firmware for the i915 driver. It's in the firmware-misc-nonfree package in the debian family distros. Can't vouch for the others.

In general the practice of having everything updated as much as possible helps since it's the latest versions of software that tend to resolve issues of the earlier versions.

A final thought: hunt deeply online for others with the same model laptop and linux issues.
 
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Hi you all!!

First, thanks for all your answers! I wil try text booting to see what happens.

If there's the suggestion of a memory problem you can test the memory with the memtest86+ program from an rescue disk, or if you install it on your system, grub should offer to run it at boot up so that you check the integrity of the memory.

Great! gonna try this.

Normally one removes the usb after installation and reboots. If you left the usb in the system and rebooted, it depends on the installation media as to what happens and I can't say what it might be in this case. Sometimes the new boot with the usb in the socket will simply run the installer again, and at other times, there may some more intelligent software letting you know that it should be removed. I can't say in this case, but the system should not be dependent on the usb being in the socket.

Absolutely! that is the problem:
- OS is installed
- USB stick is retired as per Mint/Manjaro instructions
- System is rebooted
- System freezes at loading screen as soon as i get there. Sometimes it goes beyond there and i can log in but, eventually, it freezes
-I hard reset the laptop and put the USB stick. The problem is no more


Soooo.... I have no idea what's going on, because if it is a memory problem... why leaving a USB stick should "solve" it?

What hardware testing was this and how did it show nothing to be wrong? Information is important from logs from the dmesg command and also from the journalctl command to check both for errors, missing firmware and warnings. These can be run from text mode. With the journalctl command the user can choose to see the last boot, the current boot etc, so you need the data from the boot that lead to the freeze.

Latitud came with a selftest that runs for everything, from screen colors to CPU stressing. I will reboot this without the USB stick and paste the journal here
As mentioned, the usb stick should not be a dependency.

I know! But try to explain it to my Laptop hahahaha
You could check to see that you have the latest available intel firmware for the i915 driver. It's in the firmware-misc-nonfree package in the debian family distros. Can't vouch for the others.
Thanks!
 
Ok, so you now have Linux Mint 21.1...correct?....and the usb stcik has been taken out and the system rebooted.

I note you are using kernel 5.19.0-28-generic

Shift the kernel back to 5.15.0-58

Worth a try seeing everything else is falling in a heap.
 

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I am wondering if he finalised the Mint installation, by removing the pen-drive and re-booting when asked.
 
Time will tell. Hopefully.
 
I am wondering if he finalised the Mint installation, by removing the pen-drive and re-booting when asked.
Yep, i did. Remember is not my first machine with Mint
Ok, so you now have Linux Mint 21.1...correct?....and the usb stcik has been taken out and the system rebooted.

I note you are using kernel 5.19.0-28-generic

Shift the kernel back to 5.15.0-58

Worth a try seeing everything else is falling in a heap.
Ok, gonna give it a try (but in manjaro it didn't make a change)

EDIT: Kernel change didn't make a difference. But, two things happened: i noticed that the caps lock light doesn't blink since i installed Mint (i started to recollect when was the last time i saw it blink), and that the laptop can freeze during start up even if the USB is putted when i changed the kernel, but this last thing happened only the first time i restarted the machine

EDIT 2: Also i change the display manager to SDDM before Kernel change.



I'm going to attach both journal -r and dmesg results here (Pre Kernel change)
 

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