Guidance on new Linux PC build please

L

Lufo

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I built plenty of ATX sized computes years ago and took a long break after my Win 7 Gigabyte build. So much has changed in technology and I am behind the times for certain. I need guidance please on a Linux computer build that uses an Intel i7 gen 12 CPU, SFF board/case, power supply, SSD (256), memory(16g), etc. I have no idea who the reputable MB manufacturers are now or cases.

The PC will be for non-gaming, home use. Basic internet, some light graphic and art editing. I tend to over build for future proof. I am now learning the difference between Micro-ATX and Mini-ITX. Looks like either will work but I don't really want to go fanless.





Many thanks,

Lufo
 
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Alexzee

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Depending on your budget you could go with Asus, Gigabyte AS Rock or MSI.
The last 2 pc builds that I did I have had good performance with Asus and MSI and my Linux operatings systems run great!

With Asus I had to go into the BIOS and delete the keys and disable the secure boot in order to install Linux.


Fractal Design makes really nice pc cases however; there are many different cases to choose from. It depends on your budget and what size mobo you plan to purchase. You'll need a case that has good air flow.

 

Bartman

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forester

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Personal preferences only

mobo Gigabyte
SSD Patriot or Samsung
RAM Crucial, Kingston, other major brands -- low latency
WiFi mobo has switch or jumper to able/disable internal card (also, to reset CMOS)
Graphics recommend to stick with Intel unless nVidia desired

Don't build them anymore but put together a few 2000 - 2010 and back when a most distros would fit on a 700MB CD.
 

CrazedNerd

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Linux will pretty much work with everything...I like the Asus Rog Strix boards, I've heard good things about asrock. I prefer to always use SSDs, whether it's a normal 2.5" or M.2. If you want to do graphical stuff without a card, the amd 5600g is good but it looks like you want to go Intel. Mini-itx has low profile processor fans by noctua.
 

Tolkem

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I need guidance please on a Linux computer build
I've been able to run Linux on 5 different computers, between a couple of laptops and 3 desktops, and all of them different in everything; mobo, ran, storage, etc. So, I think in depends on your budget and personal preferences. I like to go here: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/ and see what's out there.
1659380624217.png

You get to select different pieces from different brands, save to a file or several ones with different configurations/builds. You get prices, compatibility issues, estimated wattage, and pretty much a good deal of info that might be helpful for future reference in your search, or even buy the pieces right away by clicking on the ... buy, button. :)
 

Bartman

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Linux will pretty much work with everything...
With the exception of certain Nvidia graphics cards.
Certain Nvidia graphics cards are problematic with Linux.



 
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OP
L

Lufo

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Wow! Big thanks to everyone! I am reading all that is posted and even more. So far I have been down that rabbit hole of too much knowledge. :) I looked at boards from the 'cpu on board' offerings to eATX. The AMD cpu (which I know little of) and the Intel from i5 to i7 (12 gen). I actually like the cpu on board option but the Asrock's I looked at were limited to 8 gig of memory.

I also like the MDTX boards and their size but they are limited to AMD, not really a problem but I am not as familiar with AMD. Years ago in the early days of AMD I had a lot of problems with their cpu and that sticks in my memory. Today though, I expect those compatibility issues are ironed out.

Chipsets at present have me boggled as well as cooling and case space. At present, the latest Intel chipset seems problematic with Linux but that will eventually be resolved. None the less, I think I will stay with an earlier chipset and if a Intel CPU then one that is locked and working at 65 watts. Again, I am likely gathering tooooo much knowledge but at some point I will toss in the towel and make an all or nothing build.

Money is not so much an issue but at the same time I do not need the 2k gaming system either. As I read the tidbits you have posted for me I am slowing whittling my 'wants' down to 'needs'. With that, I know I want a case with a DVD drive at the front as I really do not want to put a USB/DVD on the desktop. I know I do not need the lastest 12 gen CPU from Intel or the latest AMD processor (AM4), nor is the latest chipset a real bonus. I have been using PCPartPicker to get an idea of what will work so...between that and the good advice here I will eventually come to a reasonable solution. :)

Thanks,

Lou
 

Condobloke

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Good luck with your journey, @Lufo .

Can you give a list of your choices when you arrive at a final decision?
 
OP
L

Lufo

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I have read where some boards were requiring a bios change or a step back in order to install Linux. I have in the past built a lot of Windows PC with Gigabyte, MSI and Intel (when Intel made their own boards for public consumption) but, this time around so far, I am drawn to the ASROCK and ASUS lines. Something about the ASROCK I am liking better...not sure what it is, maybe just looks.
 
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L

Lufo

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Whoops...forgot to add; for certain I will post what I finally came up with for components. Probably nothing earth shattering but at least it will be an option for others to try. Presently wrapping my noodle around cooler space clearance and cases.
 

CrazedNerd

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Whoops...forgot to add; for certain I will post what I finally came up with for components. Probably nothing earth shattering but at least it will be an option for others to try. Presently wrapping my noodle around cooler space clearance and cases.
I'm more curious about the success of the install.
 
OP
L

Lufo

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I have returned from the darkness of the internet and have an Intel CPU question. The below image shows first the Intel i7-12700 and the second column is the i7-12700K. Only significant difference twix the two are speeds and thermal. The K model will over clock and runs a higher thermal and wattage profile. I really do not intend to overclock but am concerned about the difference in shown speeds. Thus the question, and I will use Ubuntu as a reference distro...Will Linux want to operate at the faster speeds inherently or will it gravitate to the lower CPU speed?

I prefer the i7-12700 model with the lower thermal and power profile but I do not want to be relegated to a significantly lower cpu speed because of that.

The board I have settled on ( so far ) is the ASROCK H670M Pro RS in the mini ATX size. The H670 chipset seems to be a good, reasonable balance and fills my needs.

As always...thanks for the assistance. I am old but still trainable. :)
 

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KGIII

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Thus the question, and I will use Ubuntu as a reference distro...Will Linux want to operate at the faster speeds inherently or will it gravitate to the lower CPU speed?

By default, Ubuntu will utilize CPU scaling, using a lower rate when at idle and scaling to a higher level as load increases. You can override this and make it static, say at the highest level or the lowest level. It's best to just let it use scaling.
 
OP
L

Lufo

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By default, Ubuntu will utilize CPU scaling, using a lower rate when at idle and scaling to a higher level as load increases. You can override this and make it static, say at the highest level or the lowest level. It's best to just let it use scaling.

Thank you, that is exactly what I needed to know. I will go with the i7-12700 which is easier on power. There is a 12700T with half the power usage of the 12700 but....it also comes in somewhat lower on cpu horsepower. I can live with the any of them really but I will go mid-range and use the 12th gen i7-12700 cpu.

Now...off on a quest for memory boards and case/power supply. Kingston, Crucial, Corsair, and G-Skill memory are on the list. I am thinking along the lines of 16 gig being sufficient.

I appreciate the advice. :)
 

Alexzee

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Thank you, that is exactly what I needed to know. I will go with the i7-12700 which is easier on power. There is a 12700T with half the power usage of the 12700 but....it also comes in somewhat lower on cpu horsepower. I can live with the any of them really but I will go mid-range and use the 12th gen i7-12700 cpu.

Now...off on a quest for memory boards and case/power supply. Kingston, Crucial, Corsair, and G-Skill memory are on the list. I am thinking along the lines of 16 gig being sufficient.

I appreciate the advice. :)
I can speak for Crucial and G-Skill works and runs great.
As far as a power supply I've always stuck with Corsair and never had a problem.
 

KGIII

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I am thinking along the lines of 16 gig being sufficient.

If you're anything like me, 16 really won't be adequate. Consider 32 GB of RAM for a modern system with a few browsers open and maybe 150ish tabs open at once along with all the other things you need, like terminals, email client, text editor, file manager, VM manager, a VM or two, etc...
 

Condobloke

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32 GB of ram would be in order

You have performance 'parts'....it may as well Perform !
 
OP
L

Lufo

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Howdy all...

Well, I have returned from the madness of hardware comparisons and here is what I have come up with.

Noctua NH-L9i-17xx Low Profile cooler @44.95
Silverstone 300w TFX-300 PSU @ 68.99
Silverstone Milo-11 mATX case @ 69.66
G-Skill Flare X series Memory F4-3200C14D-16GFX (2x8g) @99.99
Samsung 970 EVO SSD 500g (m.2) MZ-V7E500BW @89.00
ASRock H670M PRO RX mATX motherboard @119.99
Intel i7-12700 CPU @342.98

All components are from Amazon and total price is $836.55 USD. There are a host of i3 and i5 CPU that are compatible with this board and using one of those might save as much as $50 to $100 USD. But, I am sticking with the i7-12700.

I still need to consider a DVD/RW drive, likely internal but external is acceptable. If someone has experience on that please offer up a brand suggestion please. If internal then needs to be SATA and if external then USB.

The above components were based on home use need for internet, some use of GIMP, Youtube, music, etc., no gaming at all. The onboard Intel UHD 770 graphics should be fine for all I need. If I find I need greater graphics power then I will put in a non-Nvidia board. Same with memory; this board has four slots and if I use two 8g for 16g total memory then I take advantage of dual memory. If more memory is needed then I will add two more 8g matched sticks.

Keyboard and mouse are next...and that brings up a question of how does the booting bios see a wireless keyboard and mouse? At present I expect I will be booting Ubuntu from a USB stick that contains the installable image. If I have a DVD installed then likely Ubuntu will be installed from a DVD.

The adventure continues! :)

Lufo
 
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