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Bartier_Barbie

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Hi, I'm Brazilian and it's the second time I've decided to use Linux. In fact, my husband had a Chinese netbook with the Fedora 8 installed, was great to discover alone how to upgrade to a recent version, and wasn't easy, because few people choose the Fedora. Now I have a new notebook Samsung and I've installed Ubuntu, after a incident trying to install Mint (I've deleted the windows 10 and discovered that I haven't installed the Mint, shit happens). I'm wanting to be a programmer, or, at least, try. Some tips to start? I'm thinking about doing some courses, still don't know. I don't wanna waist my time at a college. Well, I think I've written a lot. Thanks for any help!
 


wizardfromoz

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Best is if you start a separate Thread in Getting Started and ask about learning resources there, and leave this one for general "hello's" and "welcomes".

G'day Barbie and welcome again.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 

kc1di

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Welcome to the Forums, enjoy! :)
 
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Bartier_Barbie

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Best is if you start a separate Thread in Getting Started and ask about learning resources there, and leave this one for general "hello's" and "welcomes".

G'day Barbie and welcome again.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
Thanks for this tip! I'm sorry for any inconvenience. Always learning!
 

Brickwizard

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Welcome to the forums, hope you hang on in this time. enjoy
 
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Hello Bartier Barbie Welcome to Linux.org forums.

Hang in there and enjoy the Linux adventure.

Don't become frustrated when things go astray.

Read up and install Timeshift and when things do go astray and become un-repairable then you can restore your Linux.



This is useful.
 
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Nik-Ken-Bah

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@Bartier_Barbie G'day and welcome to the forum.
Enjoy your journey as you learn to be a programmer. A few course would not be a bad idea nor a waste of finances as it consolidates what you learn by yourself as well as learning wrinkles of the whys and ways of programming from fellow students and your instructors.
 
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Bartier_Barbie

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@Bartier_Barbie G'day and welcome to the forum.
Enjoy your journey as you learn to be a programmer. A few course would not be a bad idea nor a waste of finances as it consolidates what you learn by yourself as well as learning wrinkles of the whys and ways of programming from fellow students and your instructors.
Thanks! Yeah, I think the same, there's a lot of things that a college don't offer, and I have to work my math, too. This math course is cheap and I'll need it.
 

Matt.m

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Thanks! Yeah, I think the same, there's a lot of things that a college don't offer, and I have to work my math, too. This math course is cheap and I'll need it.
I don't know what your current math level is, but if you want to become a programmer, you need to work on linear algebra and calculus and the rest is required proportionate to your programming field.
 

gvisoc

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I don’t agree. I’d rather say you need pen and paper.

You need maths if you want to solve maths problems by programming. You can code entire apps and even operating systems without having to code any algebraic concept.

In general, what you need to program is to be used to express a solution in simple and small steps that can be expressed with a programming language.

At the beginning, a pencil and a scratchpad to synthesise those steps will make the whole process much easier and rewarding.
 

Matt.m

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I don’t agree. I’d rather say you need pen and paper.

You need maths if you want to solve maths problem by programming. You can code entire apps and even operating systems without having to code any algebraic concept.

In general, what you need to program is to be used to express a solution in simple and small steps that can be expressed with a programming language.

At the beginning, a pencil and a scratchpad to synthesise those steps will make the whole process much easier and rewarding.
Yes, that is true. I said that considering his passionate for learning math. Of course programming is possible without knowing much about math. There are many teenagers that they only have a very basic math knowledge but they can program. One thing i always believe is very useful to start any programming language is having and learning algorithmic thinking. Of course its only my opinion :)
 

gvisoc

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Yes, algorithmic thinking is key, but that’s not calculus or algebra, but rather a more basic problem solving technique that is also used at maths. It’s kind of a requisite for both.

For example, ordering a list efficiently takes algorithmic thinking, but not maths. Solving a square root with pen and paper is maths, and requires also algorithmic thinking (as we implement an algorithm, with pen and paper, for that).
 
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Bartier_Barbie

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I don’t agree. I’d rather say you need pen and paper.

You need maths if you want to solve maths problems by programming. You can code entire apps and even operating systems without having to code any algebraic concept.

In general, what you need to program is to be used to express a solution in simple and small steps that can be expressed with a programming language.

At the beginning, a pencil and a scratchpad to synthesise those steps will make the whole process much easier and rewarding.
Ah! I'm happy to know it! Thanks!
 

Brickwizard

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Algebra may not be considered necessary per-say, but what it does do is teach the brain logical thinking, playing logic and mind games can do the same
 

KGIII

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For example, ordering a list efficiently takes algorithmic thinking, but not maths.

As a mathematician (and crappy programmer), I'd argue with this.

It doesn't take *arithmetic*, but it does take math. See, most of you will only know math as arithmetic but it's really a language and a philosophy. The language of mathematics is used to evaluate statements for logic - even in arithmetic.

Mathematics is so much more than just arithmetic and it's a darned shame how it's taught in schools today. They still teach it largely by rote without once ever mentioning the whole logic thing They don't even touch on the fact that it's a language.

1 + 1 = 2. We can evaluate that for logic and conclude that it's correct. (Well, mostly... Our friend Bertrand Russell might argue that it's just an arbitrary answer, having spent nearly 200 pages devoted to the subject.)

Algorithmic thinking is indeed mathematical thinking. In fact, we even have (in advanced math) symbology for it. You might recognize some, such as Boolean operands.

Just because you're not expressing it numerically doesn't mean it's not math. The following is math:

cats are to dogs as goldfish are to guppies (which can even be expressed with symbols like : and ||)

Just because there's no numbers involved, doesn't mean it's not math. It's a statement you can evaluate for logic. I encourage folks to skim the following two links:


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mathematical_symbols_by_subject#Logic (see also group theory)

No, I'm not one of those weirdos that thinks math is everywhere and everything. The universe isn't math. Mathematics is just the language we use to make statements about the universe and then to evaluate those statements for logic (sometimes interpreted as truth). So, math isn't everything and everywhere - we can just use it to describe most everything and everywhere.
 

VP9KS

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Hi, I'm Brazilian and it's the second time I've decided to use Linux. In fact, my husband had a Chinese netbook with the Fedora 8 installed, was great to discover alone how to upgrade to a recent version, and wasn't easy, because few people choose the Fedora. Now I have a new notebook Samsung and I've installed Ubuntu, after a incident trying to install Mint (I've deleted the windows 10 and discovered that I haven't installed the Mint, shit happens). I'm wanting to be a programmer, or, at least, try. Some tips to start? I'm thinking about doing some courses, still don't know. I don't wanna waist my time at a college. Well, I think I've written a lot. Thanks for any help!
Welcome to the group! As far as wasting time at a college, have you tried looking at the M.I.T Open Courseware? You can view videos of all the lectures at the Mas. Inst. of Tech., you know, the one up there in 'Bean Town". Check it out online https://ocw.mit.edu/index.htm

Happy Trails,
Paul
 

VP9KS

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Algebra may not be considered necessary per-say, but what it does do is teach the brain logical thinking, playing logic and mind games can do the same
Logic puzzles are also helpful. They work the "little grey cells", don't ya know!
 
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