Do Linux users have.. a life?

astralpr0jector

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I'd like to start this thread by saying I am in no way taking sides between operating systems and I, a Windows user, has recently switched to Linux Mint. So any of the things I say against Linux, I'm technically making fun of myself because I have, for good, decided to switch to Linux.

The reason I'm creating this thread is: I want to know if there will be an end to this nightmare... or will I literally have to sell my soul to the linux devil to be able to install software without spending 2 hours of googling/updating repositories/troubleshooting/etc.

Yes, the rage is real.

This is my first week on Linux - and gee...
Its been.. a very rough experience.
But I shall keep going through this path...

Whenever I run into a problem on Linux, my algorithm of moves is like:
1. Linux course (you should have not initially been in this situation if you had a systematic education)
2. Googling/Youtubing (and entering random sh*t into the terminal that people say, which might not only have had a different context, but might cause some serious damage to the Linux machine)
3. Posting the question on Forums (linux.org btw, is one of the most helpful forums I have recieved support from)

The result is that, any kind of problem I run into - takes around 2-3 hours of solving in the best case. In the worst, I go sleep depressed and tired - and all my usual computer jobs that I do are not even begun yet.

I was just wondering,
As you get more advanced in Linux - are you able to solve some very random problems such as "Dependency Is Not satisfiable" via some systematic method without the need to google/forum ask?
Or do Linux users generally have no life and like to read and type a lot.
 


f33dm3bits

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If you are switching from Windows to GNU/Linux it will take a while to get used to because you will need to learn to have a different mindset because things are done differently because it's a totally different system then Windows. I'm pretty sure you didn't know how to use Windows when you rolled out of the crib, it depends on how much time you plan to spend tinkering around as in how fast you will learn and understand how things work: The best way to learn is to set small goals at a time for yourself and see them as projects, work on learning and figuring how the things you do for your daily tasks first. I've been running GNU/Linux for some time and I can for the most party figure out the stuff I need for myself, it's harder to help harder people on forums such as these who are having problems but I do my best.
 

Condobloke

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Or do Linux users generally have no life and like to read and type a lot.
G'day Astral, and Welcome to Linux.org

Mate, you have already taken sides....because you are here !

May I ask, which country are you from ?...I ask because I am wondering why you chose to try and download a Russian typewriter thingie ?
You have @wizardfromoz (another Aussie) helping you in that topic.....you are indeed in good hands....he will sort the wheat from the chaff for you.

Try : https://alternativeto.net/

Be sure to explore it thoroughly
(just a bit more reading for you)

I can understand the rage......Most if not all of the members here have experienced that/are still experiencing that at some stage. It is a necessary part to come to finally understand the beast.

Having said that, I have been with Linux for around 7 years, and there is still a monumental amount I still do not understand. By the same token, there is a monumental amount I do not want to understand.....I am quite happy with knowledge/abilities thus far.

You wrote...."
This is my first week on Linux - and gee...
Its been.. a very rough experience.""

....and I can guarantee there are people curled up on the floor laughing......Why?....because that is the same experience they had themselves.

My mate, @f33dm3bits has just answered above this reply.....he is a man of few words, but pay attention to the words !....he really knows his stuff.

One thing I can guarantee is this......the friendliness and sincere cooperation you will receive here will leave any other forum in the world for dead.

Again...Welcome.
 

MatsuShimizu

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I'd like to start this thread by saying I am in no way taking sides between operating systems and I, a Windows user, has recently switched to Linux Mint.
I also switched from Windows to Ubuntu Linux and I'm happy with the decision. Yes, I agree that you need to search a lot on Google/DuckDuckGo for solutions but in my case, most problems are solved instantly just by Googling.
 

Condobloke

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Without knowing which Linux OS you are running......

In Linux Mint 20.1 (which I run) i looked in SOftware Manager and found a thing called Klavaro .... which has 4.3 stars out of a possible 5...from 30 people

"Klavaro is a simple tutor to teach correct typing, almost independently of language and very flexible regarding to new or unknown keyboard layouts "

Klavaro.png
 

70 Tango Charlie

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Greetings @astralpr0jector and welcome to the forum.
Wow, you have been at Linux Mint for a whole week and have not got it figured out yet? LOL.
What a disturbing state of affairs that is.
Your feelings are exactly what should be expected from someone coming from a Windows background. I was there from 1993 until about 4-5 years ago.
One thing people need to understand about Linux - the price for the operating may be zero dollars but the cost of the operating system is the time it takes to learn about it. Price and cost are two different things. Remember - there is a cost to everything in life. Nothing is excepted.
Can it be frustrating? Certainly! But, what can be gained from going through the frustration of learning and then seeing the light at the end of the tunnel.
In case you are interested - I am 86 years old and still learning a whole lot about the Linux atmosphere. It cannot be learned overnight and no one can learn it for you. You have to put in the time and hard work in order to get the satisfaction and enjoyment of using a system that really does belong to you.
Enough of this Old Geezers' rant.
We really do welcome you with open arms here at this forum. If you have any specific questions about any part of the Linux system ask away. Someone here will have the answer to help you learn.
Just an Old Geezer Tango Charlie blowing off some more steam!!! LOL.
 

astralpr0jector

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>> Condobloke

Thank you for your warm welcome and detailed answer.

I am Canadian. It's just that my friend showed me that Stamina software when I was a kid and I like the background music, reminds me of my childhood. It also has these sounds effects when you make a mistake which I find funny and actually help you learn better.

At first I just wanted to install to learn typing, but when it wasn't working - I took it as a challenge to use this problem as a way to learn how to deal with other problems in linux.



: https://alternativeto.net/ Will do

And yeah, I guess one of the reasons Linux is more difficult is because it gives you more control over things. Kind of like a manual window opener in a car and an automatic one - when the car battery dies you won't be able to use the automatic one.
 

LorenDB

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Without knowing which Linux OS you are running......

In Linux Mint 20.1 (which I run) i looked in SOftware Manager and found a thing called Klavaro .... which has 4.3 stars out of a possible 5...from 30 people

"Klavaro is a simple tutor to teach correct typing, almost independently of language and very flexible regarding to new or unknown keyboard layouts "

View attachment 8336
Also check out KTouch.
 

astralpr0jector

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Can it be frustrating? Certainly! But, what can be gained from going through the frustration of learning and then seeing the light at the end of the tunnel.

>> This is what I was hoping to hear. That there indeed is a light at the end of the tunnel. I was beginning to think Linux is just a punishment some forum administrator made because he wanted people to learn how to research things on google.



In case you are interested - I am 86 years old and still learning a whole lot about the Linux atmosphere. It cannot be learned overnight and no one can learn it for you. You have to put in the time and hard work in order to get the satisfaction and enjoyment of using a system that really does belong to you.

Wow. That's very impressive.
Would you recommend taking courses for a general/systematic viewpoint on everything, or learning it as you deal with daily tasks/work for a more practical approach?
 

70 Tango Charlie

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Your approach may differ from mine, as I am more of a learn by watching and doing type. If you learn well in a classroom atmosphere then a structured form might suit you better. Looking back, I think I was about 13 years old when I came to realize that I did not learn too well in a structured class. {I since have found, after doing proof-reading for about the last 20 years, that there are many poor writers out there. Thankfully there are many good ones too.}
I seem to do better when I can fiddle with something to see how it works. If I break it, I pay in time to fix or replace it and learn from the so-called failure.
There is a website that has thousands of free books. You can take a look and see if any of them strike your interest. https://b-ok.cc/s/linux. I believe it's called Z Library Online Book store. If you go there just type in on the big search bar "Linux" and there will be a whole lot of books available for free that pop up. There is one that caught my attention called "The Linux Bible (Ninth Edition)" by Christopher Negus (z-lib.org).pdf. It is a very informative and complete manual on Linux for anyone from beginner to advanced learner. I have downloaded many of the books available on this site - some good and some not so good.
I'm sure you will find something there that interests you.
Your 'new' friend, the Old Geezer TC
 

astralpr0jector

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That is a very good point you made.
That it depends on habits. Similarly to you, I didn't do well in school and not so good in structured form of education.
My mind needs constant rewards or at least some kind of signals that I'm getting close to the goal.
 

Condobloke

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I am not sure that anyone actually answered your initial question "do Linux users have a life".....the quote below is something I wrote on another forum in 2016, ...

I like to help in win 10. They are the people who really need help....those in Linux also need help...but not with the same desperation. Linux, when compared to win 10 at a strictly user level is actually quite boring. rarely does anything go wrong ! The constant need to be alert to the slightest hiccup is definitely restricted to Windows....and in particular Windows 10

The emphasis in win 10 is to keep the os running and stable enough to start again tomorrow.....The emphasis in Linux is to look for something new to do.


I think that answers your question.
 

70 Tango Charlie

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That is a very good point you made.
That it depends on habits. Similarly to you, I didn't do well in school and not so good in structured form of education.
My mind needs constant rewards or at least some kind of signals that I'm getting close to the goal.
When I was young, I had a difficult time finishing any project that took a lot of time to complete.
Around 1965 {when I took up flying} I discovered that trait in me. I could not go for a lesson once a week. I had to compact the learning time so I took a lesson 3 or 4 days a week just so I would not 'get rusty' or so I thought.
Since coming to Linux, I have been able to do better on being patient.
OG
 

digitard

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When I figure out how to use this OS I will make a blog with all my notes, in keep notes anyway when I find a solution, this time i can see a reason to keep public notes. They don't want me in the Debian forum at all, I can't even register there, they think I'm spam, bot, and malware at the same time. Wise people no jokes. What you are looking for is people that you can get along, laugh with the same jokes etc, When you find people you get help, it takes time.
 

jglen490

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I'd like to start this thread by saying I am in no way taking sides between operating systems and I, a Windows user, has recently switched to Linux Mint. So any of the things I say against Linux, I'm technically making fun of myself because I have, for good, decided to switch to Linux.

The reason I'm creating this thread is: I want to know if there will be an end to this nightmare... or will I literally have to sell my soul to the linux devil to be able to install software without spending 2 hours of googling/updating repositories/troubleshooting/etc.

Yes, the rage is real.

This is my first week on Linux - and gee...
Its been.. a very rough experience.
But I shall keep going through this path...

Whenever I run into a problem on Linux, my algorithm of moves is like:
1. Linux course (you should have not initially been in this situation if you had a systematic education)
2. Googling/Youtubing (and entering random sh*t into the terminal that people say, which might not only have had a different context, but might cause some serious damage to the Linux machine)
3. Posting the question on Forums (linux.org btw, is one of the most helpful forums I have recieved support from)

The result is that, any kind of problem I run into - takes around 2-3 hours of solving in the best case. In the worst, I go sleep depressed and tired - and all my usual computer jobs that I do are not even begun yet.

I was just wondering,
As you get more advanced in Linux - are you able to solve some very random problems such as "Dependency Is Not satisfiable" via some systematic method without the need to google/forum ask?
Or do Linux users generally have no life and like to read and type a lot.
Anything new requires a learning curve. You get to shape that curve to whatever you want. Use your brain, even though you may not have a great knowledge base. Be curious, rather than combative.

My first run with Linux a couple of decades ago, was completely a battle. And that battle didn't make any sense. So I changed to a different (more "friendly") version, and suddenly Linux began to make sense.

My "first" was an old Slackware (with a million 3.5" floppies), in the days when Slackware enthusiasts were high nose, elitist, and really crabby. My more friendly one was a boxed Red Hat 5.2 (pre-RHEL) set with actual instructions and explanations. What a joy. Now I had a working and useful Linux, within which I could actually learn some of the innards of Linux and not feel like I had been through combat.

Bottom line, if your current Linux is not satisfying, try another - there are hundreds.

And, yes, I have a really good life :cool:
 

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