How long do you guys think it would take to become proficient in Linux, get Linux certs?

JohnGalt

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I am currently in my 20's, in the military and get out in a couple of years, I have more free time in my job than most others and it's actually not that bad but I do not want to stay in because of the inefficiency and bullshit in it. I went to school for networking for a year and then CAD for 2 but HATED it, school is just horrible to me. The shitty computers, the professors that don't particularly care, grades and being forced to think a certain way and learn at the same pace, all of it just kind of sucked so I don't plan on going back but getting some IT certs seems like it is a good route to go.

I am starting out with Linux then will learn Python, then probably networking to then get into ethical hacking. I feel like starting with Linux will set me up pretty well vs starting out with Python. My main problem is figuring out what to focus on when learning all about Linux, there is so much information and it is already hard to study because I have ADHD. I have a couple of Udemy courses, IT ProTV and YouTube has a lot of stuff but I am bouncing around a lot.

Do you guys have any courses or books you would recommend?

How long do you think it would take to get the Linux + and RedHat Linux cert?

For two years during my free time, what are some realistic goal posts?
 


Alexzee

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The book that comes to mind is the Red Hat Study Guide that has Exams and Questions in it.

BTW, the last time I checked on the Red Hat Linux Exams they start at about $700.00.

Each person is different when it comes to learning so I can't say how long it would take you to run CentOS (free version of RH) and how long it would take you to study the RHCSA book.

For 2 years with free time you could start doing a few things.
1. Download CentOS and start using it every day and get to know the operating system.

2. Read the documentation for the package management system that comes with Centos and get to know how it works well. Install and remove packages for practice as you'll have to perform those kinds of things during your exam.

3. Read up on how to set up a server with CentoOS and any other documentation in general that you can find for setting up a server with Linux. Learn how to configure maria data base.

4. Attend a Linux conference, seminar or go online with The Linux Foundation and have a look there.




Good luck-:)
 

Palzaj

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The best way would be to stay in military as IT specialist. Linux knowledge you can get in some years, it is not so difficult.
 

GsQs

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ITProTV is fantastic. If you work your way through their basic short Linux courses and then into their CompTIA Linux+, you'll become pretty proficient with Linux pretty quick. All the better if you take advantage of their virtual labs and other goodies.
 

f33dm3bits

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Anyone can pass an exam, it's not so hard just takes study time. What takes time is getting experience on the job which is where you learn the most.
 

JohnGalt

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The best way would be to stay in military as IT specialist. Linux knowledge you can get in some years, it is not so difficult.
Yeah but the military isn't for me. I can't stand the groupthink mentality, do as you're told, obey orders, question nothing. The money is not bad but the people that you have to work with... The lack of freedom, choosing where you want to go etc. and then the IT field in the military is ancient unless you snag a job at the Pentagon.

Then you would have to re-rate, go back to technical school, all for what? To be around the same assholes and bullshit just in a new job, then get stuck somewhere shitty. It is not bad for someone young to start out but making a career out of the military, haha no thanks.

Edit: I probably should have mentioned that I am not in IT in the military, I clean guns and work on helicopters, the furthest thing from IT.
 

jglen490

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That's a whole different thing.

So, I get that you don't want to go back to school, and that MAYBE a path that leads to a degree may not be ideal for you. You will still need to focus yourself on something, whether its a certification path or some basic studies on systems administration.

So how do you get there? If you don't want to pursue a different career path in the military, then you need to decide what your career path will be on the outside and on your own. If you can define a goal, very specific, very focused, and very obtainable - and then build on that, you will be successful.

Quite frankly whether in the military or out, griping, moaning, and groaning gets you nowhere. I spent over 20 years in the US Air Force as an enlisted guy. There were all kinds of people with all kinds of ideas of how to get ahead. The ones who climb on your head to get ahead are not the only ones. There are plenty who reach back and offer a hand up - look for them. Those same kind of people exist outside the military, too. Look for them, and stop moping in your own pity party.

Focus on what will make you better, not what you are stuck in.
 

Alexzee

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To get something you never had you have to do something you never did:-
 

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