Getting started with Linux Arch



Ravel12

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Haven't been brave enough to try Arch the Arch way.
Try it in a vm first. It's easier to trial and error on a vm.
Just be wary of the installation guide.
E.g. There was no mention of pacman -S dhcpcd (buried deep inside the network pages) which will cause your installation have no ip address upon bootup. Without it, you either have to go static IP or not be able to pacman -S any more packages. I do switch the using networkmanager once I am able to get an ip address.
special attention also needs to paid to grub and efibootmgr packages (if you are using uefi), which is again, 1 or 2 pages deep under bootloaders.
 
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Ravel12

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Check out Archman https://sourceforge.net/projects/archman-os/

It has a Calamares installer so you get the whole thing. I started from xfce and have been slowly removing stuff...
https://endeavouros.com/ is similar too. Was really simple to use. It's basically helps you to preselect bootloaders, network managers and give you a desktop environment that's clean.

but ... I prefer to try the arch way. The plethora of choices when installing arch is just bewildering. from bootloaders to choice of network manager and desktop environments, you can pick and choose whichever you like.
 
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HaxNet

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Arch is really isn't that hard. I think I've done it 15 times. I always tend to forget a step which is very annoying. Yes I kinda don't take notes lol. But after a while of doing it over and over again. I just decided to get an installer such as ArchLabs. It's the closest thing to doing it the Vanilla way. However, there was problem with the latest release which I ended up doing a lot of manual stuff as well. So ehh.
 

f33dm3bits

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If you want to learn how Linux works and are willing to put in the time Arch is a great disto for that. Don't follow any alternative installation guides. Just use the official Installation Guide, you will also find links and references to other things you might want to use in your installation. If you don't understand something just search the Arch wiki and you will mostly like find the documentation for what you are looking for.
 
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f33dm3bits

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didn't know this exist. As aur is compiled. I'm just wondering if yay and buildaur cleanly remove the package if we decide to. Or is that more dependent on the aur build scripts?
I use aurutils because it allows you to use pacman to install aur packages instead of needing to use a pacman wrapper. You search and build with aurutils and then you install the package using pacman, man aur to read the documentation.
 


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