kinetic Release no longer has a Release file

datdo27120003

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i want to update from 22.10 to 23.04 but when i use sudo apt update it like that :
1696151977808.png
 


Brickwizard

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arochester

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I am not directly answering your question, but Ubuntu 22.10 reached the end of its life July 20th 2023.

23.04 will reach the end of its life January 2024 - so you will only have a few months left of it.

They are both "Standard" versions

Unless you have a need of "shiny new things" you would be better to use LTS (Long Term Support) versions. They have a much longer life, and you can update from one LTS to another. Currently, 22.04 LTS will reach the end of its life April 2032
 
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datdo27120003

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I am not directly answering your question, but Ubuntu 22.10 reached the end of its life July 20th 2023.

23.04 will reach the end of its life January 2024 - so you will only have a few months left of it.

They are both "Standard" versions

Unless you have a need of "shiny new things" you would be better to use LTS (Long Term Support) versions. They have a much longer life, and you can update from one LTS to another. Currently, 22.04 LTS will reach the end of its life April 2032
so only way is reinstall right ?
 

guiverc

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I'll provide some links.

Ubuntu 22.10 is EOL, with warning notices going out ~6 weeks before the EOL, and then on EOL, such as https://fridge.ubuntu.com/2023/07/27/ubuntu-22-10-kinetic-kudu-end-of-life-reached-on-july-20-2023/

I didn't see mention if the 22.10 or kinetic system was a Server or Desktop (this can matter!) so I'll provide a link that was included in the past link anyway which deals with upgrades - https://help.ubuntu.com/community/LunarUpgrades

If you didn't release-upgrade in time, there is an extra step involved which maybe required documented on this link - https://help.ubuntu.com/community/EOLUpgrades


The EOLUpgrades will tell you how to ensure all packages are updated, but also note all mirrors are free to DROP support for an EOL release anytime AFTER EOL, so you may need to change from a mirror, to the main archive as well.

I'd just attempt the release-upgrade anyway; as it will often work as long as your packages were kept up to date (though if certain packages are outdated, it'll require those to be updated before the release-upgrade as covered in the EOLUpgrades link I provided).

fyi: this detail is generic, as I don't know if server/desktop, but the links cover both.
 

guiverc

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when i use ppa to remove unoffical kinetic it still E: release no longer has a release file

Sorry I didn't see this question until after my prior post.

If using a desktop install; you can disable the source using the Software Sources app, if using a server you can disable it via an editor. By putting a "#" at the start of the line, it'll become disabled.

( Myself I use a text editor (vim) on any system, as I like leaving a note/comment explaining why any change is made, as many of my own systems survive for years. and I find it hard to recall what I did something 7 years & 5 months ago for example; though company policy can mandate this & other things anyway )

Ubuntu doco on repositories can be read at https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Repositories/Ubuntu

If it's a desktop system, you can non-destructively re-install; I have a kinetic (22.10) system that I re-installed on this box (I already had a lunar or 23.04 system, thus it became mantic or 23.10) though I really did it for QA or Quality Assurance purposes.. ie. to confirm I can perform the re-install of the currently un-released system, and none of my files got lost, my manually-installed apps got auto-reinstalled etc... I repeat that install weekly until we actually release too. This would be different if it was a server install though.
 

MikeWalsh

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I would tend to agree with many of the above comments. Ubuntu's release cycle, in particular, is an odd one. They release a new build every 6 months, with the ratio being 3:1.......3 "9-month wonders" (short-term support builds), followed by one that has up to 10 years support (Long Term Support build).

The "9-month wonders" are all essentially 'preview' builds for what will be incorporated into the next bi-annual LTS build.....so in all honesty, you're better off going with the LTS releases. Everything is more stable with these, everything is supported for FAR longer (the previous 5-year support window was extended out to 10 years not that long ago), and the other advantage is that supported software will be available for far longer.

Anybody that knows what they're doing will always advise the same; unless you really MUST have the very newest, 'bleeding-edge' versions of everything, all the time, stick with the LTS builds. They make for a far more predictable, easy-to-use experience.

I haven't used Ubuntu for several years, but having tried the 'upgrade' mechanism on one memorable occasion - and had the whole process devolve into a total shambles - I would always advise doing complete fresh installs. Far less hassle.

Just my two-penn'orth, FWIW.


Mike. ;)
 

guiverc

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I would tend to agree with many of the above comments. Ubuntu's release cycle, in particular, is an odd one.

Just an FYI, but Ubuntu's release cycle is what is based on the GNOME Project's expected releases; ie. the recent GNOME 45 release (https://release.gnome.org/45/) will appear in Ubuntu 23.10. April and October being with rare exceptions, not long after the GNOME releases are expected. That's the reason for the chosen months (a decision made back in 2004, that still mostly applies today).

The LTS development cycle is two years, with the work being done scheduled over 3 development cycles (the progress being shown in 22.10, 23.04 & 23.10 for the current 24.04 LTS release), and given CUPS as a snap packages was wanted for 24.04 but missed 23.10; it's been pushed to next cycle (now expected at 24.10 and will be in 26.04 LTS). (If not obvious, all new features outside of kernel/GNOME from upstream, are tried in at least one non-LTS before the final LTS; cups as snap package missed 23.10 or the last to be in 24.04)
 

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