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PhilippinPete

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As a beginner with zero Linux experience, I am looking for advice on installing an OS like "Zorin" or "Mint" using Virtualbox. I'm using a two year old HP Pavilion laptop. My daily use consists of watching the news on YT and other video platforms, using messenger to communicate with friends, posting pics, listening to music, making a few personal videos to share with family and friends and some word processing. I was watching a Zorin tutorial on YT and I liked what I saw. Do you have any advice for running a Linux distribution, that is user friendly (for someone like me, who uses Windows) with Virtualbox, or can you guide me to a tutorial that will help me complete this process? I would like the option of being able to switch between operating systems and Virtualbox sounds like the answer. Again... thanks so much. Please advise. Pete
 


KGIII

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My advice would be to not use a VM nor dual boot. Just try some distros in a Live USB environment, find which one you like most, and go for it by erasing your entire disk and writing Linux over it.

It worked for me and I've used Linux exclusively for going on 15 years. Other than an iPod and iPad, I've used Linux exclusively ever since. I haven't ever regretted switching. It probably helps that I had retired and had no reason to use Windows-only software and I'm not a gamer.
 

PhilippinPete

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I appreciate this fast reply. What about the files I have on my Windows 10 system? Should I move all of that to an external drive before I do the install and erase my disk and install Linux?
 

PhilippinPete

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My advice would be to not use a VM nor dual boot. Just try some distros in a Live USB environment, find which one you like most, and go for it by erasing your entire disk and writing Linux over it.

It worked for me and I've used Linux exclusively for going on 15 years. Other than an iPod and iPad, I've used Linux exclusively ever since. I haven't ever regretted switching. It probably helps that I had retired and had no reason to use Windows-only software and I'm not a gamer.
 

PhilippinPete

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Being a newbie, I need to ask... when you say "erase my entire Disk" are you referring to the USB or my laptop? Can I save the exsisting files I have on my laptop now?
 

Condobloke

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I would like the option of being able to switch between operating systems and Virtualbox sounds like the answer.
Pete, wait for someone here to advise you how to set up Virtual box.......that will be the answer to your stated desire above.
When you have some experience under your belt, you may choose to wipe the entire Windows hdd and install just Linux.......but that is probably not a decision to make now. Better you make it in your own good time, rather than doing it in a rush and regretting it later. :)

Virtual Box is definitely an answer.
 

Condobloke

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If you are able, it would be a good idea to make a backup of your current Windows install, now. .....regardless of whether you go ahead with virtual box or not. ...;)
 

wizardfromoz

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I totally understand where Member @KGIII is coming from, and put a "love" on it as proof.

I started dabbling with Linux (Mandrake) in 2003, then Ubuntu in 2010/2011, but took until 2014 to burn my bridges with Windows, and I too have never regretted it.

BUT (and Wizard's but is never far behind him), his answer is too short and too incomplete for you to take action on immediately.

Act in haste and repent at leisure.

Safeguarding personal data is important, as is having a backdoor option should you not like Linux.

So in Windows 7, 8 or 10 (tell us which) you can make a recovery disk or recovery usb stick. For this Dell I bought 2 years ago, I have a stick 16 GB in size, which will likely only get used if I wish to sell the computer?

For virtual solutions, Virtual Box is as good as any, how much RAM (memory) do you have?

Also identify if there are any Windows programs you just cannot do without, and we can steer you to finding Linux alternatives, if they exist. A good site is https://alternativeto.net/

Specs (specifications) on your computer will help.

You could also do well to look at my Post here

https://linux.org/threads/safe-download-sites.30541/post-100664

... where I suggest some options for putting multiple Linux on a USB stick to try out.

BTW when I blew away Windows 7 in 2014, I was multibooting 3 Linux in days - all were a good introduction, and they were Ubuntu, Zorin and Linux Mint.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 

Vrai

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As a beginner with zero Linux experience, I am looking for advice on installing an OS like "Zorin" or "Mint" using Virtualbox. I'm using a two year old HP Pavilion laptop. My daily use consists of watching the news on YT and other video platforms, using messenger to communicate with friends, posting pics, listening to music, making a few personal videos to share with family and friends and some word processing. I was watching a Zorin tutorial on YT and I liked what I saw. Do you have any advice for running a Linux distribution, that is user friendly (for someone like me, who uses Windows) with Virtualbox, or can you guide me to a tutorial that will help me complete this process? I would like the option of being able to switch between operating systems and Virtualbox sounds like the answer. Again... thanks so much. Please advise. Pete
I have a desktop computer running Linux Mint with a number of 'Linux' distros installed in VirtualBox.
Most of the Linux distros I have tried to install in VirtualBox have worked just fine. Some do not.
It is my opinion (and has been my experience) that many things installed in VirtualBox do not run as well as they would if installed on 'bare metal' or even from a "Live" image.
I have no idea regarding running VirtualBox on Windows host.
The VirtualBox web site has some very good information about installing and running VirtualBox.

I appreciate this fast reply. What about the files I have on my Windows 10 system? Should I move all of that to an external drive before I do the install and erase my disk and install Linux?
You should definitely make a backup copy of your files! You do not need to "move" the files - just be sure to make a backup copy to an external device.

Being a newbie, I need to ask... when you say "erase my entire Disk" are you referring to the USB or my laptop? Can I save the existing files I have on my laptop now?
Referring to the hard drive in the laptop. All your files on the disk will be gone! Including your Windows OS. Make a backup copy first. You may want to make a 'back-up' of your Windows installation also. If you have a Windows installation disc that is good but re-installing will also entail installing all the Windows updates - ugh! I would make a disk image or clone of my hard drive before experimenting or installing stuff.
 

KGIII

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Back up any Win10 files, like your personal documents and things like that (which you should already have backed up), and just jump into the deep end. It really is the best way to learn - in *my* experience.

And, I mean wipe the internal hard drive - so that there are no remnants of Windows remaining.

Over the years, mostly online, I've seen untold numbers of people try to learn to use Linux. They'll dual boot for a while, but then quit and just go back to Windows when they come across a problem they can't solve. They never really give it a full chance.

If I had to guess, I bet it's similar to the figures for learning an instrument. About 90% of people stop taking music lessons within a year. I suspect that 90% of the people that try Linux give up within the first year.

There's a learning curve. Buckle down and learn it. Unless you *absolutely* need to have Windows, don't keep it around. If you quit smoking, you don't keep a pack of cigarettes handy for 'just in case.'

You should already have your personal documents backed up, regardless of what operating system you use. So, make sure they're up to date backups and format the complete drive to install your favorite Linux distro - the distro that best suits your needs and best helps you meet your goals.
 

KimWilson

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I downloaded the Linux Mint .iso and expanded and wrote it to DVD. Then I copied the files from the DVD to a USB (my current Win 7 desktop DVD isn't recognizing anything that doesn't have some kind of .exe file or something on it, it's strange, when I put the DVD in my Win 7 laptop, I can see the Linux Mint files, but on my desktop, it won't recognize the DVD in the drive). I copied the files from the DVD in my laptop to an empty drive on my desktop computer, then to a USB drive, to boot from the USB drive, then shut down my desktop computer and selected the USB drive to boot from, but it won't boot. Do I have to change some files on the USB drive first?
Here's a snapshot of the files that are on the USB drive now:
1599272246211.png
 

PhilippinPete

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I totally understand where Member @KGIII is coming from, and put a "love" on it as proof.

I started dabbling with Linux (Mandrake) in 2003, then Ubuntu in 2010/2011, but took until 2014 to burn my bridges with Windows, and I too have never regretted it.

BUT (and Wizard's but is never far behind him), his answer is too short and too incomplete for you to take action on immediately.

Act in haste and repent at leisure.

Safeguarding personal data is important, as is having a backdoor option should you not like Linux.

So in Windows 7, 8 or 10 (tell us which) you can make a recovery disk or recovery usb stick. For this Dell I bought 2 years ago, I have a stick 16 GB in size, which will likely only get used if I wish to sell the computer?

For virtual solutions, Virtual Box is as good as any, how much RAM (memory) do you have?

Also identify if there are any Windows programs you just cannot do without, and we can steer you to finding Linux alternatives, if they exist. A good site is https://alternativeto.net/

Specs (specifications) on your computer will help.

You could also do well to look at my Post here

https://linux.org/threads/safe-download-sites.30541/post-100664

... where I suggest some options for putting multiple Linux on a USB stick to try out.

BTW when I blew away Windows 7 in 2014, I was multibooting 3 Linux in days - all were a good introduction, and they were Ubuntu, Zorin and Linux Mint.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
Ok, so I can use a usb and something like "Rufus" and run my Linux from the boot menu correct? and then eventually decide if I want to totally walk away from Windows? I have 11.9 Gigs of Ram available
 

wizardfromoz

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...run my Linux from the boot menu correct?
Basically, Pete. Linux will generate its own Menu, known as a Grub Menu, where Grub is the GRand Universal Bootloader.

Linux will be on top, and there will be an entry called Windows Boot Manager, which will launch Windows.You use one or the other at a time.

12 GB of RAM will easily run any Linux known.

Wizard
 

wizardfromoz

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@KimWilson , G'day and welcome to linux.org :)

You won't be the first, nor will you be the last, to think that you can install Linux that way, so it is an understandable mistake.

But if I were to dissect your procedure above, I would answer it with "Nope" about 7 times over. :)

Linux cannot be installed that way. The .iso has to be "burned" to USB or DVD, just as you might use a burning solution to capture music.

Rufus, mentioned above by Pete, is one such burning solution, another is Balena Etcher, which is very user-friendly.

Brian, @Condobloke , whom you have seen above, with the beautiful dog Belle that might like to play with your cat, has a good article in our Linux Mint section, and @PhilippinPete can take note too.

It is at https://linux.org/threads/how-to-try-linux-mint-on-your-windows-pc.20993/

Brian's thread, broadly speaking, can be applied to many more Linux Distros than just Linux Mint.

Kim if you have further questions after reading Brian's material, start you own Thread either in Mint or in Getting Started, mention you've read Brian's Thread, and someone will be along to help.

Saturday here in Oz, so to all

Avagudweegend and stay safe

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 

PhilippinPete

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Ok, so I can use a usb and something like "Rufus" and run my Linux from the boot menu correct? and then eventually decide if I want to totally walk away from Windows? I have 11.9 Gigs of Ram available
 

Condobloke

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beautiful dog Belle that might like to play with your cat,
Belle is now your friend for life......you called her beautiful ....and the mere mention of a cat bought her to immediate attention..!!
When you read that topic, Kim.....read it again ....and again.....until you are subconsciously doing the actions as you read.
Once you get into the swing of things it turns out to be terrifyingly simple.

Just start a fresh topic and yell out for any help.
 

Condobloke

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JUST SAW YOUR RESPONSE....

YES
Ok, so I can use a usb and something like "Rufus" and run my Linux from the boot menu correct? and then eventually decide if I want to totally walk away from Windows? I have 11.9 Gigs of Ram available
All you say there is 100% correct.
 

PhilippinPete

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This is a freaking AWESOME forum! Thanks to every one of you for your recommendations. I am leaning towards Zorin Education 64 bit iso but I want to also take a look at Mint.
I am basically a video watcher, messenger chatter, word proccesser user, picture and video sharer (a novice) book and news reader and critical thinker/logical information researcher.
I am NOT a programmer or tech guy, just a retired sailor/chef, freedom lover. But something about the proprietary nature of Windows and Mac OS's bothers me and hangs over my head like a dark cloud and I want to escape that feeling. A heartfelt thanks to all who are helping me out here. I think a Linux distro is the best thing for me. I can copy and save all my info onto my 2TB Seagate external drive and do a Linux install. I am looking forward to this adventure! I will check out the thread by Brian, @Condobloke
 

wizardfromoz

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Pete, that's heartwarming to "hear" (read).

Brian and I came here a little over 3 years ago and we wouldn't be anywhere else for quids.

If/when you get a chance between Adventure 1 with Linux and Adventure 101, consider swinging over to Member Introductions and telling us a little of the PhilippinPete story, and meet a few more of "The Gang".

In these COVID times, it is a nice way to meet people without fear of your health. :)

Chris
 


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