Just a general aside Query regarding browsers.

Nik-Ken-Bah

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To many of you may think this question a bit silly but Linux is not Vindows.
With browsers they are able to sit along side each other on the task bar, true?
I am asking just clarify my mind as I have a few things that are taking up my mind and Linux is at the moment is not high on the priority list of my thoughts.
 


D

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FWIW.

Browsers are browsers and one browser ain't no better than the other browser imo.

I use Firefox and Firefox ESR because both come with the Linux Distros I use and I hate Google Chrome and ain't to fond of Chromium either.

Push come to shove they all collect you personal data regardless of what users think it's called polling.

If whatever browser gets you to where you what to go then it's all good and yes they can all ride side by side to each other without conflict from my experience.

Hope the few things that are taking up the mind get resolved / figured out etc.

Life is good because the Lord has given me another day to complain, bitch and moan. :p:D
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

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Hope the few things that are taking up the mind get resolved / figured out etc.
Thanks for that poorguy. I don't think that some of what I am thinking upon will ever get resolved in the near future to many fools running this world. As Casimir Delavigne said many many moons ago now "Ever since Adam’s time fools have been in the majority. "

Yes! Life is good and for me to awake and greet the glow of dawn I am thankful that I have another day to love, laugh with family and friends.
 

smooth_buddha

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firefox its solid for me. it came with my distro and ive ad no reason to try another one. it runs real smooth always gets me to the site i want , hasnt crashed since ive used it! i think all browsers are pretty much at similar standard, i would only change browser if i was constantly running into issues with crashing and pages not loading corectly but so far firefox has proven a solid browser - it does what its told lol
 

Vrai

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firefox its solid for me. it came with my distro and ive ad no reason to try another one. it runs real smooth always gets me to the site i want , hasnt crashed since ive used it! i think all browsers are pretty much at similar standard, i would only change browser if i was constantly running into issues with crashing and pages not loading corectly but so far firefox has proven a solid browser - it does what its told lol
I generally like to have an additional browser installed for a 'back-up' in case one stops working.
 

wizardfromoz

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I generally like to have an additional browser installed for a 'back-up' in case one stops working.
eminently practical :)

it is hard to ask for online help with your bricked browser if you only have one rig and no phone internet.

multi-multi-booting addresses that issue to an extent, but i prefer to have 2 browsers and that is firefox and chromium. i have been with firefox since version 1.0 in 2004, and my first 10 years were under windows, so transition to linux was easy.

some distros have a different default, such as elementary os with epiphany.

then there is brave browser, which i learned about from @Rob here

https://linux.org/threads/firefox-meltdown.23292/post-69313

another one of interest, derived from firefox is waterfox, by alex kontos

https://www.waterfox.net/

if you like firefox, you will have few problems with waterfox, and it employs a simpler profile structure to transfer from one install to another.

i have it now on about 60 of my distros.

avagudweegend all

wiz
 

JasKinasis

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I use Firefox and Chrome - with ad-blockers and a few other privacy related extensions.

I also recommend having a terminal based browser like w3m or lynx installed too.
Comes in handy in cases where you have a problem and you only have a terminal available.
e.g. X fails to start, or the desktop session crashes, but you can still reach a terminal.

That way you can search for a solution to your problem from inside the terminal - without having to use the browser on your phone, or another computer/device.
w3m has saved my bacon a few times.

Also comes in handy when working in the terminal and you want to look something up quickly, without having to wait for a grapical browser to start up! I've written a few scripts that use w3m to search duckduckgo, google, or search online dictionary/thesaurus websites.
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

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then there is brave browser,
That is the one I was thinking of as it has a few features I like.
But the thing is I have this script to download Brave but I was wondering do I split it up into lines
or do I just copy the whole thing to terminal?

sudo apt install apt-transport-https curl

curl -s https://brave-browser-apt-release.s3.brave.com/brave-core.asc | sudo apt-key --keyring /etc/apt/trusted.gpg.d/brave-browser-release.gpg add -

echo "deb [arch=amd64] https://brave-browser-apt-release.s3.brave.com/ stable main" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/brave-browser-release.list

sudo apt update

sudo apt install brave-browser

Also copied the PGP key.
How do I use it to verify the download?
#------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------#

I also run Firefox on windows but like all open source progs Vindows didn't like it but that was about 10years or more ago.
 

wizardfromoz

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just a holding post davy - will look at this tomorrow

cheers

chris
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

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wizardfromoz

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slow and painful, got a 2nd teleconference scheduled with doctors 100 miles away but not until 27th march, so i am a misery guts still. ta for asking. :)

you can type in the individual commands from that script and it works fine. i would suggest that first if you have not done so, but we can build a script for you to use any time in future if you just sing out, it's quite simple

cheers

chris
ps haven't checked out the pgp yet, maybe tomorrow
 

Serafim

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I spend a lot of time on the internet and I have a selection of browsers. I use Pale Moon as the default and I honestly cannot explain why. I also use some others depending on what I am up to at the moment.
Brave, Chrome, Chromium and Tor, though as Brave has the option to open a Tor-enabled window I tend to use the Tor browser less and less. Occasionally I use Firefox ESR but that is very rare. Just for the fun of being anonymous I use Brave with a Tor-enabled window quite often (but as said above Pale Moon is the default).
As for the Brave browser and for the fact that I run Debian on all of my computers as well as on my two servers, I simply copied the lines for Debian on the Brave download page into a script, added an extra "apt update" at the beginning of the script, removed all the "sudo" and ran it as root on each computer.
The downside of Brave is that it is slow to start on a newly started computer and that, because of all the security measures it takes, a few sites don't work as intended.
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

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The downside of Brave is that it is slow to start on a newly started computer and that, because of all the security measures it takes, a few sites don't work as intended.
Thanks for the heads up in regards to Brave's operation.

You don't need to. You've imported the key into apt's keyring.
As long as you have apt-transport-https installed - apt will use the key to verify the package.
Thanks for that info appreciated.
but we can build a script for you to use any time in future if you just sing out, it's quite simple
Thanks for that.
What I will do is give it a burl as is following your suggestions
But having the script for future use will also be good. :) But there is time and as Ralph said

5680
 

wizardfromoz

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on a script

here is what I am doing. My disclaimer is that my scripting knowledge is sketchy, but what I create works. If there is a better way or I am in error, I invite jas @JasKinasis to qualify. Jas is the man for scripting, lol.

Start by assigning a spot to house your custom-built scripts.

Many use /usr/local/bin. If you are one who takes their home folder or partition with them to use in another distro, you could store it in home.

If you use /usr/remainder_of_path bear in mind that is under root control. Home is always available to the designated user. If you have other users on the computer, you may consider housing scripts in a /share/ subfolder.

For this exercise, I am generating a script called bravedeb.sh – so named because I will also make ones called braverpm.sh and bravearc.sh for rpm-based and arch-based distros I use. I am going to create a folder in home called bin – you might choose bin/scripts, or other, just make the adjustments below.

For our shell – in most cases, bash – to locate and execute our scripts, where we store them should either be in our Path, or added to our Path. To see your current path, type and enter, in terminal

echo $PATH

mine in linux mint 19.3 ‘tricia’ cinnamon looks as follows – the entries are separated by a colon :

/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/games:/usr/local/games

STAGE 1

STEPS TO CREATE OUR SCRIPT FILE


1. in a fresh instance of terminal, type and enter as follows:

echo $PATH

mine shows as follows, yours may differ

/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/games:/usr/local/games

2. making the folder to store the script/s -

mkdir bin

3. create an empty file for the script

touch bin/bravedeb.sh

4. open the file with a text editor – I will be using nano, but if you prefer gui-based you could use xed in mint, or gedit in ubuntu, kate in a kde environment. If so, just call it from terminal (needs sudo) so that when you exit the editor, you are returned to terminal.

nano bin/bravedeb.sh

5. copy the text nik-ken-bah had above, which you can also find at

https://brave-browser.readthedocs.io/en/latest/installing-brave.html#linux

and use ctrl-shift-v to paste it into the nano shell, or just ctrl-v if using a gui-based editor.

Again, that text was

sudo apt install apt-transport-https curl

curl -s https://brave-browser-apt-release.s3.brave.com/brave-core.asc | sudo apt-key --keyring /etc/apt/trusted.gpg.d/brave-browser-release.gpg add -

echo "deb [arch=amd64] https://brave-browser-apt-release.s3.brave.com/ stable main" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/brave-browser-release.list

sudo apt update

sudo apt install brave-browser

6. navigate to the top of your text editor, and at ‘s’ for sudo, place at least 2 enters to get a couple of lines

7. with the first line enter

#!/bin/bash

this tells linux that it is dealing with a bash script, and it is the only line starting with a hash that linux takes notice of.

I then type in a couple of lines prefaced with a hash, which means they are explanatory comments – helpful for others who use the script, or you if you forget, lol.

Including those comments, my final text for the script looks as follows:

#!/bin/bash

# A script to install Brave Browser on Debian-based Distros
# My first script for the folks at linux.org
# Written by wizardfromoz 20/03/11 ... enjoy your Linux!
# Source code from https://brave-browser.readthedocs.io/en/latest/installing-brave.html#linux

sudo apt install apt-transport-https curl

curl -s https://brave-browser-apt-release.s3.brave.com/brave-core.asc | sudo apt-key --keyring /etc/apt/trusted.gpg.d/brave-browser-release.gpg add -

echo "deb [arch=amd64] https://brave-browser-apt-release.s3.brave.com/ stable main" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/brave-browser-release.list

sudo apt update

sudo apt install brave-browser


8. save and close the file and its editor and you will be returned to your terminal prompt.

In nano, this is done by

pressing ^x (ctrl-x)

which returns

Save modified buffer? (Answering "No" will DISCARD changes.)

enter uppercase Y for yes

which returns

File Name to Write: bin/bravedeb.sh

if you want to do a save as feature or name it something completely different now is your chance. Otherwise press enter.


9. now we need to make our script executable. We can look at its attributes and permissions with

ls -l bin/bravedeb.sh

which for me returns

-rw-r--r-- 1 chris chris 656 Mar 11 16:10 bin/bravedeb.sh


which shows me the file, 656 bytes in size, created today, can be read and written to by root, read by me and read by others.

To make that simply executable, for now you could use the command

sudo chmod +x bin/bravedeb.sh

which with the ls -l command would return

-rwxr-xr-x 1 chris chris 656 Mar 11 16:10 bin/bravedeb.sh

which means that root can read, write and execute the file, I can read and execute but not write to it, and other users can read it and execute it.

That will do if you want to just install the Brave Browser, and if so, skip now to the next step.

I, however, may wish to alter the script later, so I am using

sudo chmod 775 bin/bravedeb.sh

which, using our ls, returns

-rwxrwxr-x 1 chris chris 656 Mar 11 14:15 bin/bravedeb.sh

… what I desire.

10. Check using terminal or your file manager that all is in order and where it should be. If using your file manager, you can right-click the file and check its properties to see that it is executable.

Then move on.

STAGE 2

STEPS TO ACCESS THE SCRIPT FROM ANYWHERE IN TERMINAL (OPTIONAL)


if you are in /var reading logs, or /usr exporting .jpegs to .png backgrounds ala wallpapers, you may decide you wish to install Brave Browser using the script.

You can either add it to your Path, or else choose the full path for the script.

If the latter then simply type an enter

sudo /home/your_username/bin/bravedeb.sh and away you go.

i’ll stop here for now, so the op can do so if he wishes, and be back with stage 2 (thankfully short, lol) in 24.

wizard
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

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stage 2 (thankfully short, lol) in 24.
Thank you Chris appreciated
I did as you suggested and down load it as per these screenshots and after doing all that still no Brave Browser but I decided to look in the Synaptic Package Manager and after a little search found The Brave Browser package and installed it from there.
I have copied your rather long post and created a document so that I can read and comprehend the instructions at my own pace offline.

5699



5700
 

wizardfromoz

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g'day davy

and after a little search found The Brave Browser package and installed it from there.
that's good news :)

with your 2nd screenshot, after running the line starting with

echo

you failed to run the command

sudo apt update

before running the command

sudo apt install brave-browser

that is why it did not work.

cheers

wiz
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

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lekkerlinux

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I use Firefox and Firefox ESR because both come with the Linux Distros I use and I hate Google Chrome and ain't to fond of Chromium either.
While I'm waiting for Firefox to update to the latest version on Fedora, I'm using Chrome, because the Chromium version in Fedora software center is outdated.

Chrome is faster on Fedora, but I like the reading mode in Firefox, as well as the privacy tracking protection.

In Chrome I have to disable java script to block ads, but it takes away other stuff too and I then use Adguard to get rid of the ads, of things I can't afford anyway.

I have looked everywhere for how to block auto play video's in Chrome, but have found no easy solution. Any ideas?
 


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