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If I allocate 20GB partition for ubuntu, does that mean I can't install anything more than 20GB?

balenshah

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How much partition should I give to Ubuntu vs Windows 10 on dual boot? I don't think I'm coming back to windows 10 but just in case some errors happen, as I'm a beginner user, I'd have to come back to Windows 10.
I am trying to understand if I give only 20GB partition for ubuntu, can I install anything other than 20GB?
Also should change BIOS mode to UEFI? Or is legacy alright? Will legacy BIOS create problems in the future?
 
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Condobloke

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If that is how much you allow Ubuntu, then that is what it has.

It cannot grow itself.

How big is the hard drive/ssd ?
 
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balenshah

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If that is how much you allow Ubuntu, then that is what it has.

It cannot grow itself.

How big is the hard drive/ssd ?
1TB SSD, 1TB Hard drive. My question would be does Ubuntu installs everything(apps) in root? Or is there a good way to install stuffs in other parts.
I have 2 drives for SSD i.e C and D.
Then 4 for HDD i.e E,F,G,H.
 
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Condobloke

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To give you an example.....amount of space used in a typical installation:

i have a 250GB M.2 drive

I use it for Linux Mint 21......nothing else. When I installed Linux Mint, I allowed the installer to do the job for me....no manual partitioning.

At the moment I have 213GB free space on that drive. I do not use very many apps/programs.
I could easily install 100GB of fresh apps and everything would still work ok. (That is an enormous quantity of apps !!!....not necessary!)

I have a 1TB external hard drive, which has all my tv shows on it.......they are there until I watch them and then I delete them....but others take their place. At the moment the !TB is approx half full. It rarely gets any more on it than this
It also has 3 Timeshift snapshots on it. I only take one snapshot per day and timeshift automatically keeps 2 of them....anything older is deleted automatically. This drive is formatted to ext4 ....this is a must for timeshift. It does not worry the movies, tv shows etc

I have another 1TB external hard drive which keeps my backups and anything else that is important to me...legal documents & pictures etc...it is currently only using around 140GB

It is far simpler to keep ALL of ubuntu on one disc.....you are a new user, dont try to take on more than you can handle. get yourself to a place where you can understand the process.....then go ahead and do it. Take your time.

Limit the number of apps/programs you install...too many is just a waste of good space. Be 'choosy' .....Only install what you actually need.


You have plenty of room.
Work out how to divide your ssd in half......Ubuntu on one half and windows on the other half?.... ....use the 1TB hard drive for storing pics, music, other data, movies, tv shows, whatever....?


Worth a read..
 

Condobloke

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The best advice this forum can give you....is....Slow Down.

You are trying to do too many things at once and as a result not achieving anything properly
 

kc1di

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You really should have at least 30 to 40 Gbs for Ubuntu. that would give you enough room to add some apps and store a few things like pics, ETC. Most Apps in Linux are installed in what is called the (/) partition. If you use the Ubuntu format you will only have the one partition. Which will contain every thing. I prefer to have at least 2 partitions #1 (/) The other a #2 (/home) partition. Just helps keep things in order. But for smooth operating at least 30 to 40 Gbs for the (/) commonly called the root partition.
Good Luck and don't rush it take your time and learn. Enjoy the process. (Note: You'll get varying Ideas about the size partitions you need, but it really depends on the individual needs of each op. For some 20gbs may be enough. For me it would not be.)
 
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kc1di

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MikeWalsh

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@balenshah :-

20 GB is ample for installing the OS itself, and lots of applications. As @kc1di says, however, 30-40 GB would be better.

Suggestions? Well, a sensible precaution is to keep all personal data in an external directory (Linux word for 'folder'), then sym-link it into your 'home', user directory. I suggest this in all seriousness, because most Linux newbies end up 'borking' their system at some point, and need to re-install. Some don't learn from their mistakes, and seem doomed to repeat those mistakes time and time again!

This way, you can re-install as often as you like, but personal data never gets touched. It can also be 'shared' between more than one distro, if you end up multi-booting, as many of us do.

-------------------------------------

The other thing you need to watch out for is a build-up of old kernels over time. These never get deleted by the system, and periodically need to be manually deleted by the user. I have heard of people with a smallish partition where the whole system grinds to a halt because of too many old kernels jamming things up.

In all honesty, you really only need to keep the previous two. Sometimes, a kernel upgrade will change things in your system that aren't to your liking, and you may wish to revert to an older version.

-----------------------------------

Plenty of other suggestions will come your way, I'm sure!


Mike. ;)
 
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Brickwizard

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In line with my esteemed associates, I also recommend a Minimum of 30 to 40 GB for any main line Linux, the question is more of how much do you need for windows and all your programs and files, then double it, making sure when you partition your drive you leave at least that amount for windows.
 
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bob466

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When I install a Distro...I install it to the whole Drive eg...on a 500GB SSD after instillation and formatting by the installer...my Root partition is 460GB.

I don't dual-boot...I use Virtualbox and have 3 VMs at the moment totalling 90GB which on a Root partition of 460GB is no problem and have plenty of space left for everything else.
happy0035.gif


I stopped creating partitions years ago as I don't see the need anymore but that's my opinion...another thing to remember is...you must have at least 20% of free space to run efficiently...I don't see how this could work when the partition is 40GB because you would have only 8GB of free space and that would fill up at the drop of a hat.
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Anyway after installation and adding all my software...browsers and settings...I then create an image with Foxclone which is stored on an external HDD...should anything happen...I just re-image the Drive with nothing lost...certainly beats re-installing the Distro and everything else too.
happy0034.gif


Of cause at the end of the day the choice is always yours...good luck.
happy0043.gif
 

wizardfromoz

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The other thing you need to watch out for is a build-up of old kernels over time. These never get deleted by the system, and periodically need to be manually deleted by the user.

Not always, Mike. You can often set the number of kernels to be kept.

In Fedora for example, you just go in to /etc/dnf/dnf.conf and change the numeric limit from a default of 3 to what you want. When the limit is exceeded, the excess kernel/s is/are culled.

Avagudweegend, all

Wiz
 

Condobloke

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Likewise, in Linux Mint 21, there is a setting to auto remove obsolete kernels and dependencies.
 

bob466

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I run a Terminal command to remove old Kernels or select Remove Old Kernels in the Update Manager.
m1212.gif
 

kc1di

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If you are running a Ubuntu based distro there is also a tool called ubuntu-cleaner which will remove old kernels.
It has to be installed from a PPA though found here. (Note: Be careful as you can delete things you do not want to delete.)

 

MikeWalsh

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That's fair comment, guys.

As y'all are probably aware, Puppy doesn't follow the crowd in many of these types of utilities, nor even in standard operating procedures. She does things in her own unique way.....much of which is manually-controlled, since the majority of Puppians prefer to do things in this manner.

Horses for courses.


Mike. ;)
 

bob466

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If I have a 40GB Root partition...how do I fit 90GBs of VMs in to it. ?
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