Mount problem

IT_Master

New Member
Credits
0
Hi,

I just started to learn Linux and I have a question:

This is my partitions info:
Code:
[email protected]:~$ lsblk -p
NAME        MAJ:MIN RM  SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
/dev/sdb      8:16   0    5G  0 disk
/dev/sr0     11:0    1 1024M  0 rom
/dev/sdc      8:32   1 14.5G  0 disk
└─/dev/sdc1   8:33   1 14.5G  0 part /media/amin/PATRIOT
/dev/sda      8:0    0   20G  0 disk
├─/dev/sda2   8:2    0    1K  0 part
├─/dev/sda5   8:5    0    4G  0 part [SWAP]
└─/dev/sda1   8:1    0   16G  0 part /
When I want to mount my additional HDD (/dev/sdb) I get this error:
Code:
[email protected]:~$ sudo mount /dev/sdb Desktop/sda
[sudo] password for amin:
mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/sdb,
       missing codepage or helper program, or other error
       In some cases useful info is found in syslog - try
       dmesg | tail or so.
Additional info: my Ubuntu is installed on WMware
 


Rob

Administrator
Staff member
Credits
19
Do you know what /dev/sdb is formated as? you will need to specify it if it's not picking it up.. you will also want to specify a partition to mount like:

mount -t vfat /dev/sdb1 /path/mountpoint

If it's a new, unformatted device, you can create a filesystem on it with:
mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdb1
 

atanere

Well-Known Member
Credits
0
I'm not sure how VMware or other virtual hosts would identify additional hard drives in the system. Please also show us the output from:
Code:
mount
Thanks
 

IT_Master

New Member
Credits
0
Do you know what /dev/sdb is formated as? you will need to specify it if it's not picking it up.. you will also want to specify a partition to mount like:

mount -t vfat /dev/sdb1 /path/mountpoint

If it's a new, unformatted device, you can create a filesystem on it with:
mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdb1
Thanks a lot.
Problem solved by formatting partition
 

IT_Master

New Member
Credits
0
I got another problem:

I added mount in "/etc/fstab":

Code:
# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a
# device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices
# that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
#
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
# / was on /dev/sda1 during installation
UUID=2cc32f7b-fdd8-4863-bed6-d7f42634d86b /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
# swap was on /dev/sda5 during installation
UUID=8373e739-a548-4a12-a405-4a7c3ed49528 none            swap    sw              0       0
/dev/fd0        /media/floppy0  auto    rw,user,noauto,exec,utf8 0       0
/dev/sdb /home/amin/desktop/sdb auto auto,user,rw 0  0
When I mount it now I get this error:
Code:
[email protected]:~$ sudo mount -a
mount: mount point /home/amin/desktop/sdb does not exist
While this address is already created: /home/amin/desktop/sdb

And this is my portion info:
Code:
[email protected]:~$ lsblk -p
NAME        MAJ:MIN RM  SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
/dev/sdb      8:16   0    5G  0 disk
/dev/sr0     11:0    1 1024M  0 rom 
/dev/sdc      8:32   1 14.5G  0 disk
└─/dev/sdc1   8:33   1 14.5G  0 part /media/amin/PATRIOT
/dev/sda      8:0    0   20G  0 disk
├─/dev/sda2   8:2    0    1K  0 part
├─/dev/sda5   8:5    0    4G  0 part [SWAP]
└─/dev/sda1   8:1    0   16G  0 part /
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
1,249
Hi Amin, I am only here briefly before I retire to other pursuits for the evening, I will take a closer look tomorrow my time.

But in the meantime, just revisiting @Rob 's advice at #2 above:

Did you actually generate a partition on the 5GB external drive, or just format it? The output of lsblk does not seem to indicate so.

Cheers

Wizard
 

MacgyverPT

Member
Credits
0
/dev/sdb is your drive, /dev/sdb1 is your partition, so you mount the partition, not the drive (I supose...). Check if your partition is unformatted (if not, follow the @Rob tip)
 

atanere

Well-Known Member
Credits
0
While this address is already created: /home/amin/desktop/sdb
Hi Amin, did you create a folder on your desktop named sdb? Or does the above appear there all by itself? Some distros will auto-mount hard drives and partitions, and I wonder if yours is doing that. Also Desktop is usually capitalized... so not sure why yours is not.

You said earlier, "Problem solved" after formatting the drive. So if your desktop shows a sdb drive, can you double-click on it and open it to see the contents? If its empty, it may say there are no files, but it should say that there is 5G of free space available.

Next question... 5G???? I am suddenly very confused that you have a drive that is so small. Is this a USB flash drive? Or a SD card, or microSD card? Please tell us more about it.

Your /etc/fstab entry for /dev/sdb is not correct, so you might as well delete it, or comment it out with the # character.

Cheers
 

IT_Master

New Member
Credits
0
/dev/sdb is your drive, /dev/sdb1 is your partition, so you mount the partition, not the drive (I supose...). Check if your partition is unformatted (if not, follow the @Rob tip)
Thanks, solved.

1) I created a partition on /dev/sdb => sdb1
2) Formatted sdb1
3) Mount it successfully!

Also, the most important problem was I used small letter in "desktop" instead of "Desktop":
/home/amin/Desktop/sdb
 
Last edited:

IT_Master

New Member
Credits
0
Hi Amin, did you create a folder on your desktop named sdb? Or does the above appear there all by itself? Some distros will auto-mount hard drives and partitions, and I wonder if yours is doing that. Also Desktop is usually capitalized... so not sure why yours is not.

You said earlier, "Problem solved" after formatting the drive. So if your desktop shows a sdb drive, can you double-click on it and open it to see the contents? If its empty, it may say there are no files, but it should say that there is 5G of free space available.

Next question... 5G???? I am suddenly very confused that you have a drive that is so small. Is this a USB flash drive? Or a SD card, or microSD card? Please tell us more about it.

Your /etc/fstab entry for /dev/sdb is not correct, so you might as well delete it, or comment it out with the # character.

Cheers
Hi,

Sorry for delay.
The problem was I wanted to mount on a disk, not partition.
About 5G: As you know I am learning Linux on VMware, this is only for my learning course, not actual. Root partition is 20Gb
 

MacgyverPT

Member
Credits
0
Thanks, solved.

1) I created a partition on /dev/sdb => sdb1
2) Formatted sdb1
3) Mount it successfully!

Also, the most important problem was I used small letter in "desktop" instead of "Desktop":
/home/amin/Desktop/sdb
Great!

Don't forget, Linux is case sensitive.
 


Members online


Top