Need a little guidance on VM Box

Nik-Ken-Bah

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Just getting started on using VM Box with Linux Mint 19.2 being the host m/c I believe its called ( correct me should I be in error in thinking that)
When I get to the create box I am unsure of which version of Linux to use it is either Debian, Ubuntu or straight out Linux. as per screen shot
1618487297390.png

The first two inputs I understand but not clear on the other two input lines
Type input line is where I run into the Linux question.
and I am not that certain about the Version input line.
The version line. Are they asking a question on the Kernel version that I am running?
TIA
 


Linuxembourg

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I might be misreading, but it seems you are trying to create a Windows 10 VM? If so, the settings look correct (if you are installing 32 bit windows). You only need to choose Linux in those settings if you are installing/booting a Linux distro up as a VM.

In my (very limited) experience, WMware player is better than VirtualBox in terms of integration.

Or if you are trying to install Linux Mint 19 into a virtual machine, then - https://linuxhint.com/install_linuxmint_19_virtualbox/
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

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Windows 10 VM?
Ah that is a negative on that, that screen shot came from the documentation PDF and when I input Linux as in this shot
1618489326030.png

But there are 22 different flavours versions I can choose from( haven't figure how to take a screen shot with an open selection up )
This may assist "
Desktop: Cinnamon 4.2.4 wm: muffin dm: LightDM Distro: Linux Mint 19.2 Tina
base: Ubuntu 18.04 bionic
There is the glow of the piccaninny dawn of understanding is beginning to glow and version means the Kernel version of the base kernel used for the distro?????????????
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

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You're trying to install a Mint VM?
Yes! If you mean setting it up to run on the Mint distro I am currently using.
So you are recommending to use the Ubuntu 64-bit as the version?
 

KGIII

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Alright, let's establish some knowns.

What operating system are you booted to - on bare metal? (This will be known as the host.)

What operating system are you trying to run in a VM? (This will be known as the guest.)
 

Tolkem

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When I get to the create box I am unsure of which version of Linux to use it is either Debian
Most times VBox will detect the correct Linux version, so you might leave that as is, unless you know for sure it's wrong.
Are they asking a question on the Kernel version that I am running?
No, VBox (as long as I remember) doesn't ask for kernel. I think you're good to go. In any case, worst case scenario you'll get an error and the VM won't work, so you just have to start over trying different options. The guess OS won't mess with the host OS, so you can safely try as many times as required. :)
 

Linuxembourg

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But there are 22 different flavours versions I can choose from( haven't figure how to take a screen shot with an open selection up )
KGIII has responded re Mint, but generally this is also something I struggle with. I always have to look up the settings if I install stuff like Slitaz or Puppy that isn't listed specifically as an option.
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

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What operating system are you booted to - on bare metal? (This will be known as the host.)
Bare metal host is Linux Mint.
I am trying to do the initial set up with the view to run Manjaro first to get the hang of what is required so that I can set a couple of others up so I can learn to tasks without effecting my main OS and also removing them to replace them with other distros so I can make a choice for my secondary and tertiary distros to have programs that I want to use from time without cluttering up or needing to remove programs to run a similar program. Like I cannot run Open Office alongside Libre office since they are apparently related.
Theoretically I can host using 5 gig of RAM to each guest, up to 5 distros leaving 5 to 6 gig for the host. (I have an occasion recently where Mint used 9 gig of ram out of 32 gig, )
Sorry if at times I seem a little muddle headed, I am trying to make head and tail of an abstraction and those trying to explain it tend to go into verbal diarrhea, well after all they are professors of Economy.

No, VBox (as long as I remember) doesn't ask for kernel
Thank you, that is one query answered.
And the water gets clearer.
 

KGIII

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Manjaro settings:

Selection_088.png


And VBox does ask for the kernel in some cases. If you just type in the distro name it is pretty good about picking the right settings. But, yes, you can select specific kernels in VBox.

desktop 1_089.png
 

Tolkem

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And VBox does ask for the kernel in some cases. If you just type in the distro name it is pretty good about picking the right settings. But, yes, you can select specific kernels in VBox.
This isn't quite right. VBox doesn't ask for "specific kernels" what you do is tell VBox whether the guest is a 32 or 64 system. I don't know if you meant it like this but selecting Arch 32, Mandriva 64, Red Hat 32 or any other doesn't mean you're telling VBox to use arch's kernel, or madriva's or red hat's, you're just telling VBox "hey, this is "distro name here" 32 or 64 bit guest", also, it helps you in identifying the VM. VBox installs a driver module called vboxdrv into the host's system kernel, without this kernel module, virtual machines will not start, so no, VBox doesn't ask for kernels, you're confusing the OS type with that. For example, in your screenshot Manjaro should be matched with Arch, not Mandriva since it is an Arch based distro. Check this article from Oracle, the people behind VBox, there's no mention of "selecting a kernel" anywhere:
 

Tolkem

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See the 2nd image. Top most part of it.
I did see that: Type: Linux and you get to tell the type of OS, yes, Linux 2.2 is the type of OS, not the kernel version to use. Just imagine how complex would that be; having VBox to use whatever kenel version the user wishes to use.
 

KGIII

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I did see that: Type: Linux and you get to tell the type of OS, yes, Linux 2.2 is the type of OS, not the kernel version to use. Just imagine how complex would that be; having VBox to use whatever kenel version the user wishes to use.
I think I see where the wires are crossed.

No, it won't magically make a virtualized OS use a specific kernel.

Yes, you can select which specific kernel version you want to have VBox settings for (for a limited subset of kernels). The Linux 2.2 is just a generic OS that uses the 2.2 kernel.

There is no 'type of OS' that is Linux 2.2. There were many versions of Linux that used the 2.2 kernel.
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

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Ah that is a negative on that, that screen shot came from the documentation PDF and when I input Linux as in this shot
View attachment 9063
But there are 22 different flavours versions I can choose from( haven't figure how to take a screen shot with an open selection up )
This may assist "
Desktop: Cinnamon 4.2.4 wm: muffin dm: LightDM Distro: Linux Mint 19.2 Tina
base: Ubuntu 18.04 bionic
There is the glow of the piccaninny dawn of understanding is beginning to glow and version means the Kernel version of the base kernel used for the distro?????????????
@KGIII @Tolkem
I finally figured it out o_O:D:D
When you put the name of the distro you want to use as the in the Name input line
what appears in the type is Linux and
what appears in the version is the the distro it is based on appears
Like I typed in Manjaro as the name
up popped Linux as the type
in the version line appeared Arch (64-bit) appeared which it is based on
did the same with MX and it came up as Debian (64-bit) as it did when I typed in Linux Mint Debian Ed. meaning the both of them are Debian based.
Though I did type in Salix but that did nothing meaning that you have to know the distro it is based and look for it in the drop down list and look for it.
 

Tolkem

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Though I did type in Salix but that did nothing meaning that you have to know the distro it is based and look for it in the drop down list and look for it.
When in doubt, just use Linux.
There is no 'type of OS' that is Linux 2.2. There were many versions of Linux that used the 2.2 kernel.
Yes, you're right, however, you may use Linux 2.2, 2.4, 3.0, etc, as the "type OS" in VBox for a VM running Android. Note that "Type OS" is just a naming thing and has nothing to do with kernels.
 

KGIII

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When you put the name of the distro you want to use as the in the Name input line
LOL

If you just type in the distro name it is pretty good about picking the right settings.
Sheesh! ;-)

Yeah, it picks the right settings pretty well. It's good about that. I assume it uses an internal database with fuzzy logic.
 

sam444

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Virtualbox is easy to use once you get the hang of it, Youtube has some good videos. :)

Virtualbox has some nice features...Import-Export Appliance...with this feature you can create a copy of your VM and store in on an External HDD, so you don't have to Re-Install to OS should you do a clean install.

With the Clone feature, you can create a Clone of of your VM and use it online especially if it's a windoze VM...any viruses, Spyware or Hackers are not a problem...just delete it and create another one, without harming your original VM. :)

I also have a Share Folder between my Linux Mint Desktop and my windoze 7 VM for file sharing and one more thing...if the Host is Linux don't forget to add yourself to the vbox user group so your Flash Drives or USB Printer will work. ;)
 
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