Dual Booting causing failure to boot into either OS

Jaylu

New Member
Hello, am hoping someone here can help me out with this please....

For a week I was booting into Linux (Lubuntu 18.04 persistent install) , using a super fast Sandisk Extreme Pro usb drive, on a 2011 Windows 7 host machine. (MBR, bios).

I have experienced a few times since I began dual booting in this way, that the machine failed to boot, regardless of what system I was trying to boot into. No logo flashed up, just a black screen. I tried waiting for 15 minutes once, but the machine didn't manage to sort itself out.

Each time it happened I shutdown using the power button, and removed the USB but this didn't help. When powered up again still just a black screen.
When this happens power light shows power is on. I can hear sounds of the system working. Then silence.

I found a temporary fix (after shutting down, remove power cord, external keyboard, mouse, and screen, remove battery, hold power button down 15 secs). My first question is whether continuing like this could eventually permanently destroy the ability of my laptop to boot again?

Haven't booted into Lubuntu for a few days, and the issue hasn't occurred.

The machine and peripherals are the same as I used when dual booting with Mint Cinnamon for a few months last year. Lubuntu is fresh install on same USB, which was completely re-formatted.

Secondly, is there a way to fix the issue so the laptop always boots?

Although I have had some previous experience of dual-booting, best to treat me as a beginner, as I am a self taught home user regarding anything computer related, and have large chunks of knowledge missing.

Thanks
 


wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
I am a self taught home user regarding anything computer related, and have large chunks of knowledge missing.
Sounds like me.



(Wizard appears in a puff of smoke)


G'day from DownUnder, @Jaylu and welcome to linux.org :)

Mate let's just clarify a few points -
  1. Is Win 7 the only OS installed to your hard drive?
  2. And you have either a full install of Lubuntu to the USB stick, or you have Lubuntu burned to the stick, with Persistence enabled?
  3. Or other?
  4. Have you got your Win7 Recovery plan in place (with an install DVD or USB stick), and your personal data safeguarded, in case anything heads south for the winter?
  5. Can you give us the specs of the lappie? eg Brand, Name and Model Number?
I'd also like to see some info from your Windows 7, as per the following article - scroll down to the part saying Method 2

https://www.easyuefi.com/resource/check-windows-is-booted-in-uefi-mode.html

I'll be around for an hour or so before I have to start cooking tea, then back tomorrow.

Meanwhile we have a number of very capable people who might come along to help.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 

Jaylu

New Member
Win 64 system info.jpg

Thanks for your reply, do you prefer people here call you Chris or Wizard of Oz? How about Wizard for short :)
It's a legacy bios, definitely not UEFI, sorry I didn't make that clear.
I've only got windows 7 on my hard drive. Lubuntu is a full install on a USB stick, not a live one.
Laptop is an Asus EEPC 1215B.
Yes, I've got various recovery options, and full backup. Was just about to make a fresh one, then when I had the abovementioned troubles I decided just to use windows for a few days to see whether it was running ok or not, while waiting for new backup drive to arrive.
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

Active Member
G'day @Jaylu Welcome to the community.
I be just a watchin' to learn as I have no real experience to speak of dual booting a computer.
I notice that you come from the Eastern side of the Land Down Under, where my dreaming began as well.
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

Active Member
hopefully someone will come up with a solution soon
I hope so as I am thinking of going dual boot on my HP Pavilion D6v laptop and having a heads up on your problem may save me some frustration should it do some thing similar to what yours is doing.
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

Active Member
I just came across this video by Chris Titus Tech on Super grub
@wizardfromoz or others may have a better understanding about Super grub


Chris Titus does mention it has GUI interface but he prefers to use terminal.
Watch it you may learn something.
 

Alexzee

Active Member
This is just a suggestion. You don't have to do this if you don't want to.

If you install Lubuntu alongside of Windows you would have a Grub Menu that would allow you to choose which os you want to boot into.

You could tell the installer that comes with Lubuntu to install alongside of Windows OR>
you could go into Disk Management and shrink your Windows partition to make room for your Linux installation.

If you decide to install Lubuntu the first time you boot into it make sure you run this command as root (sudo update-grub) so your Windows os shows up in the Grub Menu.

Another thought-:cool:
Sometimes the little circuit boards inside of the usb sticks go bad and they stop working over time.
Maybe try getting your usb stick with the full Lubuntu install on it and try it on another machine.

Check in your BIOS under boot order and see if it's set to boot directly into the usb stick.
In other words, make sure that the first choice in the BIOS boot section is set to the usb option.
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Aussie, Aussie, Aussie, oi oi oi - I'm from Queensland.

Regrets on the delays, I am working on two large projects for two members, one of them in need of help before his system falls over.

Thanks for the info from msinfo32.exe for Win 7. One things Win 7's version lacks, introduced in Win 8 and in Win 10, is whether UEFI or BIOS.

I know you have said that your system is legacy bios, but humour me with the following:

See

https://www.easyuefi.com/resource/check-windows-is-booted-in-uefi-mode.html

You have already used Method 1, but with that item missing in Win7, so scroll down to

Method 2: Check if UEFI or Legacy BIOS Mode in setupact.log in Windows 7, 8, and 10

and follow that through for me, and report back.

Reason I ask is that at face value the AMD E350 Processor 1.6 Ghz supports UEFI.

Regarding your main issue:

When you created your full install stick, you would likely have had 2 sticks - one with the Lubuntu .iso burned to stick from your download, perhaps using Rufus or Etcher or other, and the target stick which now houses your Lubuntu install.

Is that so?

If you like what you have seen of Lubuntu, and want to stick with it, I would be inclined to go with a "proper" dual boot, and that is, install Lubuntu alongside Windows. Unless you want to give Windows the flick and replace it with Lubuntu.

Either of those options will give you an enhanced performance over the USB stick.

@Nik-Ken-Bah - watched the video, Davy, I like his style. I am a little familiar with RescaTux but not Super Grub.

I ignore the bit on Grub Customizer most of last 3 minutes - because it is ok for maybe 2 to 3 LInux, but a nightmare for multi-multi-booters such as me, and very difficult to uninstall all trace and effects, they can haunt you for months.

Thanks for sharing.

...do you prefer people here call you Chris or Wizard of Oz? How about Wizard for short :)
Mate you can call me anything except late for dinner.

BTW - wizardfromoz, not of Oz - Dorothy, THe Tin Man, and the Scarecrow have a mortgage on that :)

@Alexzee posted while I was writing this.

Cheers

Wiz
 

Jaylu

New Member
This is just a suggestion. You don't have to do this if you don't want to.

If you install Lubuntu alongside of Windows you would have a Grub Menu that would allow you to choose which os you want to boot into.

You could tell the installer that comes with Lubuntu to install alongside of Windows OR>
you could go into Disk Management and shrink your Windows partition to make room for your Linux installation.

If you decide to install Lubuntu the first time you boot into it make sure you run this command as root (sudo update-grub) so your Windows os shows up in the Grub Menu.

Another thought-:cool:
Sometimes the little circuit boards inside of the usb sticks go bad and they stop working over time.
Maybe try getting your usb stick with the full Lubuntu install on it and try it on another machine.

Check in your BIOS under boot order and see if it's set to boot directly into the usb stick.
In other words, make sure that the first choice in the BIOS boot section is set to the usb option.
Thanks Alexzee,
I have MBR system which only allows limited number of partitions, and all those are spoken for on my machine. So can't install Lubuntu alongside windows.

Although the USB in question was only used for about 10 months total when I had Mint Cinnamon on it late 2017
Aussie, Aussie, Aussie, oi oi oi - I'm from Queensland.

Regrets on the delays, I am working on two large projects for two members, one of them in need of help before his system falls over.

Thanks for the info from msinfo32.exe for Win 7. One things Win 7's version lacks, introduced in Win 8 and in Win 10, is whether UEFI or BIOS.

I know you have said that your system is legacy bios, but humour me with the following:

See

https://www.easyuefi.com/resource/check-windows-is-booted-in-uefi-mode.html

You have already used Method 1, but with that item missing in Win7, so scroll down to

Method 2: Check if UEFI or Legacy BIOS Mode in setupact.log in Windows 7, 8, and 10

and follow that through for me, and report back.

Reason I ask is that at face value the AMD E350 Processor 1.6 Ghz supports UEFI.

Regarding your main issue:

When you created your full install stick, you would likely have had 2 sticks - one with the Lubuntu .iso burned to stick from your download, perhaps using Rufus or Etcher or other, and the target stick which now houses your Lubuntu install.

Is that so?

If you like what you have seen of Lubuntu, and want to stick with it, I would be inclined to go with a "proper" dual boot, and that is, install Lubuntu alongside Windows. Unless you want to give Windows the flick and replace it with Lubuntu.

Either of those options will give you an enhanced performance over the USB stick.

@Nik-Ken-Bah - watched the video, Davy, I like his style. I am a little familiar with RescaTux but not Super Grub.

I ignore the bit on Grub Customizer most of last 3 minutes - because it is ok for maybe 2 to 3 LInux, but a nightmare for multi-multi-booters such as me, and very difficult to uninstall all trace and effects, they can haunt you for months.

Thanks for sharing.



Mate you can call me anything except late for dinner.

BTW - wizardfromoz, not of Oz - Dorothy, THe Tin Man, and the Scarecrow have a mortgage on that :)

@Alexzee posted while I was writing this.

Cheers

Wiz
Aussie, Aussie, Aussie, oi oi oi - I'm from Queensland.

Regrets on the delays, I am working on two large projects for two members, one of them in need of help before his system falls over.

Thanks for the info from msinfo32.exe for Win 7. One things Win 7's version lacks, introduced in Win 8 and in Win 10, is whether UEFI or BIOS.

I know you have said that your system is legacy bios, but humour me with the following:

See

https://www.easyuefi.com/resource/check-windows-is-booted-in-uefi-mode.html

You have already used Method 1, but with that item missing in Win7, so scroll down to

Method 2: Check if UEFI or Legacy BIOS Mode in setupact.log in Windows 7, 8, and 10

and follow that through for me, and report back.

Reason I ask is that at face value the AMD E350 Processor 1.6 Ghz supports UEFI.

Regarding your main issue:

When you created your full install stick, you would likely have had 2 sticks - one with the Lubuntu .iso burned to stick from your download, perhaps using Rufus or Etcher or other, and the target stick which now houses your Lubuntu install.

Is that so?

If you like what you have seen of Lubuntu, and want to stick with it, I would be inclined to go with a "proper" dual boot, and that is, install Lubuntu alongside Windows. Unless you want to give Windows the flick and replace it with Lubuntu.

Either of those options will give you an enhanced performance over the USB stick.

@Nik-Ken-Bah - watched the video, Davy, I like his style. I am a little familiar with RescaTux but not Super Grub.

I ignore the bit on Grub Customizer most of last 3 minutes - because it is ok for maybe 2 to 3 LInux, but a nightmare for multi-multi-booters such as me, and very difficult to uninstall all trace and effects, they can haunt you for months.

Thanks for sharing.



Mate you can call me anything except late for dinner.

BTW - wizardfromoz, not of Oz - Dorothy, THe Tin Man, and the Scarecrow have a mortgage on that :)

@Alexzee posted while I was writing this.

Cheers

Wiz
Yes, that's the way I installed on usb stick. Here's the confirmation this isn't a UEFI system.

Thanks Chris, see you when you can get back here. :)
 

Attachments

Jaylu

New Member
This is just a suggestion. You don't have to do this if you don't want to.

If you install Lubuntu alongside of Windows you would have a Grub Menu that would allow you to choose which os you want to boot into.

You could tell the installer that comes with Lubuntu to install alongside of Windows OR>
you could go into Disk Management and shrink your Windows partition to make room for your Linux installation.

If you decide to install Lubuntu the first time you boot into it make sure you run this command as root (sudo update-grub) so your Windows os shows up in the Grub Menu.

Another thought-:cool:
Sometimes the little circuit boards inside of the usb sticks go bad and they stop working over time.
Maybe try getting your usb stick with the full Lubuntu install on it and try it on another machine.

Check in your BIOS under boot order and see if it's set to boot directly into the usb stick.
In other words, make sure that the first choice in the BIOS boot section is set to the usb option.
Thanks Alexzee,
I have MBR system which only allows limited number of partitions, and all those are spoken for on my machine. So can't install Lubuntu alongside windows.

Although the USB in question was only used for about 10 months total when I had Mint Cinnamon on it late 2017 , it had occurred to me that problem might be with Usb, but as it was bought for the purpose and is less than 2 years old, decided to ask for help with boot issue, which many dual booters may have encountered before., possibly.

If boot order had changed by itself, without input from me, why would that cause temporary inability to boot into either OS? And be temporarily fixed in way I described?

I will check out the vid you suggest, thanks.
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Bit of duplication here - Jaylu, one of your Posts cam across my desk for approval (some glitch perhaps, with our sooftware) and I approved it as soon as I got back online.

I have MBR system which only allows limited number of partitions, and all those are spoken for on my machine. So can't install Lubuntu alongside windows.
Good news is, Oh yes, you can.

Back tomorrow and Sunday to go further. Got tea to cook.

Avagudweegend.

Wiz

BTW - use the Windows Snipping Tool to take a picture of your partition setup on Windows under Disk Management, or else GParted on your Lubuntu stick, if it works.

See my Thread here, for how to best present a picture here.

https://linux.org/threads/posting-screenshots-at-this-site-read-this-for-easy-way.21722/
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Here's the confirmation this isn't a UEFI system.
Ta for that. This is an EeePC, isn't it?

Have you ever tried upgrading the BIOS? They can be made to support UEFI - your call.

If Windows is hogging the 4 partitions under your MBR setup - one of those partitions will be unnecessary and can be deleted.

Then using GParted on a LIve install stick, you can make the unallocated space into an Extended Partition, which can then house a number of Virtual Partitions for linux.

We can get a clearer picture if you provide us a with a screenshot from your Windows Disk Management Utility.

Cheers

Wiz
 

Jaylu

New Member
Ta for that. This is an EeePC, isn't it?

Have you ever tried upgrading the BIOS? They can be made to support UEFI - your call.

If Windows is hogging the 4 partitions under your MBR setup - one of those partitions will be unnecessary and can be deleted.

Then using GParted on a LIve install stick, you can make the unallocated space into an Extended Partition, which can then house a number of Virtual Partitions for linux.

We can get a clearer picture if you provide us a with a screenshot from your Windows Disk Management Utility.

Cheers

Wiz
Hi Wiz, I'd rather keep this as simple as possible, and don't want to convert the machine to UEFI, as that could 'end in tears'. Although theoretically may be possible, in practice could be a very different story. I have kept the partitions how they are, because they are exactly how I want them.

Do you have any idea why dual booting, which hasn't been a problem before, would suddenly begin to cause boot issues? Everything is the same - same machine, same usb (possibly tired?), different distro (Lubuntu instead of Mint). I don't want to go back to Mint,.

Both Windows and Lubuntu run fine otherwise.

In the meantime, I had planned to try Zorin, and instead of wiping Lubuntu, have bought a fresh Samsung Fit plus USB. I doubt very much that Lubuntu is the cause of the boot issues, but using a fresh usb will tell us something, a chance to see whether this makes a difference to the problem. So far have only had time to make the live usb (also a fresh usb).

Would still like to hear your thoughts on the boot issue. Haven't booted into Lubuntu in the last week, just in case doing this while there's a problem, causes the boot issues to escalate.

Cheers,

Jaylu
 

Jaylu

New Member
I just came across this video by Chris Titus Tech on Super grub
@wizardfromoz or others may have a better understanding about Super grub


Chris Titus does mention it has GUI interface but he prefers to use terminal.
Watch it you may learn something.
Hello, I watched the video, but the subject doesn't deal with my issue. It wasn't a windows update that caused my boot issues, and I can still boot into either system, after doing the little fix when there's a glitch. Just seeking support to prevent glitch happening. Thank you Nik-Ken-Bah for your suggestion.
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
super fast Sandisk Extreme Pro usb drive
Is that USB 3.0 or 2.0?

I just get a 3-pack every now and then from Australia Post, of Sandisk Cruzer Glides, 16 GB each.

I flog them to death, then re-work them when they start to get "tired".

Yes, I've got various recovery options, and full backup.
With the 4 partitions being used, 2 are likely System Reserved and Recovery.

You can't delete System reserved without moving the boot files to your main system C: drive (can be done, but difficult), but given the above, you can delete the Recovery partition and it will make no difference to booting into Windows.

Do you have any idea why dual booting, which hasn't been a problem before, would suddenly begin to cause boot issues?
Nope, not at this point, regrets.

Zorin is good - I cut my multi-booting teeth including it - Zorin OS 9, with Ubuntu 14.04 and Linux Mint 17.0.

Cheers

Wizard
 

Jaylu

New Member
Ok, will ask further afield. Thank you for trying to help, I appreciate it. Have an entirely different question arising from attempt to install Zorin yesterday, but will start another thread.
 

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