I can't install Linux?

DontBeADouce

New Member
I want to install Linux, side by side with Windows (my primary OS) but when booting I keep getting this error (DVD & USB-boot) [Checking media]... Fail - 2-3 times, I think.

What is wrong? Am I downloading the wrong version or what is it?

If you need more info - ask me. Kindly ofc.
 


wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Hi DontBeADouce ... I may not be your main helper here, as I do not use Windows, but a couple of questions spring to mind that may help you, and others to follow:

  1. Did you actually burn a Linux .iso to your removable media, or just copy?
  2. What is the actual Linux you wish to install, down to the .iso name eg debian-live-8.6.0-amd64-cinnamon-desktop.iso ... is Debian 8.6 with the Cinnamon DE (Desktop Environment) ... you may be looking at eg Linux 18.1 MATE, or Ubuntu 16.04 Unity, you get the picture.
There are more questions I could ask, but we can take it from there. A few of the specs from your computer would be helpful too.

Cheers

Wizard
 

DontBeADouce

New Member
Hi DontBeADouce ... I may not be your main helper here, as I do not use Windows, but a couple of questions spring to mind that may help you, and others to follow:

  1. Did you actually burn a Linux .iso to your removable media, or just copy?
  2. What is the actual Linux you wish to install, down to the .iso name eg debian-live-8.6.0-amd64-cinnamon-desktop.iso ... is Debian 8.6 with the Cinnamon DE (Desktop Environment) ... you may be looking at eg Linux 18.1 MATE, or Ubuntu 16.04 Unity, you get the picture.
There are more questions I could ask, but we can take it from there. A few of the specs from your computer would be helpful too.

Cheers

Wizard
Thank you for your kind answer!

Well... I downloaded it first, unpacked and moved it over.
Then I tried to not unpack, and just throw it over.
Of what I can read, it sounds like I'm totally out of road.
Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I'm new to Linux, and I think - it would be a great introduction to the world of Linux.
I don't think about, if it's MATE, Cinnamon or what they are called else.

A few specs:
Intel Pentium Processor and 8GB of RAM - if there's other specs, you would like to know - just ask.

The Best Regards!
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Well... I downloaded it first, unpacked and moved it over.
Then I tried to not unpack, and just throw it over.
As I suspected, that is your first hurdle to overcome. Linux is not like Windows where you can doubleclick a .exe, .msi or .cab and have it self-extract and install. With Linux, you have to burn the iso to USB or CD/DVD, which then makes the medium bootable to install or test drive. You then have to either change your startup order to boot usb or dvd ahead of hard drive, or temporarily change it using your function keys, eg F12 or F2 depending on computer, in order to get it to initialise and bring you to the install option.

The 8GB of RAM is heaps for any Linux, the Pentium CPU may limit a few options but still leave you heaps of choices. Architecture eg 32-bit or 64-bit (do you know which one applies to your Win 10?) will determine what iso to download and install.

Once we get these preliminaries out of the way, we can move along more smoothly. If you have not made the acquaintance of Pirifom Speccy in Windows, it is free to download from https://www.piriform.com/speccy
... you could run it and provide us a with a link to the report it generates (no privacy issues involved), then we will know what we are dealing with.

Then in Windows, you can use Rufus or Yumi, or a Windows facility, to burn the iso to your removable medium.

I will be in and out during my Saturday morning here in Oz, but if someone else picks up the ball and runs with it, they will likely have good advice.

Wizard

BTW just noted Rob has entered the building, you are in safe hands, lol.
Edited - added BTW
 

DontBeADouce

New Member
We can even back it up a bit.. what are you looking to use Linux for? Just testing the waters for a desktop alternative, I'd suggest we walk you through doing either a USB install, or USB live image at first with Linux mint or Ubuntu.

What's the filename (blah.iso) that you're working with?

Rob
No, my I see Linux as my future operating system.
Anyways, the iso's was called amd64.iso
Is there speciel settings, I should set in BIOS?

As I suspected, that is your first hurdle to overcome. Linux is not like Windows where you can doubleclick a .exe, .msi or .cab and have it self-extract and install. With Linux, you have to burn the iso to USB or CD/DVD, which then makes the medium bootable to install or test drive. You then have to either change your startup order to boot usb or dvd ahead of hard drive, or temporarily change it using your function keys, eg F12 or F2 depending on computer, in order to get it to initialise and bring you to the install option.

The 8GB of RAM is heaps for any Linux, the Pentium CPU may limit a few options but still leave you heaps of choices. Architecture eg 32-bit or 64-bit (do you know which one applies to your Win 10?) will determine what iso to download and install.

Once we get these preliminaries out of the way, we can move along more smoothly. If you have not made the acquaintance of Pirifom Speccy in Windows, it is free to download from https://www.piriform.com/speccy
... you could run it and provide us a with a link to the report it generates (no privacy issues involved), then we will know what we are dealing with.

Then in Windows, you can use Rufus or Yumi, or a Windows facility, to burn the iso to your removable medium.

I will be in and out during my Saturday morning here in Oz, but if someone else picks up the ball and runs with it, they will likely have good advice.

Wizard

BTW just noted Rob has entered the building, you are in safe hands, lol.
Edited - added BTW
What is the full name of the USB-boot option? I see two of each (DVD and USB)
It's 64bit, I'm running. I have the PRO version of Speccy, so no worries.

I'll figure the report thing out - and I have downloaded the Universal USB Installer from pendrivelinux.com

Report update: Do you want it as 'text' or 'XML'?
 

atanere

Well-Known Member
Hi @DontBeADouce, and welcome to the forums! These guys have you on the right track, but when you are new to Linux it is sometimes hard to follow along as many things are different from Windows. You have the right tool now to make your Linux USB... the Universal USB Installer will work fine. But just a few more things for me to ask you to clarify:

Your Linux .iso is more than just "amd64.iso"... it is a longer name that says which distro and what version. Distro names are like Debian, Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Fedora (and hundreds more besides). The version number is different between the different distros, so we would like to know that to help ensure you are installing the latest version, or sometimes NOT the latest version but instead the LTS version (long term support) so that you will continue to get updates for several years instead of months.

You didn't say what version of Windows, and that is often important too. Windows 8 and 10 have some special issues (such as fastboot) that doesn't apply to older Windows.

Because you are very new, I can't caution you enough that installing Linux is a risky process... you may encounter problems that will cause your computer not to boot up at all in Windows or Linux. These problems are not permanent, but you may lose data on your hard drive, so it is extremely important that you backup everything that is important. You should also check to see if your Windows version will let you make a "System Recovery" (may be on USB or DVD's). If things get hosed up, you will need this System Recovery to get your Windows back.

To protect yourself from a disaster like I just described, I like to recommend that you boot up on the Linux USB that you will create, and just run Linux in "live mode" for awhile... and don't click the Install icon that you'll find on the Linux desktop. Running Linux on the USB in "live mode" is a little slower than installed to the hard drive, but not much. And when you're done for that session, just shut down the Linux system and remove the USB and your next boot will be back to Windows with no harm done. Another method is to install VirtualBox (free) in your Windows, and then install Linux in VirtualBox. This makes Linux seem more like an app than an operating system, but it will not make damaging changes to your Windows install or hard drive, so it is also a very safe method to start getting your feet wet with Linux.

Whatever you choose, good luck, and welcome to the fun and exciting world of Linux! :D
 

DontBeADouce

New Member
Hi @DontBeADouce, and welcome to the forums! These guys have you on the right track, but when you are new to Linux it is sometimes hard to follow along as many things are different from Windows. You have the right tool now to make your Linux USB... the Universal USB Installer will work fine. But just a few more things for me to ask you to clarify:

Your Linux .iso is more than just "amd64.iso"... it is a longer name that says which distro and what version. Distro names are like Debian, Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Fedora (and hundreds more besides). The version number is different between the different distros, so we would like to know that to help ensure you are installing the latest version, or sometimes NOT the latest version but instead the LTS version (long term support) so that you will continue to get updates for several years instead of months.

You didn't say what version of Windows, and that is often important too. Windows 8 and 10 have some special issues (such as fastboot) that doesn't apply to older Windows.

Because you are very new, I can't caution you enough that installing Linux is a risky process... you may encounter problems that will cause your computer not to boot up at all in Windows or Linux. These problems are not permanent, but you may lose data on your hard drive, so it is extremely important that you backup everything that is important. You should also check to see if your Windows version will let you make a "System Recovery" (may be on USB or DVD's). If things get hosed up, you will need this System Recovery to get your Windows back.

To protect yourself from a disaster like I just described, I like to recommend that you boot up on the Linux USB that you will create, and just run Linux in "live mode" for awhile... and don't click the Install icon that you'll find on the Linux desktop. Running Linux on the USB in "live mode" is a little slower than installed to the hard drive, but not much. And when you're done for that session, just shut down the Linux system and remove the USB and your next boot will be back to Windows with no harm done. Another method is to install VirtualBox (free) in your Windows, and then install Linux in VirtualBox. This makes Linux seem more like an app than an operating system, but it will not make damaging changes to your Windows install or hard drive, so it is also a very safe method to start getting your feet wet with Linux.

Whatever you choose, good luck, and welcome to the fun and exciting world of Linux! :D
First off - thank you a lot! I can't wait, to get going.
Next off, I want to try Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS, but since I have a Intel processor, will the amd64 work?

I have a back-up, from a few days ago. I have Windows 10 Home, btw.
I've tried VirtualBox, but I didn't like it.

UPDATE: I actually want to try out Linux Mint (MATE) 18.1 - instead.
 
Last edited:

atanere

Well-Known Member
Well, I think you are about ready to get going! Ubuntu is a good choice for a beginner and very popular. The 16.04 is the latest LTS so it will be supported until April of 2021 if you leave it installed that long. You've backed up important files... check. You didn't mention making the "System Recovery" though. Most big brands (Dell, HP, Acer, Asus, etc) have an app that will let you create this recovery set and I do highly recommend that you do it before you attempt to actually install Ubuntu.

OK on VirtualBox. Its a good way to go, but its not for everyone. The "amd64" is actually what you want... though I get the confusion between "AMD" and "Intel." So no problem there. I'd say use the Universal USB Installer to create your Ubuntu USB anytime now. That installer unpacks the .iso file in a special way and makes the USB stick bootable. There is a special feature called "persistence" that it will also implement if you want, but it isn't necessary. Persistence allows the USB stick to also save some information when you are running it in "live mode." This is handy, for example, to save your home WiFi network password so you don't have to connect manually every time you boot on the USB.

Oh, about the Universal USB Installer... it may appear to freeze for a good while while making your Ubuntu USB. Seriously... it seems like a LONG WHILE. Just wait for it and it will finish eventually. Also remember that this process will erase anything that is on the USB stick when you begin.

Still hold off on installing for a little longer. You've got to get it to boot up, and spend a bit of time checking it out in "live mode" first. Getting it to boot on a Windows 10 computer may take a few attempts, but you'll get it soon. One problem is if you do a full shutdown of Windows, it often DOES NOT shut down... it goes into hibernation instead. A simple trick that may work is to boot Windows first (and plug in your Ubuntu USB)... then choose to RESTART Windows. Using restart bypasses the hibernation process. When the computer is restarting, with the black screen before Windows starts, watch for any text (in the corners usually) that may tell you to hit some F-key for a Boot Menu, like F-10, or F-11. You may see other options, like to "Enter Setup" or "Enter BIOS" but "Boot Menu" is what you want, so you can choose the USB stick to boot on. You have to be very quick or else Windows will start and you'll have to try again. If it asks if you want "UEFI boot" on the USB, yes you do. Ubuntu understands UEFI pretty well now.

But... if you don't see any text at the black screen with any way to choose the Boot Menu (or if it doesn't boot on the USB automatically) and it boots Windows every time, then there are even more hoops to jump through. (You can thank Microsoft for all of this! LOL) Well, I will stop now as this is getting long. If it doesn't give you the Boot Menu, we will explore it further to make it work. You may have to get into the UEFI settings to change a few things (disable Fastboot, put USB first in your boot order) but Windows 10 sometimes make this overly complicated.

I'm going out for the evening and have to work tomorrow, so I may not be back for a bit. But others can also jump in and keep you on track. You're doing fine!
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
@DontBeADouce

This from howtogeek.com -

To check whether you’re using a 32-bit or 64-bit version of Windows 10, open the Settings app by pressing Windows+I, and then head to System > About. On the right side, look for the “System type” entry. It will show you two pieces of information—whether you’re using a 32-bit or 64-bit operating system and whether you have a 64-bit capable processor.
With Speccy, when you generate the report, it will place it at a unique URL for you on the Internet. You need simply then just provide us with the link, and we can all go take a look.

With Linux Mint MATE (a good choice, as is Ubuntu), we will be getting it from here:

https://www.linuxmint.com/download.php

... once we know what your computer will support.

With UUI from Pendrive - it has an option to install "Persistence". If we follow as @atanere has suggested, of your getting practice with a live stick, then use a stick that is at least 4-8GB, and choose a couple of GB (up to 4) for the Persistence. You can read about Persistence at Pendrive as well.

Try not to get ahead of us, you may make mistakes and have to go back, and we will have a hard time keeping up with where you are at. But we understand and applaud your enthusiasm, lol.

An example of not getting ahead would include that one of my friends would have suggested Unetbootin as the burning option, as it is cross-platform and can be used later under a purely Linux environment, where UUI is restricted to Windows. Unetbootin is in the Software Repositories of both Ubuntu and Linux Mint, so you can get it later, or else you can visit https://unetbootin.github.io/

Cheers

Wizard

Just noticed Atanere's input but have not read yet, back soon.
 

DontBeADouce

New Member
I'm going to bed, so I will read your full replies, tomorrow.

Anyways, the USB is done and ready.
Ofc! I absolutely love Linux & Open-Source software.

No private data?
There's an IP, my programs, update services, the name of my computer, things like mouse and other things through USB-ports, the brand of my PC, process list, my location and language, services and even more.

No way, I'm giving you that. Goodnight.
 
Last edited:

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
No way, I'm giving you that. Goodnight.
Your call, although dozens of Windows users I know incorporate Speccy into their signatures, but you are at the steering wheel of your computer.

There's an article here https://www.windowscentral.com/how-check-your-computer-full-specifications-windows-10
... that may be more to your liking, and the line in particular which states

"System Type - 64-bit operating system, x64-based processor" (my bolding) is what I do not think we have determined yet?

But as you have the USB stick already done now, I'll leave it to you to see how it goes in your morning.

Cheers

Wizard
 

atanere

Well-Known Member
If it's a 32-bit CPU it will fail to boot the 64-bit Linux USB (and Linux will report this problem), but I've never seen any modern computers with 32-bit CPU's. I do know that there are 32-bit editions of Windows 10, and I have not yet heard what, if any, effect that has on their UEFI. With very rare exceptions, Linux must be 64-bit editions in order to work with UEFI.

Another issue we have not yet brought up is "Secure Boot"... but we'll cross that bridge when/if we must. :eek:
 

DontBeADouce

New Member
If it's a 32-bit CPU it will fail to boot the 64-bit Linux USB (and Linux will report this problem), but I've never seen any modern computers with 32-bit CPU's. I do know that there are 32-bit editions of Windows 10, and I have not yet heard what, if any, effect that has on their UEFI. With very rare exceptions, Linux must be 64-bit editions in order to work with UEFI.

Another issue we have not yet brought up is "Secure Boot"... but we'll cross that bridge when/if we must. :eek:
Should I disable secure-boot? Everything is 64Bit.
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
My bad, the OP said at #7:

It's 64bit, I'm running.
... I had missed it somehow, if the Win 10 is 64, then the CPU is 64.

Others are better equipped than I to handle secure boot issues, so I will leave that alone.

DBAD, the .iso you should have downloaded is linuxmint-18.1-mate-64bit.iso ... is that correct?

sha1sum for that is ff18ae5f5a5f813dc9f44d85116aa4f9bb11a62c

and sha256 is b41c5258c03bd8fe4ecab5f1db33f4484bd1992ec306ea4bdde25fc7d6ea2f40

If you are not familiar with hash check algorithms (a lot of Windows folk are not), in Windows you can download and install the Microsoft File Checksum Integrity Verifier or Windows users may have other alternatives.

Clem Lefebvre (Project Leader, LInux Mint) does not make it easy to find, but his page for the sums is as follows:

https://linuxmint.com/verify.php

Cheers

Wizard

BTW - for Windows users, Raymond's have this at https://www.raymond.cc/blog/7-tools-verify-file-integrity-using-md5-sha1-hashes/2/
... it was updated 6 months ago, but I am unaware how it goes with Win 10, also it may have an error if MS's FCIV works, albeit that has to be downloaded and installed, so it may be a question of interpretation where he says Windows does not have a solution.

Also be aware that md5 is basically a dinosaur now, and sha1 will follow. Wizard's crystal ball says 256 will be the industry standard before year's end.

For Linux users, you could do worse than use GTKHash, see my Tute here -
https://www.linux.org/threads/gtkhash-–-hashing-out-the-basics.4430/

and we also have a couple of commands we can use from Terminal.

Edited - added BTW
 
Last edited:

atanere

Well-Known Member
Should I disable secure-boot? Everything is 64Bit.
Don't disable Secure Boot right off the bat, but you may need to eventually. This guy insists that Linux Mint works with Secure Boot left enabled.

The first thing is... did you find the "Boot Menu" (before Windows starts) and have you been able to boot the USB? If you can't boot it, you can't install it. Once booted, look around and experiment with it for a bit... see that it uses your WiFi interface, your sound system, etc. But if the USB still doesn't boot, then you'll have to look at some of those UEFI settings. Remember that this is the part that can break Windows, so you don't want to rush too quickly. If it's booting, run it a number of times to know that it is consistent for you, and you should note that the "persistence" feature worked and it should remember your WiFi network.
 

liliana scott

New Member
Hello,

I have had a similar scenario last week, I have googled and found some solutions (which works for me)

Do this: Under the Advanced startup, click Restart now. Select Troubleshoot > Advanced Options > UEFI Firmware settings and then Restart. In the UEFI/BIOS settings menu, choose to boot from the USB. Plugin your bootable Linux installation drive and restart your PC.

Thanks,
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Why have you linked to Manjaro downloads?

Wizard
 


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