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Easiest version of Linux for seniors ?

TotallyPuzzled

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I'd like to find a version of linux that doesn't drag you into fussing with command lines. I'm not a programmer in any way shape or form. I've been stuck with windows for a long time. oops ..... forgot to mention free. Thanks for your time :confused:
 


Condobloke

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G'day TotallyPuzzled, Welcome to Linux.org

kiss

keep it simple & straightforward

Linux Mint.

Rarely is there a need for work in the terminal .

99% of apps all use GUI (graphical user interface)......in other words in pics etc on the screen....what we are all used to.

Questions: what pc/laptop do you have? Do you know its specs?...or if it is a laptop do you know the make & model number?

By the way....we have many young members here who have little to no clue.....on the other hand we have an abundant senior's membership who are extremely well versed, and have learned from the ground up her at Linux.org

Don't sell yourself short.
 

kc1di

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I would have to agree with @Condobloke Mint is a good Choice. It for the most part just works out of the box. Good luck in your search.
 

bob466

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Linux Mint is an excellent Disrto for both young and old or you could also try Linux Lite as well.
happy0035.gif
 

Brickwizard

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Ok, @TotallyPuzzled
I'd like to find a version of linux that doesn't drag you into fussing with command lines. I'm not a programmer in any way shape or form. I've been stuck with windows for a long time. oops ..... forgot to mention free. Thanks for your time
there are many good distributions for the beginner with user graphical interface's things I need to know before I make any suggestions,
what is your kit [make full model number and approx age]
what is your intended use basic home computing [letters/e-mail/surfing etc] or more advanced [video/photo rendering, gaming etc]
You may think you're too old to change, But we have many members over 70 [me included] and quite a few are also newish to Linux, I won't kid you, you will have a learning curve, and depending on your Kit you may have installation problems, but in most cases we can talk you through it,
so more info please.
please see my signature below
 

forester

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This ferenos is a free version of GNU/Linux designed to make the transition from the dominant OS easier for those inured in windoze -- ferenos -- and, unlike Zorin, it won't try to charge you money.

Most here feel mint is the cat's meow, but I feel feren is more like what you may be looking for.

Be aware that, IME, it runs best on a PC with 8 GB RAM and a multi-core processor of 2 GHz or better.
 

charlie.corder

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I'd like to find a version of linux that doesn't drag you into fussing with command lines. I'm not a programmer in any way shape or form. I've been stuck with windows for a long time. oops ..... forgot to mention free. Thanks for your time :confused:
Greetings @TotallyPuzzled ,
From one old Geezer to another, {I'm 87}, welcome to one of the best Linux forums on the internet.
My personal experience is as follows {as near as I remember it}:
Started with computers around 1993 with Windows 3.1. Stayed with Windows until about 2016, when I found out about Linux.
I tried different distributions, somewhere around 15 to 20.
The one I found was the easiest to transition to from Windows is Linux Mint.
At that point I was totally ignorant of the command line and was only interested in using the point and click method using icons.
At the start, I never touched the Terminal {command line}.
Today, anyone can install Linux without using the Terminal.
Some time in the future - after you have gotten your feet wet - and get familiar with how Linux works, you may want to expand your horizons a little more.
In the mean time, wander over to here:
See if this is what you may want, and then follow the directions you find there.
One thing I must warn you about - you must be willing to read things carefully, and not just skimming over. {That part took me quite a while to accept and digest!}
Once more - Welcome! - and enjoy your new experience in Linux.

From one Old Geezer to Another,
Tango Charlie

PS If you have any questions, here is the place you will get answers.
 

CrazedNerd

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The less software, the less frustration. Ubuntu, mint, and fedora are fine for browsing the internet, and even contain drivers for monitor speakers. There's a whole slew of much simpler versions of Linux too, but just cuz you're old doesn't make you simple!
 

darry1966

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I am going to take the unusual step of recommending one distrol here: Linux Lite - Has a graphical wizard at the start when you get to the desktop - helping you to configure it......

 

KGIII

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While you were more specific than many, I'll point out that almost all mainstream distros require little terminal (command line) use. You can use them graphically just fine. Alternatively, you can learn to use a few terminal commands and life might be a little faster/easier. But, again, in any mainstream distro you're not going to need to use the command line. If you do, assuming your needs are simple, it's easy enough to search for the command.

I'll point out that the mainstream distros have one great thing - that is an abundance of support options and pages and pages written about them and the problem's you'll encounter. As such, a distro that's based on Ubuntu, or Ubuntu (or an official flavor), would be wise choices.

As you're coming from Windows, I'd suggest giving Lubuntu a try. I admit my biases, as I'm on the dev team.

 

CrazedNerd

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While you were more specific than many, I'll point out that almost all mainstream distros require little terminal (command line) use. You can use them graphically just fine. Alternatively, you can learn to use a few terminal commands and life might be a little faster/easier. But, again, in any mainstream distro you're not going to need to use the command line. If you do, assuming your needs are simple, it's easy enough to search for the command.

I'll point out that the mainstream distros have one great thing - that is an abundance of support options and pages and pages written about them and the problem's you'll encounter. As such, a distro that's based on Ubuntu, or Ubuntu (or an official flavor), would be wise choices.

As you're coming from Windows, I'd suggest giving Lubuntu a try. I admit my biases, as I'm on the dev team.

That's another point I wanted to make, sometimes command line is easier than clicking.
 

KGIII

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That's another point I wanted to make, sometimes command line is easier than clicking.

I have a few things open at all times. One of those things is technically two of those things. I have two terminals open at all times. One is used to SSH into other stuff, but it's open and gets used.

Working in the terminal shouldn't be seen as a chore. It should be seen as a benefit.
 

CrazedNerd

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I have a few things open at all times. One of those things is technically two of those things. I have two terminals open at all times. One is used to SSH into other stuff, but it's open and gets used.

Working in the terminal shouldn't be seen as a chore. It should be seen as a benefit.
I think op basically just wants to avoid those complex commands with multiple arguments and stuff, a normal would probably be fine with "sudo apt install" and "sudo apt remove --auto-remove", I'm a pretty rare person who enjoys the command line: never met anyone in real life who likes to do that.
 

Sappho

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My opinion (not an endorsement) is that derivatives of Debian, or Ubuntu (a derivative of Debian itself), are probably the safest bet, especially if you are new to Linux.

Personally, the very first Linux distribution that I have ever used was Ubuntu.

Thus the two distributions that come to my mind as best fulfilling the criteria of graphical-based tools, while also having the advantage of having a plethora of helpful online resources that you can peruse are Linux Mint, and Ubuntu.

As well as Ubuntu's spins (think remixes or flavors) such as Lubuntu or Xubuntu, though Kubuntu would not be my first recommendation to you due to the free reins it gives you over customization of your user experience, the sheer amount of options and configuration might be overwhelming for a beginner.
 

Bartman

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I say just download one and create bootable media and run it as a Live version to get a feel / taste of Linux and go from there.
 

darry1966

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With so much info on the internet - using the command line is a lot easier. Especially you tube.
 

wizardfromoz

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Brickwizard

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I will assume the OP is still using his old kit with the Pentium-5400
although this will run most distributions, it is from 2009, many of the newer distributions are getting a bit Heavey, so I will suggest a medium weight [or lightweight] build will be more suitable
Peppermint
MX-64
Linux Lite
and possibly Mint LMDE
these are my suggestions, but as always I must point out your choice of Linux distribution , is just that, YOUR choice, and must be based on what works best on your kit, which one you feel most comfortable with and the one that you like the look of.
as always I will suggest you get a USB pen-drive, of good quality and not less than 4gb [but not too big] download a selection of distributions, and test them out "LIVE"
 

Bartman

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OPs computer specs post #1 from this thread.
I've got a desktop computer which is a: Dual core, CPUE5400 @ 2.7 GHZ with 4 GB of ram.

Here's one of my computer's (similar specs) I run Linux on.
Code:
[email protected]:~$ inxi -Fxz
System:    Kernel: 5.10.0-17-amd64 x86_64 bits: 64 compiler: gcc v: 10.2.1 Desktop: LXQt 0.16.1
           Distro: SparkyLinux 6.4 (Po-Tolo) base: Debian bullseye/sid
Machine:   Type: Desktop System: Dell product: OptiPlex 380 v: N/A serial: <filter>
           Mobo: Dell model: 0HN7XN v: A01 serial: <filter> BIOS: Dell v: A02 date: 08/27/2010
CPU:       Info: Dual Core model: Intel Core2 Duo E7500 bits: 64 type: MCP arch: Penryn rev: A
           L2 cache: 3 MiB
           flags: lm nx pae sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 ssse3 vmx bogomips: 11704
           Speed: 1596 MHz min/max: 1600/2933 MHz Core speeds (MHz): 1: 1596 2: 1596
Graphics:  Device-1: Intel 4 Series Integrated Graphics vendor: Dell driver: i915 v: kernel
           bus ID: 00:02.0
           Display: x11 server: X.Org 1.20.11 driver: loaded: modesetting unloaded: fbdev,vesa
           resolution: 1024x768~75Hz
           OpenGL: renderer: Mesa DRI Intel G41 (ELK) v: 2.1 Mesa 20.3.5 direct render: Yes
Audio:     Device-1: Intel NM10/ICH7 Family High Definition Audio vendor: Dell
           driver: snd_hda_intel v: kernel bus ID: 00:1b.0
           Sound Server: ALSA v: k5.10.0-17-amd64
Network:   Device-1: Broadcom NetLink BCM57780 Gigabit Ethernet PCIe vendor: Dell driver: tg3
           v: kernel port: ece0 bus ID: 02:00.0
           IF: eth0 state: up speed: 1000 Mbps duplex: full mac: <filter>                          
Drives:    Local Storage: total: 37.25 GiB used: 6.06 GiB (16.3%)                                  
           ID-1: /dev/sda vendor: Western Digital model: WD400BD-75JMA0 size: 37.25 GiB            
Partition: ID-1: / size: 36.37 GiB used: 6.06 GiB (16.7%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda1                  
Swap:      ID-1: swap-1 type: file size: 512 MiB used: 0 KiB (0.0%) file: /swapfile                
Sensors:   System Temperatures: cpu: 35.0 C mobo: N/A                                              
           Fan Speeds (RPM): N/A                                                                   
Info:      Processes: 145 Uptime: 16h 36m Memory: 3.74 GiB used: 1.34 GiB (35.8%) Init: systemd    
           runlevel: 5 Compilers: gcc: 10.2.1 Packages: 1798 Shell: Bash v: 5.1.4 inxi: 3.3.01     
[email protected]:~$
 
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