Is my OS treating my processor the same as it would an intel?

CrazedNerd

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I have an AMD Ryzen 5 5600G with Radeon Graphics, yet it seems to have the same architecture as intel machines (it reads as x86_64). Here's the full printout. Also, how on here do you format your output so that it looks like code? I tried to clean this up a little bit, but of course it's still a little wonkey:

Architecture: x86_64
CPU op-mode(s): 32-bit, 64-bit
Byte Order: Little Endian
Address sizes: 48 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
CPU(s): 12
On-line CPU(s) list: 0-11
Thread(s) per core: 2
Core(s) per socket: 6
Socket(s): 1
NUMA node(s): 1
Vendor ID: AuthenticAMD
CPU family: 25
Model: 80
Model name: AMD Ryzen 5 5600G with Radeon Graphics
Stepping: 0
Frequency boost: enabled
CPU MHz: 1400.000
CPU max MHz: 4463.6709
CPU min MHz: 1400.0000
BogoMIPS: 7785.69
Virtualization: AMD-V
L1d cache: 192 KiB
L1i cache: 192 KiB
L2 cache: 3 MiB
L3 cache: 16 MiB
NUMA node0 CPU(s): 0-11
Vulnerability Itlb multihit: Not affected
Vulnerability L1tf: Not affected
Vulnerability Mds: Not affected
Vulnerability Meltdown: Not affected
Vulnerability Spec store bypass: Mitigation; Speculative Store Bypass disabled v
ia prctl and seccomp
Vulnerability Spectre v1: Mitigation; usercopy/swapgs barriers and __user
pointer sanitization
Vulnerability Spectre v2: Mitigation; Full AMD retpoline, IBPB conditiona
l, IBRS_FW, STIBP always-on, RSB filling
Vulnerability Srbds: Not affected
Vulnerability Tsx async abort: Not affected
Flags: fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtr
r pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush mmx fxsr sse s
se2 ht syscall nx mmxext fxsr_opt pdpe1gb rdtsc
p lm constant_tsc rep_good nopl nonstop_tsc cpu
id extd_apicid aperfmperf pni pclmulqdq monitor
ssse3 fma cx16 sse4_1 sse4_2 movbe popcnt aes
xsave avx f16c rdrand lahf_lm cmp_legacy svm ex
tapic cr8_legacy abm sse4a misalignsse 3dnowpre
fetch osvw ibs skinit wdt tce topoext perfctr_c
ore perfctr_nb bpext perfctr_llc mwaitx cpb cat
_l3 cdp_l3 hw_pstate ssbd mba ibrs ibpb stibp v
mmcall fsgsbase bmi1 avx2 smep bmi2 erms invpci
d cqm rdt_a rdseed adx smap clflushopt clwb sha
_ni xsaveopt xsavec xgetbv1 xsaves cqm_llc cqm_
occup_llc cqm_mbm_total cqm_mbm_local clzero ir
perf xsaveerptr rdpru wbnoinvd arat npt lbrv sv
m_lock nrip_save tsc_scale vmcb_clean flushbyas
id decodeassists pausefilter pfthreshold avic v
_vmsave_vmload vgif umip pku ospke vaes vpclmul
qdq rdpid overflow_recov succor smca fsrm
 


brickwizard

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Not quite sure what you mean, Intel was developing its own x64 processors, but were late to the market with them, AMD had already taken the lead in mainstream computing processors, hence 64-bit processors are referred to as 86_64 or AMD 64...

I quote." In 2004 Intel, reacting to the market success of AMD, admits it has been developing a clone of the AMD64 extensions named IA-32e (later renamed EM64T, then yet again renamed to Intel 64). Intel ships updated versions of its Xeon and Pentium 4 processor families supporting the new 64-bit instruction set."
 
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CrazedNerd

CrazedNerd

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Not quite sure what you mean, Intel was developing its own x64 processors, but were late to the market with them, AMD had already taken the lead in mainstream computing processors, hence 64-bit processors are referred to as 86_64 or AMD 64...

I quote." In 2004 Intel, reacting to the market success of AMD, admits it has been developing a clone of the AMD64 extensions named IA-32e (later renamed EM64T, then yet again renamed to Intel 64). Intel ships updated versions of its Xeon and Pentium 4 processor families supporting the new 64-bit instruction set."

Ah, well i just always assumed that Intel were the first in the market to come up with the 64-bit instruction set because they seem to have the name-famous processors, "AMD has heating issues...", sometimes it's nice to know you didn't know something...i was researching this because eventually i do want to be able to assembly language professionally, i found a neat book but i'm just not there yet, i've got a web development and C++ book to plow through, i'd assume that i'll be more than ready to tackle that once i've got these tomes of knowledge under my belt...i could probably start with the assembly language right away (i already learned a bit from this free book i found...) but i am in no hurry, i don't think anyone learns very well when they are in a hurry.

i've always been open to AMD but i figure things aren't so simple, my first desktop had intel because i figured you'd never buy a car if you knew the engine was prone to over-heating...so...
 

brickwizard

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From my personal view as a Hardware man, Intel initially designed the 32-bit processor and licenced its manufacture to around a dozen companies, before moving into manufacturing, although fully interchangeable, I always found the American micro devices 486 far more stable than Intel, the initial p [pentium] range from Intel were dreadful, so personally I stuck with AMD and their K series, from there the Athlon 64-bit processors, My last AMD home build threw a wobbly during the first covid lockdown in the UK, none of my suppliers were open for spares, so I bought an HP desktop with I5 processor, I have never been happy with it, I find it slow when rendering large files and a bit temperamental.
 
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CrazedNerd

CrazedNerd

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From my personal view as a Hardware man, Intel initially designed the 32-bit processor and licenced its manufacture to around a dozen companies, before moving into manufacturing, although fully interchangeable, I always found the American micro devices 486 far more stable than Intel, the initial p [pentium] range from Intel were dreadful, so personally I stuck with AMD and their K series, from there the Athlon 64-bit processors, My last AMD home build threw a wobbly during the first covid lockdown in the UK, none of my suppliers were open for spares, so I bought an HP desktop with I5 processor, I have never been happy with it, I find it slow when rendering large files and a bit temperamental.

i think part of your issue is that it's an HP desktop, they are famous for their printers, yet to me their printers have always been trash, i've had much smooth sailing so far with brother. Yet, i've noticed that overall if you can put a nice computer build together, it's always better than a laptop. My old desktop which is currently defective for reasons i outlined in my other thread always function so smoothly, but if you leave it on for a 4+ hours then it starts getting slow and speeds up when you restart it. Anyways, good industry secrets brickwizard...

My Dell laptop is still working after several years, part of the reason it works so well is i put an SDD in there...
 

gvisoc

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My old desktop which is currently defective for reasons i outlined in my other thread always function so smoothly, but if you leave it on for a 4+ hours then it starts getting slow and speeds up when you restart it. Anyways, good industry secrets brickwizard...
That sounds like it's throttling down due to thermal issues, and the reboot cycle gives time enough for the heat sink to cool down the casing just enough to have that effect. Have you replaced the thermal paste recently? If you didn't, maybe you want to apply new paste to see if it improves; if you did, maybe you've just put too much and it's creating bubbles between the heat sink and the CPU.
 
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CrazedNerd

CrazedNerd

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That sounds like it's throttling down due to thermal issues, and the reboot cycle gives time enough for the heat sink to cool down the casing just enough to have that effect. Have you replaced the thermal paste recently? If you didn't, maybe you want to apply new paste to see if it improves; if you did, maybe you've just put too much and it's creating bubbles between the heat sink and the CPU.

Hmmm, will do, before i buy any new computer parts (i just dropped over $900 to build this mini-ITX machine i got entirely for exploring linux operating systems and programming) i intent to put the parts again without the hard drives in order to figure out what happened. Long story short, last time i tried to turn it on it smoked and failed to get started. I'll be sure to clean the CPU again, applying new paste. I took the thing apart and i didn't see any signs of burn anywhere, so i figured this wouldn't hurt as long as i tried to protect my files.
 

gvisoc

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That smoke can come from the PSU, if there are no signs of anything burned in the mother board.

While it may be just a capacitor blown, opening and touching the guts of a PSU can yield nasty and painful, dangerous electric discharges. If after a second look all other parts seem ok, throw some bucks in a modular PSU, 750W or more.

The “modular” part makes them more expensive but it’s pure gold for cable management, which reverts in better thermal performance for the whole setup. The 750W will pay off if you want to stick a beefy GPU, or plenty of cards and drives.
 
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