M5A78L-M-USB3 Linux drivers anyone

Pablo56

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I want to set up a PC as a Linux/Debian PC. The sticking point is when it checks for updates. This needs the internet and the lan drivers. With this motherboard you have to install these from a DVD. The only drivers on the DVD are for Microsoft.

Aditional
the motherboard is over 5 years old now. I don't know the release date of the motherboard but I have downloaded Debian-10.4.0-amd64-DVD-1.iso [Release date 6 July 2019] which is newer than the motherboard. Is there anyway I can find the information you ask? Maybe through the splash screen or the bios boot menu?

I tried this last year and it got stuck at the point where it was looking for updates. I think it was having dificulty connecting to the internet. I have used the drivers that came on the DVD Realtek_LanXPVistaWin7_VER5792_VER6250_VER752 which works on windows 7.

currently I have 2 500g SSD's one is blank so that I can install. I also have a creative labs audigy and a Nvida gforce card GT730 Driver is 355.82

Entering bios setup states version 2101

I do have PC experience in repairs building and installing windows but never used Linux/Debian
TIA

Pablo
 


Pablo56

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Where is my post first time here. I posted and got

Hello and welcome to Linux.org!

We're seeing a lot of questions posted via PM and/or personal profile pages. If you are looking to post a question, please post on the forum itself. You can always post in the Getting Started section if you aren't sure where to post.

Thanks! You can dismiss this notice..

My post didn't turn up in general so it was re-posted in getting started.
 
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jglen490

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With Linux, most of what is needed WRT drivers, etc., are installed from the ISO installer once it is burned to some media - mostly USB thumb drive. If you are currently using a PC/laptop with some Windows version, there are tools available that will reliably burn that ISO image to a thumb drive. One fo the most recommended tools is Rufus.

Oncew the ISO is burned (NOT copied), then connect that thumb drive to the PC/laptop that you want to use with Linux and boot the PC/laptop such that the thumb drive is the first boot device. There is an install program that will walk you through the setup and install process.

Unlike the Windows OS where drivers are mostly not a problem, with Linux if a manufacturer of some hardware does not write a Linux-specific driver or provide info, then a developer must figure out how to do that. Some manufacturers are more Linux-friendly than others

If you find you are having specific problems, you're at the right place for solutions!
 

Pablo56

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Hi jglen490. I am PC literate and can burn the iso images. Will have a go today and any problem will get back to you. This means switching PC on and off and flipping SSDs over and over.
 

captain-sensible

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With Linux, most of what is needed WRT drivers, etc., are installed from the ISO installer once it is burned to some media - mostly USB thumb drive. If you are currently using a PC/laptop with some Windows version, there are tools available that will reliably burn that ISO image to a thumb drive. One fo the most recommended tools is Rufus.

Oncew the ISO is burned (NOT copied), then connect that thumb drive to the PC/laptop that you want to use with Linux and boot the PC/laptop such that the thumb drive is the first boot device. There is an install program that will walk you through the setup and install process.

Unlike the Windows OS where drivers are mostly not a problem, with Linux if a manufacturer of some hardware does not write a Linux-specific driver or provide info, then a developer must figure out how to do that. Some manufacturers are more Linux-friendly than others

If you find you are having specific problems, you're at the right place for solutions!
ventoy , the way it works is that once usb is formatted all you have to do is just copy over, as in drag and drop to visible , when mounted , partition of usb :https://ventoy.net/en/index.html

it will involve some down loading , unziping and running an .exe if you use it via windows; i can't say if that is going to be easier or harder than just using rufus etc.
 

Pablo56

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Hi I have tried to install debian. First I found out that you HAVE to have a password * 2. Then I am asked to partition but that was a problem ended up using the defaults. (The SSD had 3 MS partitions NTFS already), I am asked to scan the other DVDs but the DVD tray opens and quickly closes not giving me time to replace. Eventually I had to forcibly hold it open to replace. Not shure why this was needed.

I was never asked to insert DVD2 or DVD3. Told to remove the DVD and re-boot. I got a blank monitor with a flashing cursor in top left. Clearly not working.

I have taken pics and placed on website There are 12 from

http://www.desmond-otoole.co.uk/debian/01.jpg through to
http://www.desmond-otoole.co.uk/debian/12.jpg

Any suggestions where I went wrong?

Had a look at installation info on website

4. Set up boot media such as CDs/DVDs/USB sticks or provide a network boot infrastructure from which the installer can be booted.

The hard disk is the boot media. Does this not mean the instalation media
 
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gvisoc

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In case of Debian it is recommended to start with the non-free image just in case the network needs a proprietary firmware or module, as well as the graphics card. Most of the times, downloading the non-free ISO is all what you need (it comes in a live format too, to try before install and check that it will actually work)
 

arochester

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I got a blank monitor with a flashing cursor in top left. Clearly not working.
This is normally an indication of a graphics issue. Are you using graphics direct from the motherboard or do you have a separate video card?

Only DVD #1 is bootable. The other DVDs are Repositories of other programs. They go out of date. They include lots of stuff you do not need. If you have a reasonable Internet connection you do not need them.

I am not sure about overcoming the graphics problem. It used to be possible to use https://journalxtra.com/linux/deskt...ive-guide-to-getting-your-linux-desktop-back/ . Scroll down to SOLUTION FIVE: RECONFIGURE THE DISPLAY MANAGER. ....But I don't know if this has been replaced by a systemd fix. Perhaps someone else can let us know....
 

Pablo56

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arochester

This might be it. There was a first menu option for graphics but I went for the 2nd option install.

Currently I have a creative labs audigy and an Nvida gforce card GT730 Driver is 355.82. THE DVD does not have Linux folders on it.

Just found this on Nvida website
NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-340.17.run

Can I salvage this without re-installing linux? I take it all I would need to do is put the file on a memory stick and point the instalation software at it, and that the file extension .run is a normal extension for Linux.

BUT WHY did it not ask for DVD2 and DVD3?
 
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Pablo56

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Hi. I could still do with some help on this. I installed Debian and I got a blank screen with a flashing cursor.

arochester said This is normally an indication of a graphics issue. Are you using graphics direct from the motherboard or do you have a separate video card?

I am using an Nvida gforce card GT730. I did find a Linux driver for this NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-340.17.run

Do I have to format and re-install again Or can I salvage this.

How do I get the driver in if I have to start all over again.

I know PCs and windows. I have a good grounding in computer hardware and software but nothing in Linux.
 

gvisoc

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You would need to download that file, check the signatures and give it execution permissions with
Bash:
chmod +x NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-340.17.run
Once done that, run the file as root with the following
Bash:
./NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-340.17.run
  • If your system doesn't have enabled Secure Boot, all should be fine; otherwise you would need to sign some modules and that may complicate a bit the thing in terms of having to do some extra steps; keep us posted.
  • It could ask you to install the linux headers package; in that case run the following as root and retry:
Bash:
apt -y install linux-headers-amd64
 

Pablo56

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How do I
1) Check the signature
2) run the file as root with the following NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-340.17.run
?) If your system doesn't have enabled Secure Boot

If you read my original thread. I you would know.

I Switch on my computer with a formatted SSD.
I put a Linux dvd in the computer and rin it.

How the bloody hell do you expect me to Check the signature, run the file as root with the following NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-340.17.run and check if my system has enabled Secure Boot?

I did say that I found a Linux NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-340.17.run for the Graphics card that I could put on a memory stick.

It is a single stand alone computer for gods sake. I do know something about computers.

How could I
apt -y install linux-headers-amd64
on a brand new computer that is a stand alone and is installing Linux?????????????//
?????????????
 

gvisoc

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Because you said you were proficient in Windows and computers. Checking the signatures is something common for all the platforms that you make to make sure that you downloaded a legit package and not a dodgy one. It’s done with the “sha256sum” command or some of their friends, depending on the signature algorithm.

Also, you said that Debian was installed, but the screen was blank and with a cursor blinking. And that is what it’s told by your pictures.
  1. To check whether your system has secure boot enabled, go to the BIOS/EFI
  2. To run those commands, press CTRL+ALT+F1 to go to a text terminal to make login as root
  3. Plug the USB drive and mount it (google has plenty of specific instructions and ‘mount’ has also manual pages: run ‘man mount’). Provided that it’s formatted in FAT32 and not NTFS, you should be able to copy your Nnvidia package to the root home folder.
  4. If this is not working for you, go back to my first response and:
    1. Prepare to start over
    2. From whatever computer you used to download all those DVD, download a live, non-free image. Check this: https://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/unofficial/non-free/cd-including-firmware/
    3. Use the live boot to test Debian in your hardware before installing, especially the graphics and the network.
 
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gvisoc

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Also, I want to put some stress in my main point here: Debian official images do not support proprietary hardware. They only work in canonically free hardware systems. In most of the cases it’s strongly recommended to download the non-free images. That solves 99.99% of the bad installations.

Another alternative is to download other Linux distributions, more friendly to old or proprietary hardware, to get a taste of the system and validate that it will work for you. Later on try Debian using the live images, and if they don’t work, again: fall back to the live-nonfree.
 

Pablo56

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If their is a problem with Debian, can you recommend some other Linux system please. At least that way we would be on the same page when their is a problem.

I didn't say I was proficient in windows but I know my way around things like control panel. go to the BIOS/EFI . I can go to bios in the splash screen in windows but I am in the middle of linux setup.
 
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