Just a sleepy question.

noelw

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Evening all. I want to know thoughts on putting you pc to sleep. No not with a brick. Rather than sleep/hibernate I thought I would shut my monitor off. Or indeed would it be better just to shut the whole thing down. Currently mine is on in the morning and off at night. What do you do with yours. Thanks.
 


@noelw :-

Suspend is the usual mode of operation for me.

I'll often stick with one particular occupant of the "kennels" for several days, suspending overnight & shutting the monitor off. I'll eventually feel like a change, and will switch to another Puppy.

In my case, it makes very little difference, since all my Pups are set-up to be able to 'share' many of the same 'portable' applications, and all have access to the same common data folders anyway.

Might not suit everybody, but.....it works for me.


Mike. ;)
 
I disable sleep and let them have 5 hrs rest
 
When I leave home I hold the power button for 3 seconds and it goes to sleep, at night I shut it down completely. Very rarely it fails to return from sleep and it is probably a problem of the devices I have plugged in it, once or two times per year Debian 11 fails to return from sleep and require a hard reset
 
I just use the sleep / standby mode 24-7 and I'll reboot my computers every so often or after an update (old habit from Windows days).
 
I tend to leave things running with the monitor blanking after 15 minutes of inactivity.
 
I always turn them off.
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It is best to understand the 2 modes...
sleep put the computer into a low power mode but DOES NOT SHUT DOWN POWER. that means it will drain your battery.
hibernate WILL SHUT DOWN THE POWER and save the computer in the state you left off on. This will NOT drain battery.

so make your choice according to what you need. I personally just shut down when I do not need it and boot up is 30 seconds or less so I can wait.
 
There are a couple of things you can do. You can suspend to RAM or suspend to disk. If you suspend to RAM and lose power it's gone. I use a desktop and a UPS so I leave my Linux box on all the time. 36 days of uptime and counting. I've noticed that rebooting about once a month seems to help with stability. I'm using Debian Linux 11.7. I tried upgrading to Debian 12 which didn't work. The upgrade process broke and I had to restore everything from a backup. I plan to buy a couple of new hard drives, if I can ever afford to, so I can switch to Kali Linux anyway since Debian can be so buggy. I'm hoping Kali Linux will have more quality and better security since it is overseen by security experts.

What's more is that my Linux box runs a server and acts as a wifi router to connect two local networks so it needs to be available all the time.

Signed,

Matthew Campbell
 
It is inconvenient to boot up a machine, every time you need to look something up or do some other work.

I let the system run 24/7. When I am done working, I simply power off the monitor.
 
I use hybrid suspend. All by default goes to RAM suspend when closing lid and if battery is low data are saved to the disk.
 
It is best to understand the 2 modes...
sleep put the computer into a low power mode but DOES NOT SHUT DOWN POWER. that means it will drain your battery.
hibernate WILL SHUT DOWN THE POWER and save the computer in the state you left off on. This will NOT drain battery.

so make your choice according to what you need. I personally just shut down when I do not need it and boot up is 30 seconds or less so I can wait.

Yes, but the question doesn't necessarily involve batteries. Actually, still a lot of (Linux) machines are just desktop boxes of some kind. So, no batteries, no draining of batteries.
But instead one mode that uses some energy, but is faster to start up.
And, another method which uses no energy, but it is bit slower to startup.
Right ?
 
It is inconvenient to boot up a machine, every time you need to look something up or do some other work.

I let the system run 24/7. When I am done working, I simply power off the monitor.

Yes, but consider your 1200 Watt power brick, and the actual cost of power.
Around the world, these prices vary a lot.
In Europe, power is relatively expensive.

I thought Linux machines did start up quickly, no ?
If my Windows takes 2 minutes to start, that would be slow. Correct ?
But, that is how I work, when done I just shut down. I can start my machines many times per day, it depends.
When I work, that is something else.

Actually shutting down now, just this post complete, and be back in an hour, 2 hours, whatever.
 
Yes, but consider your 1200 Watt power brick, and the actual cost of power.
Around the world, these prices vary a lot.
In Europe, power is relatively expensive.

I thought Linux machines did start up quickly, no ?
If my Windows takes 2 minutes to start, that would be slow. Correct ?
But, that is how I work, when done I just shut down. I can start my machines many times per day, it depends.
When I work, that is something else.

Actually shutting down now, just this post complete, and be back in an hour, 2 hours, whatever.
Just because the power supply is capable of delivering 1200 watts to the computer doesn't necessarily mean the computer is using 1200 watts all the time.

Signed,

Matthew Campbell
 
Just because the power supply is capable of delivering 1200 watts to the computer doesn't necessarily mean the computer is using 1200 watts all the time.

Signed,

Matthew Campbell

Yes, that is absolutely correct but it is about the concept : there are people running computers with 2000 Watt power supply for 24/7 and think that there's no consumption because "I'm not using my browser"
 

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