LENOVO Winbook 100e running windows 10,

OP
karimfc

karimfc

Active Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2021
Messages
119
Reaction score
123
Credits
853
Nicely put by the cranky short-arsed green-skinned gentleman above ;)

That's good with your finding Etcher, another Stan and I learnt of it a couple of years ago and spread the word here as for it being a pretty reliable and versatile idiot-proof means of burning isos. So that answers a couple of questions I might otherwise have asked.

You've still to answer a couple of questions I had in earlier Posts, and I have another 2 before signing off and I will be back on deck earlier tomorrow.

1. Is there an OS on the Lenovo at the moment, and if so, which and which version?
2. If there is another computer in the house, what is it running and which version?

Also, at that time, good news and bad news on the Nitrux, I took the Live version for a spin today, and I'll brief you on that next.

Cheers

Wiz
Lenovo has windows 10 on it. So does the ancient Dell desktop. The desktop used to have Linux Mint Cinnamon on it, before my husband crashed it and then wiped the hard drive. I also have an even more ancient Dell laptop, but it's so incredibly slow it makes me mad when I try to use it. Not sure why it's like that either. There is windows 10 on it, but nothing else and it has a 168GB hard drive that I put in it a year or so ago. It worked fine, but then I let a friend use it, and voila, slower than my grandma on her birthday. I'm tempted to just wipe the desktop of windows and install a Linux distro on it. Im the only person that uses any of them anyway.
Earlier, while I was "doing some homework" I was messing around with the USB that I have nitrux on, and I put it in the ancient Dell laptop, and it showed a message. Screenshot to follow.... should I erase the USB, reformat it, and get a different iso, or just throw it all away and forget about learning this stuff? Lol, frustration has been my best friend today.
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20210315-040743_Video Player.jpg
    Screenshot_20210315-040743_Video Player.jpg
    248.8 KB · Views: 169


stan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2018
Messages
1,004
Reaction score
1,134
Credits
9,370
That's good with your finding Etcher, another Stan and I learnt of it a couple of years ago and spread the word here as for it being a pretty reliable and versatile idiot-proof means of burning isos.
I would add that it will be good if you use Etcher exclusively when you burn .iso files to the USB.... and then use Etcher again to re-use the same USB to work with new .iso files. It seems that switching from one program to another program can cause problems... sometimes actually killing the USB.

I just killed a USB drive the other day, so this is kind of fresh in my mind. It is often not just a simple process of plugging in the USB (like in Windows) and telling it to format it. If a USB gets hosed up, it can usually be recovered, but it can be kind of a convoluted ugly process. Better to save that lesson for you for another time. :)

USB flash drives are cheap (small sizes, 8 GB -- 64 GB)... shop for some deals and buy some spares. Keep some set aside to use for storage and separate from your Linux test drives.
 

stan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2018
Messages
1,004
Reaction score
1,134
Credits
9,370
Earlier, while I was "doing some homework" I was messing around with the USB that I have nitrux on, and I put it in the ancient Dell laptop, and it showed a message. Screenshot to follow.... should I erase the USB, reformat it, and get a different iso, or just throw it all away and forget about learning this stuff?
As I was saying above, don't reformat your Linux USB drives, if you can help it. Your old Dell may work fine for Linux... but your screenshot shows an issue that is very common. You booted on the Linux USB from a "cold start".... that is, the computer was completely powered down. Except that it wasn't. Windows 10 does not "power down" when you tell it to.... it goes into "hibernation"... meaning that it is still actually running. This is at least part of the problem you experienced, but there could be more to it than that.

Try this instead: Boot fully into Windows 10. Then, plug in your Linux USB, and tell Windows to "restart" (and not to "shut down"). When Windows restarts, it does not go into hibernation, so this is a quick test. Of course, you have to be quick when the computer begins to boot up... hitting the appropriate F-key (or ESC, or whatever is needed) in order to get to the BIOS "Boot Menu." I guess that you have got to this point already though. With luck, when you choose the Linux USB to boot, it may come to life.

This would be a great computer to blow away Windows 10 and install Linux on bare metal, if you are so inclined. I don't think you said how much RAM it has, so that is a factor as to how well Linux will run, but it should definitely be better than the slowness you have now with it.
 
OP
karimfc

karimfc

Active Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2021
Messages
119
Reaction score
123
Credits
853
I would add that it will be good if you use Etcher exclusively when you burn .iso files to the USB.... and then use Etcher again to re-use the same USB to work with new .iso files. It seems that switching from one program to another program can cause problems... sometimes actually killing the USB.

I just killed a USB drive the other day, so this is kind of fresh in my mind. It is often not just a simple process of plugging in the USB (like in Windows) and telling it to format it. If a USB gets hosed up, it can usually be recovered, but it can be kind of a convoluted ugly process. Better to save that lesson for you for another time. :)

USB flash drives are cheap (small sizes, 8 GB -- 64 GB)... shop for some deals and buy some spares. Keep some set aside to use for storage and separate from your Linux test drives.
I already have around 15 of them ranging from 8GB to 32GB and nothing of importance is on any of them, lol. Idk if that is a shame or shameful, lmao. Anywho, Etcher was SUPER easy to use. I have used Rufus in the past, but it seems like it was way more involved. Ok, so I have a wee lil bit of spare time on my hands rn, so I think I'm gonna try to install SOMETHING on my dell laptop. Wish me luck...
 

stan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2018
Messages
1,004
Reaction score
1,134
Credits
9,370
Good luck! :)

I will mention one downside to Etcher... you can't use "persistence" with it. But if you are ready to install on the Dell, just go for full installations instead. You will be happier with the results, I think. :)
 
OP
karimfc

karimfc

Active Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2021
Messages
119
Reaction score
123
Credits
853
As I was saying above, don't reformat your Linux USB drives, if you can help it. Your old Dell may work fine for Linux... but your screenshot shows an issue that is very common. You booted on the Linux USB from a "cold start".... that is, the computer was completely powered down. Except that it wasn't. Windows 10 does not "power down" when you tell it to.... it goes into "hibernation"... meaning that it is still actually running. This is at least part of the problem you experienced, but there could be more to it than that.

Try this instead: Boot fully into Windows 10. Then, plug in your Linux USB, and tell Windows to "restart" (and not to "shut down"). When Windows restarts, it does not go into hibernation, so this is a quick test. Of course, you have to be quick when the computer begins to boot up... hitting the appropriate F-key (or ESC, or whatever is needed) in order to get to the BIOS "Boot Menu." I guess that you have got to this point already though. With luck, when you choose the Linux USB to boot, it may come to life.

This would be a great computer to blow away Windows 10 and install Linux on bare metal, if you are so inclined. I don't think you said how much RAM it has, so that is a factor as to how well Linux will run, but it should definitely be better than the slowness you have now with it.
I'm not exactly sure how much it has, but I will check. Can you steer me in the direction of how to remove all OS from a dell laptop? any link will be just fine, if it's not too much to ask
 

stan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2018
Messages
1,004
Reaction score
1,134
Credits
9,370
I'm not exactly sure how much it has, but I will check. Can you steer me in the direction of how to remove all OS from a dell laptop? any link will be just fine, if it's not too much to ask
Sorry for delay... wife called me to breakfast. I never turn down food. Or beer! :)

No need to "erase" Windows first, although you can. If you can successfully boot on any Linux USB, when you tell it to install, choose "Use entire disk" when you get to that stage. There are only a small handful of "stages" that you need to answer questions... starting with your language and your keyboard. "Use entire disk" is in the middle, choose your Time Zone, and it will finish by asking you to create a user name (all lower case), your full name (doesn't need to be full name, or real name), your computer name (will probably show a long default name... change it to something short, like "dell" without the quotes), and your password. The order may vary from my list. The last few items may be to use LVM (don't for now, maybe later), whether to encrypt home folder or entire disk (don't for now, maybe later)... and last is whether to "start automatically" or "log in automatically" (again, don't for now... better to require your username and password to log in for various reasons). After this last screen, it will start copying files from the USB and installing. When finished, it will prompt you to reboot and remove the USB. Don't remove the USB until it tells you.

All told, it typically only takes me about 20-30 minutes to fully install Linux, including erasing Windows if needed. It may take you a little longer... take your time and read the prompts at each stage carefully. Don't worry if you choose a setting that you think should be different.... some can be changed after the install, but remember how easy the installation is and there is no fear of starting over and doing it again. The experience is good for you. :)
 
OP
karimfc

karimfc

Active Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2021
Messages
119
Reaction score
123
Credits
853
Sorry for delay... wife called me to breakfast. I never turn down food. Or beer! :)

No need to "erase" Windows first, although you can. If you can successfully boot on any Linux USB, when you tell it to install, choose "Use entire disk" when you get to that stage. There are only a small handful of "stages" that you need to answer questions... starting with your language and your keyboard. "Use entire disk" is in the middle, choose your Time Zone, and it will finish by asking you to create a user name (all lower case), your full name (doesn't need to be full name, or real name), your computer name (will probably show a long default name... change it to something short, like "dell" without the quotes), and your password. The order may vary from my list. The last few items may be to use LVM (don't for now, maybe later), whether to encrypt home folder or entire disk (don't for now, maybe later)... and last is whether to "start automatically" or "log in automatically" (again, don't for now... better to require your username and password to log in for various reasons). After this last screen, it will start copying files from the USB and installing. When finished, it will prompt you to reboot and remove the USB. Don't remove the USB until it tells you.

All told, it typically only takes me about 20-30 minutes to fully install Linux, including erasing Windows if needed. It may take you a little longer... take your time and read the prompts at each stage carefully. Don't worry if you choose a setting that you think should be different.... some can be changed after the install, but remember how easy the installation is and there is no fear of starting over and doing it again. The experience is good for you. :)
Thanks man. I appreciate it. And my husband doesn't eat unless I'm the one making it. It's like he can't even make his own sandwich, cuz he loves everything I make. Lol.
 

wizardfromoz

Administrator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Joined
Apr 30, 2017
Messages
7,514
Reaction score
6,355
Credits
26,587
0cd7RxV.gif


(Wizard appears in a puff of smoke, trips over scattered USB sticks and sets fire to them, does a Mexican Hat Dance to extinguish them)

Morning all.

Which Distro first, Kari?

I would suggest Zorin for the first install.

Nitrux looks intersting, however it operates from the Zsh shell.

On Shells:

https://www.tecmint.com/different-types-of-linux-shells/

and

https://askubuntu.com/questions/506...tween-terminal-console-shell-and-command-line

The most commonly used shell in Linux, and subsequently supported by Members here, is the Bash shell (Bourne Again SHell),

Terminal (or a Terminal Emulator, under KDE known as Konsole) is the common way to issue the commands and get information through the shell. Under Windows you might know terms such as Command or cmd, or the DOS prompt, same sort of thing.

We can "get away" with just using the point and click stuff on our desktop (GUI - Graphical User Interface, pronounced "gooey") for the most part, but Terminal has to be used in certain areas, is more powerful and versatile, and if we are diagnosing your problems, we will often ask for information from Terminal, so it pays to get acquainted with it.

Under Bash on my Zorin 15, I can show you an example

Fx6zAuI.png


Here, I have issued 3 variations of the ls (list) command - similar to "dir" under Windows Command, to show contents of my present working folder/directory, which is /home/chris by default.

They are the standard folders and a file, visible if I showed the same in my File Manager.

The 2nd command

ls -a (all)

shows all folders and files, including those invisible by default.

The 3rd

ls -al

shows a part of the output from the 2nd command and with Ownership by User and Group, and Read, Write and Execute Permissions.

Where is this going?

Zorin uses the Bash, as does Ubuntu, Linux Mint and very many more.

Nitrux uses Zsh.

While very many of the commands are identical, some will differ in syntax and even by name, in how you use them.

I don't know Zsh well enough to even guess what those differences may be.

Some of our Members use Zsh, or have used Zsh and may be able to help when you need it, but support might be light on the ground, and influenced by timezones. You could face long waits.

If you have already installed Nitrux, so be it and I have my downloaded iso at my fingertips ready to install to help, but I might take some months to get up to speed with Zsh nuances.

An alternative if you have installed Nitrux already is that you can change the default shell to the Bash in an easy operation I can show you, and then it is easier to support you. Have a think about it.

I have to spend an hour cleaning up before the cleaning lady gets here from Bluecare (don't even ask, lol), when I am back I can cover some stuff about KDE.

Cheers

Wiz
 

stan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2018
Messages
1,004
Reaction score
1,134
Credits
9,370
I would suggest Zorin for the first install.
A quick comment about Zorin, if you choose that one. One of the early installation stages asks, "Participate in the Census?" It is a checkbox that is checked by default. The Census is a reporting system that collects information (anonymous, they say) and sends it back to the Zorin developers. Your choice on this, but I always choose to uncheck it to disable the Census.

Okay, carry on! :)
 
OP
karimfc

karimfc

Active Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2021
Messages
119
Reaction score
123
Credits
853
Well, I got distracted (my couch and furbaby were calling my name so loud I couldn't ignore them, lol), and took a nap, so no install as of yet. However, I did decide to just use my Dell laptop, since it really doesn't matter if it gets messed up (I used them Lenovo for class, etc.) And I have etcher flashing Zorin OS 15.3 as I speak. Will let u know how the install goes shortly. Right after dinner.
 
OP
karimfc

karimfc

Active Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2021
Messages
119
Reaction score
123
Credits
853
A quick comment about Zorin, if you choose that one. One of the early installation stages asks, "Participate in the Census?" It is a checkbox that is checked by default. The Census is a reporting system that collects information (anonymous, they say) and sends it back to the Zorin developers. Your choice on this, but I always choose to uncheck it to disable the Census.

Okay, carry on! :)
I don't know why, but when I saw that screen the other day, before I asked yall for help, I unchecked that option myself
 

wizardfromoz

Administrator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Joined
Apr 30, 2017
Messages
7,514
Reaction score
6,355
Credits
26,587
A couple of "Don't" 's - if the options present themselves

1. Don't choose to encrypt your Home folder/partition
2. Don't choose LVM (Logical Volume Management)

These are options better used, if at all, by Intermediate to Advanced users.

Many of us employ the KISS principle - Keep It Simple, Stupid.

Easier to install, easier to fix if needed.

Cheers
 
OP
karimfc

karimfc

Active Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2021
Messages
119
Reaction score
123
Credits
853
A couple of "Don't" 's - if the options present themselves

1. Don't choose to encrypt your Home folder/partition
2. Don't choose LVM (Logical Volume Management)

These are options better used, if at all, by Intermediate to Advanced users.

Many of us employ the KISS principle - Keep It Simple, Stupid.

Easier to install, easier to fix if needed.

Cheers

OK, so I have a good zorin OS iso, and I've tried to install it on my Dell Inspiron 1545; Intel Dual CPU T3400 @ 2.16Ghz, 2167Mhz, to no avail. I'm at my wits' end. I either keep getting the message in the screenshot, or it says "Failed to start show Plymouth Boot Screen" wtf that even means. I've tried different usb's with no change... help? please. I've entered bios and changed to boot order, and the bios is in Legacy mode; fast boot is not available, I believe, because it doesn't show up, secure boot is unsupported, PCK7 Config says "binding not possible". Oh, and it currently has WINDOWS 10Pro. What am I doing wrong/not doing? UGGHHH, frustration...
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20210315-040743_Video Player.jpg
    Screenshot_20210315-040743_Video Player.jpg
    248.8 KB · Views: 160

stan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2018
Messages
1,004
Reaction score
1,134
Credits
9,370
Did you begin by booting into WIndows 10 first, and then choosing "restart" as I described earlier? The screenshot showing "hibernation" suggests that you didn't. There are other ways, but "restarting" Windows is about the easiest.
 

stan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2018
Messages
1,004
Reaction score
1,134
Credits
9,370
I believe, because it doesn't show up, secure boot is unsupported,
I doubt that. It may have disappeared when you selected Legacy mode. Secure Boot requires UEFI mode. I think that Zorin will work with UEFI and Secure Boot, but leave in Legacy mode... it will be better if you experiment further with other distros.

PCK7 Config says "binding not possible".
What is PCK7? And where do you see that?

UGGHHH, frustration...
Take a deep breath, and don't let it bother you. The first time is always the hardest. This little snafu will be solved before long. :)
 
Last edited:
OP
karimfc

karimfc

Active Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2021
Messages
119
Reaction score
123
Credits
853
I doubt that. It may have disappeared when you selected Legacy mode. Secure Boot requires UEFI mode. I think that Zorin will work with UEFI and Secure Boot, but leave in Legacy mode... it will be better if you experiment further with other distros.


What is PCK7? And where do you see that?


Take a deep breath, and don't let it bother you. The first time is always the hardest. This little snafu will be solved before long. :)
That was the only "FAILED..." After the attempted install
 

stan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2018
Messages
1,004
Reaction score
1,134
Credits
9,370
Hmmm, was that PCR7 instead? Or an easier question may be, Do you have Windows encrypted with Bit Locker?
 
OP
karimfc

karimfc

Active Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2021
Messages
119
Reaction score
123
Credits
853
I hope this isn't oversharing, but idk what to do, (sigh)
 

Attachments

  • 20210315_214757.jpg
    20210315_214757.jpg
    12.3 MB · Views: 166
  • 20210315_215154.jpg
    20210315_215154.jpg
    10.5 MB · Views: 165
  • 20210315_215033.jpg
    20210315_215033.jpg
    9.6 MB · Views: 183
  • 20210315_214912.jpg
    20210315_214912.jpg
    11.2 MB · Views: 173
  • 20210315_214817.jpg
    20210315_214817.jpg
    10.5 MB · Views: 165
  • 20210315_214757.jpg
    20210315_214757.jpg
    12.3 MB · Views: 170
  • 20210315_214606.jpg
    20210315_214606.jpg
    10.2 MB · Views: 164
  • 20210315_214624.jpg
    20210315_214624.jpg
    11.6 MB · Views: 171
OP
karimfc

karimfc

Active Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2021
Messages
119
Reaction score
123
Credits
853
Hmmm, was that PCR7 instead? Or an easier question may be, Do you have Windows encrypted with Bit Locker?
Yes, my mistake. You are correct. And idk if it's encrypted, but Bit Locker is on my windows...
 
$100 Digital Ocean Credit
Get a free VM to test out Linux!

Linux.org Hosting Donations
Consider making a donation

Members online


Top