How do I extend my Linux partition size?

hDac2k

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So I'm dual booting Mint and Windows 10, and initially I gave my Linux partition 100GB of space, but now I kind of used it all and I started searching online to see if I could just extend it by shrinking my Windows partition and just adding the extra space, but apparently that breaks everything.
So I started looking online and nothing worked from what I tried, and I am not in the mood to ruin my PC by messing some partition stuff, so anyone has any videos tutorial or something to extend it?
 


stan

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I gave my Linux partition 100GB of space, but now I kind of used it all
Linux Mint probably only takes up 7 or 8 GB, so there is a ton of stuff that you can delete or uninstall to clean up your system. That would be the safest thing to do.


I am not in the mood to ruin my PC by messing some partition stuff
Your thread asks how to extend your partition. And you're right... you can mess up your system messing with partition stuff. Any time you start making partition changes, you should backup any files (both Windows and Linux) that you can't live without if something goes wrong. Not doing so is a very hard lesson to learn... and many of us have done it.

If you have Gparted on Mint, run it and make a screenshot to show us exactly what your hard drive layout is like. If you don't have Gparted, install it with sudo apt install gparted. If your Windows partition is adjacent to your Linux partition, you should be able to shrink Windows and expand Linux, as you said. If you decide to take this step, a full defrag of Windows is good to do before you shrink Windows.


anyone has any videos tutorial or something to extend it?
You can Google as well as we can. Include Gparted in your search questions.
 

hDac2k

New Member
Credits
32
Linux Mint probably only takes up 7 or 8 GB, so there is a ton of stuff that you can delete or uninstall to clean up your system. That would be the safest thing to do.



Your thread asks how to extend your partition. And you're right... you can mess up your system messing with partition stuff. Any time you start making partition changes, you should backup any files (both Windows and Linux) that you can't live without if something goes wrong. Not doing so is a very hard lesson to learn... and many of us have done it.

If you have Gparted on Mint, run it and make a screenshot to show us exactly what your hard drive layout is like. If you don't have Gparted, install it with sudo apt install gparted. If your Windows partition is adjacent to your Linux partition, you should be able to shrink Windows and expand Linux, as you said. If you decide to take this step, a full defrag of Windows is good to do before you shrink Windows.



You can Google as well as we can. Include Gparted in your search questions.
So I kinda wrote a thing wrong, but the question remains. My home as 100GB and it is only half full, the File System is the one full.

These are my partitions. No idea what half of them do, but they are there.
1616085613335.png
 

stan

Well-Known Member
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7,057
Before resizing, you could boot into Linux Mint and try the command sudo apt autoremove. This will remove excess kernels from past updates, and maybe some other things. It may give you enough free space to help, but you may still want more.

You're in pretty good shape to resize and claim that 48 GB of unallocated space for your Linux. I will repeat: you should backup anything important that you can't afford to live without. We don't want you to lose data, but this responsibility is on you.

Before you go to the video below... for your safety, you should boot your computer on a Linux Mint (or other) "live USB" and run Gparted from there. I think that Gparted will refuse to resize the partition that it is running on (/dev/nvme0n1p5), so I think this is a required step, or at least a sensible step.

Here is a video that will help show you the steps, but it is way more than you need. You can start watching about the 5:30 mark... but that is going over changing and moving the Extended and SWAP partitions. This does not apply to you, but it is a good introduction to what you are about to do. At about the 8:00 minute mark, it shows exactly how to use Gparted to resize your /dev/nvme0n1p5 partition and claim any or all of the unallocated space. The video is pretty clear, and by the 10:00 minute mark he is finished and rebooting out of the live media and back into the regular operating system (he is using Ubuntu in a virtual machine, but these steps should work for you).

Good luck!
 

hDac2k

New Member
Credits
32
Before resizing, you could boot into Linux Mint and try the command sudo apt autoremove. This will remove excess kernels from past updates, and maybe some other things. It may give you enough free space to help, but you may still want more.

You're in pretty good shape to resize and claim that 48 GB of unallocated space for your Linux. I will repeat: you should backup anything important that you can't afford to live without. We don't want you to lose data, but this responsibility is on you.

Before you go to the video below... for your safety, you should boot your computer on a Linux Mint (or other) "live USB" and run Gparted from there. I think that Gparted will refuse to resize the partition that it is running on (/dev/nvme0n1p5), so I think this is a required step, or at least a sensible step.

Here is a video that will help show you the steps, but it is way more than you need. You can start watching about the 5:30 mark... but that is going over changing and moving the Extended and SWAP partitions. This does not apply to you, but it is a good introduction to what you are about to do. At about the 8:00 minute mark, it shows exactly how to use Gparted to resize your /dev/nvme0n1p5 partition and claim any or all of the unallocated space. The video is pretty clear, and by the 10:00 minute mark he is finished and rebooting out of the live media and back into the regular operating system (he is using Ubuntu in a virtual machine, but these steps should work for you).

Good luck!
Thanks for the help.
I'll let you know if I managed to not make my laptop unusable.
 

hDac2k

New Member
Credits
32
Before resizing, you could boot into Linux Mint and try the command sudo apt autoremove. This will remove excess kernels from past updates, and maybe some other things. It may give you enough free space to help, but you may still want more.

You're in pretty good shape to resize and claim that 48 GB of unallocated space for your Linux. I will repeat: you should backup anything important that you can't afford to live without. We don't want you to lose data, but this responsibility is on you.

Before you go to the video below... for your safety, you should boot your computer on a Linux Mint (or other) "live USB" and run Gparted from there. I think that Gparted will refuse to resize the partition that it is running on (/dev/nvme0n1p5), so I think this is a required step, or at least a sensible step.

Here is a video that will help show you the steps, but it is way more than you need. You can start watching about the 5:30 mark... but that is going over changing and moving the Extended and SWAP partitions. This does not apply to you, but it is a good introduction to what you are about to do. At about the 8:00 minute mark, it shows exactly how to use Gparted to resize your /dev/nvme0n1p5 partition and claim any or all of the unallocated space. The video is pretty clear, and by the 10:00 minute mark he is finished and rebooting out of the live media and back into the regular operating system (he is using Ubuntu in a virtual machine, but these steps should work for you).

Good luck!
So I did not screw it up. Thanks.
 

bikrgran

New Member
Credits
33
Linux Mint probably only takes up 7 or 8 GB, so there is a ton of stuff that you can delete or uninstall to clean up your system. That would be the safest thing to do.



Your thread asks how to extend your partition. And you're right... you can mess up your system messing with partition stuff. Any time you start making partition changes, you should backup any files (both Windows and Linux) that you can't live without if something goes wrong. Not doing so is a very hard lesson to learn... and many of us have done it.

If you have Gparted on Mint, run it and make a screenshot to show us exactly what your hard drive layout is like. If you don't have Gparted, install it with sudo apt install gparted. If your Windows partition is adjacent to your Linux partition, you should be able to shrink Windows and expand Linux, as you said. If you decide to take this step, a full defrag of Windows is good to do before you shrink Windows.



You can Google as well as we can. Include Gparted in your search questions.
I'm going through the same thing. I tried to upgrade to 20.1 by installing it over 19.3, per It'sFOSS. Somehow I screwed up, so at this point, on the desktop, I've done a total restore, after losing my Boot/Grub thing. I've got that done, but now, when I try to install Mint 20.1 in dual boot, it wants a boot sector, and I'm trying to put it in a 1MB sector, and it doesn't like that. On the laptop, I shrank Windows, and ended up with an unused sector, which I can't seem to get added to the Linux sector. I'm really watching this to see what I'm missing. Please continue. ;-)
 

stan

Well-Known Member
Credits
7,057
Please continue. ;-)
Well, this thread is wrapped up, I think. :)

But it's generally better to present your particular problem in a new thread (Mint, or General Linux) and give as many details about your problem and your system as you can. A screenshot from Gparted, like that shown above, might be very helpful, as well as outputs from commands like fdisk -l and lsblk.

Fdisk needs to be run as root, and to clarify, those are FDISK -L and LSBLK, except all lower case.
 
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