LMDE 6 vs Debian - what are the differences?

onguys

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This may be a dumb question, if so please forgive my nubie ignorance, I really want to know or I would not post this.
The first distribution that I have ever gotten to work for me is LMDE 6 Faye, I saw the word Debian in the install somewhere.
I just read the thread https://www.linux.org/threads/installing-debian.4118/ but the symbols look different which makes me wonder; is there a difference? Or is LMDE 6 Debian or are they each a different thing, distro of their own? I am literally learning as I go and have only replaced my Windows 11 OS a couple of weeks ago now though so far I am exceptionally happy with the switch. I only wish the Faye distro had been available when Windows first started giving me grief 2013 when I first had the itch to send it to file 13. :)
 


No worries at all! And it's perfectly okay to ask questions, especially when you're learning something new.

LMDE stands for "Linux Mint Debian Edition." Linux Mint is a popular Linux distribution, and LMDE is one of its editions. Linux Mint traditionally has been based on Ubuntu, another popular Linux distribution, but LMDE is based on Debian, which is another major Linux distribution. So when you see LMDE 6 Faye, it means it's the sixth release of LMDE, and "Faye" is the codename for that specific version.

Debian is the base distribution upon which LMDE is built. It's like the foundation on which LMDE adds its own features, software selection, and customizations. Think of it as a parent-child relationship, where Debian is the parent and LMDE is the child. Both Debian and LMDE share a lot of similarities, but LMDE may have its own unique features and characteristics.

So, in summary, LMDE 6 Faye is a version of Linux Mint that is based on Debian, which is a separate distribution in its own right. They are related but distinct from each other.
 
So, in summary, LMDE 6 Faye is a version of Linux Mint that is based on Debian
Just to add Mint main edition is based on Ubuntu, which is also based on Debian, Linux is an incestuous family in that nearly all distributions are based on another,what makes each different is the selection of apps and management programs chosen by the developers
 
Just to add Mint main edition is based on Ubuntu, which is also based on Debian, Linux is an incestuous family in that nearly all distributions are based on another,what makes each different is the selection of apps and management programs chosen by the developers

Arch, Fedora/RHEL, Debian to rule them all o_O:p
 
I have lmde6 on a thumb drive....i use it occasionally.

If ever ubuntu decide to play nasty with Linux Mint, i will switch immediately and completely to LMDE 6.

It is a solid, reliable OS......I have found no drawbacks with it.
 
I only wish the Faye distro had been available when Windows first started giving me grief 2013
Back in 2013 the original Mint LMDE was available but became depeated around 2015 [not enough interest at the time] mint Ubuntu based was on about version 15, mint 13 being the LTS version at that date. I first started playing with mint when i was given a beta trial CD of Mint 2 and became my main desktop at mint 5, and has been on one or other of my machines since then
 
Yep basically there are two main distributions that a lot of other distros are based on - Arch and Debian - and a few others like Slackware and Puppy in between

 
LMDE6 is based on Debian To which Mint dev's add there own Desktop and some tools. Debian is the base for many many distros over the years. Both Mint and Debian are good distros , Debian is a bit harder for most new users to work with but it's well worth the effort. Debian 12 the latest stable version is nice and offers stability for many years. LMDE is sort of a test by the Mint team in case Ubuntu ever does something they can't abide with. In any event Mint (LMDE) and Debian are both good solid distros. Enjoy the journey!
 
So Far, I’m much happier with the Linux OS vs Windows OS. I guess it is only to be expected that some operating systems handle things like metadata better than others. So far this appears to be the only area that Windows performs better than the Linux OS. As I understand it, Video Duration, 1080 dpi, date, file size or Image dimension information are considered metadata; but that 1 aspect does not assuage the years of frustration with Windows that inspired my jumping ship and going to Linux.

I am very grateful that Linux is able to help me recover files that were inaccessible thru my windows os in some of the first external hard drives I bought back at the turn of the millennium. I'm in the process of trying to go thru these drives to weed out duplications. I have been looking over extensions in both system and flatpack but so far only found things that can read it, but are not particularly helpful for opening or moving files between folders. I see in the posts this has been mentioned by a few others so I may have to just learn some programming and build my own duplicate identifying, metadata reading media file manager. But that is ok, it gives me something to focus my attempts at learning Linux towards. :)
 
but are not particularly helpful for opening or moving files between folders.
have you tried drag and drop to the desktop then on to wherever you want them or direct to another folder
 
have you tried drag and drop to the desktop then on to wherever you want them or direct to another folder

I too am a bit confused here. Pretty much every GUI based file manager I've ever used has traditional drag and drop just as windows did. Thunar and Dolphin being my preferences depending on environment, Ranger for CLI
 
My first two text reference materials arrived in today's mail, looking forward to reading thru them.
Linux (Quick Study Computer) Pamphlet – March 29, 2000
ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1572224483
Linux for Absolute Beginners: An Introduction to the Linux Operating System, Including Commands, Editors, and Shell Programming Paperback – June 21, 2021 ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 979-8524534439
From the online articles it seems that C++ and Python are two popular programming languages with Linux, so I think my next book purchases will be something on those subjects. If you were going to build your own media file management application, which programming language would you use?
 
I too am a bit confused here. Pretty much every GUI based file manager I've ever used has traditional drag and drop just as windows did. Thunar and Dolphin being my preferences depending on environment, Ranger for CLI
Thank You, The Dolphin File Manager is more akin to what I am looking for. I can definitely use that in sorting the duplication in my photos and documents with this. I'll read the user guides on this to see if I can get the video to show duration like the audio file option indicates.
 

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Thank You, The Dolphin File Manager is more akin to what I am looking for. I can definitely use that in sorting the duplication in my photos and documents with this. I'll read the user guides on this to see if I can get the video to show duration like the audio file option indicates.

If you haven't already looked into the KDE Desktop environment I might encourage you to do so. Dolphin is the default package manager in KDE Plasma and the entire system works well together. You might enjoy it's functionalities.

Personally I use a wm but if I ever opt for a change of pace and functionality, I go straight to KDE Plasma. Some of the stuff people come up with is truly incredible and KDE showcases it very well.
 
If you haven't already looked into the KDE Desktop environment I might encourage you to do so. Dolphin is the default package manager in KDE Plasma and the entire system works well together. You might enjoy it's functionalities.

Personally I use a wm but if I ever opt for a change of pace and functionality, I go straight to KDE Plasma. Some of the stuff people come up with is truly incredible and KDE showcases it very well.
Thank You, Will Do! I am able to cut and paste into folders having to open the video files in VLC Player for the duration info, but at least I can get things into time based folders and sort duplicates out that way now. :)
 

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