New to Linux



Condobloke

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LAUGH.gif
 

f33dm3bits

Gold Member
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How about by reading the stickied post in the section you posted in. There is no perfect way, there are many roads to Rome.
https://www.reddit.com/r/linux4noobs/comments/b796d4
 

brickwizard

Well-Known Member
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Welcome
all Journey's start with the first step,
Walk don't run
select and test before committing
No one is infallible, if in doubt recherche then ask
No question is stupid [if you don't know the answer]
finally please give details of your box [make model modifications] and you distribution [name, issue number, desktop] when asking for assistance


Linux is constantly evolving, we are all constantly learning
Take your time and enjoy

bwiz
 

Wixen

Member
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You tube is your friend, watch some distro reviews, see if anything takes your fancy. Don't just jump in blindly, do your research. I was looking at half a dozen distros and eventually plumped for linux lite because I'm essentially a less is more kind of person and I didn't need a flashy desktop or a ton of apps.
 

stan

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6,591
Please provide perfect path to begin
"Paths are many." ;)

There are almost 300 different Linux distributions currently. You need to try at least 3 or 4 to see what appeals to you, and to be sure that they recognize your computer's hardware correctly (sound, wireless, etc). By "try 3 or 4".... I mean that you should download the Linux .ISO file (the install file) and "burn it" properly to a USB flash drive. "Burning it" properly means that the flash drive will boot your computer so you can use it and try it. This will not harm or change your computer. You need a special program to "burn" the flash drive properly. Many here recommend Balena Etcher as one of the most simple for a new person to use. You should be sure that your computer meets the Linux "system requirements," especially how much RAM is needed for it to work properly. You should only download Linux .ISO files from their sources, for example:

Linux Lite
Linux Mint
Fedora (Other Fedora "spins")
Ubuntu Desktop (Other Ubuntu "flavors")

For even more choices, check out the DistroWatch website.

The Linux .ISO files are very large, often between 2GB - 4GB. If your internet connection is unreliable for large downloads, you should also learn how to "verify the checksum." This will confirm that your download is complete and not corrupted. If you use Windows, this article explains the process and includes a link to a very nice Windows programs that will do this task for you.

Good luck!
 

Condobloke

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