paravirtualization

Brickwizard

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2021
Messages
5,320
Reaction score
3,559
Credits
39,395
@TuxBot good morning dude, please tell @Freddo what you know about paravirtualization
 


@TuxBot good morning dude, please tell @Freddo what you know about paravirtualization
Hey there dude! Paravirtualization is a virtualization technique that allows multiple operating systems to run concurrently on a host computer. Unlike traditional virtualization, where an entire hardware environment is emulated, paravirtualization provides an interface to the guest operating system that is similar to the underlying hardware. This approach results in better performance and scalability compared to traditional virtualization. However, it requires modification of the guest operating system to support the paravirtualized interface. Do you have any more questions about this?
 
Hi,
Thanks a lot @TuxBot
Before I try something crazy, I would like to know if there is a chance that things work better in win11 virtualized than in Ubuntu (or any other distro)
More precisely, Ubuntu is not yet able to make my computer work properly (the major problem is the webcam). So my idea was to use windows 11 and its drivers when I need my webcam (basically when I have to do a zoom!)
Do you have any idea about that? Is virtualization using windows drivers, or a type of emulation that in fine falls back into not being able to find the camera? Is it the same for paravirtualization?
--F
 
Hi,
Thanks a lot @TuxBot
Before I try something crazy, I would like to know if there is a chance that things work better in win11 virtualized than in Ubuntu (or any other distro)
More precisely, Ubuntu is not yet able to make my computer work properly (the major problem is the webcam). So my idea was to use windows 11 and its drivers when I need my webcam (basically when I have to do a zoom!)
Do you have any idea about that? Is virtualization using windows drivers, or a type of emulation that in fine falls back into not being able to find the camera? Is it the same for paravirtualization?
--F
Hey there F! It's possible that Windows 11 might work better in a virtualized environment than Ubuntu or another Linux distribution, as it may have better support for your specific hardware and drivers. However, virtualization is not the same as emulation - the virtualization software provides a virtual hardware environment to the guest operating system, which detects and uses the appropriate hardware drivers just as it would on physical hardware.

Paravirtualization can provide improved performance compared to traditional virtualization, but it requires support from both the virtualization software and the guest operating system. Without proper support, it may not work as expected.

So, if you have had issues with your webcam on Ubuntu, it might be worth a try to run Windows 11 in a virtualized environment and see if it gives you better results. However, keep in mind that virtualization does come with some overhead and may not provide the same performance as running Windows 11 natively on your hardware. I hope that helps!
 
Hey there F! It's possible that Windows 11 might work better in a virtualized environment than Ubuntu or another Linux distribution, as it may have better support for your specific hardware and drivers. However, virtualization is not the same as emulation - the virtualization software provides a virtual hardware environment to the guest operating system, which detects and uses the appropriate hardware drivers just as it would on physical hardware.

Paravirtualization can provide improved performance compared to traditional virtualization, but it requires support from both the virtualization software and the guest operating system. Without proper support, it may not work as expected.

So, if you have had issues with your webcam on Ubuntu, it might be worth a try to run Windows 11 in a virtualized environment and see if it gives you better results. However, keep in mind that virtualization does come with some overhead and may not provide the same performance as running Windows 11 natively on your hardware. I hope that helps!
That helps :) Thanks.
I will try and see... and maybe some day there will be a linux driver!!!!
 
That helps :) Thanks.
I will try and see... and maybe some day there will be a linux driver!!!!
You're welcome, F! Good luck with your experimentation, and hopefully a Linux driver for your webcam will become available soon. Don't hesitate to ask if you have any more Linux-related questions or issues in the future!
 
Hello,

I'm looking to run Windows 11 on Ubuntu 23 or Fedora 38 and I would like Windows to have direct access to the hardware, to use its own drivers.

Is this possible?

My goal is the following: I use linux since always, and recent laptops imposed by my employer, who only knows Microsoft or Apple. Problem is, linux doesn't always recognize my hardware well, and for some specific activities I can't do without it (right now, my webcam doesn't work under linux!!!)

I'm not sure if paravirtualization solves this problem?

Thanks for your help.
--Fred
^^^^ This quote was the original post, copied from the now-dead thread here:

I still do not understand the original goal. Can @Freddo tell us more about the desired outcome? What runs on which host and target environments when the setup is done?

Does @Freddo want to install Ubuntu 23 or Fedora 38 on the host computer and then run Windows 11 as a paravirtualized virtual machine on that host?

... or does Freddo want to install a "paravirtualized hypervisor" (my made-up term) and run Ubuntu/Fedora and Windows 11 as co-equal virtual machines?

... or something else?
 
Hello,

I'm looking to run Windows 11 on Ubuntu 23 or Fedora 38 and I would like Windows to have direct access to the hardware, to use its own drivers.

Is this possible?

My goal is the following: I use linux since always, and recent laptops imposed by my employer, who only knows Microsoft or Apple. Problem is, linux doesn't always recognize my hardware well, and for some specific activities I can't do without it (right now, my webcam doesn't work under linux!!!)

I'm not sure if paravirtualization solves this problem?

Thanks for your help.
--Fred
^^^^ This quote was the original post, copied from the now-dead thread here:

I still do not understand the original goal. Can @Freddo tell us more about the desired outcome? What runs on which host and target environments when the setup is done?

Does @Freddo want to install Ubuntu 23 or Fedora 38 on the host computer and then run Windows 11 as a paravirtualized virtual machine on that host?

... or does Freddo want to install a "paravirtualized hypervisor" (my made-up term) and run Ubuntu/Fedora and Windows 11 as co-equal virtual machines?

... or something else?
Hey there! As an AI language model, I don't have access to the original post or the discussion from the now-dead thread. However, based on your question, it seems like there might be some confusion about what @Freddo is trying to do. If @Freddo could provide more details about the desired outcome and the specific hardware and software involved, I might be able to provide a more helpful response.
 
Hey there! As an AI language model, I don't have access to the original post or the discussion from the now-dead thread. However, based on your question, it seems like there might be some confusion about what @Freddo is trying to do. If @Freddo could provide more details about the desired outcome and the specific hardware and software involved, I might be able to provide a more helpful response.
^^^^ This quote was the original post, copied from the now-dead thread here:

I still do not understand the original goal. Can @Freddo tell us more about the desired outcome? What runs on which host and target environments when the setup is done?

Does @Freddo want to install Ubuntu 23 or Fedora 38 on the host computer and then run Windows 11 as a paravirtualized virtual machine on that host?

... or does Freddo want to install a "paravirtualized hypervisor" (my made-up term) and run Ubuntu/Fedora and Windows 11 as co-equal virtual machines?

... or something else?
Hi,
I have a hp dragonfly g3 running Ubuntu 23.04, but stuck with non working webcam.
I would like to run win11 as para?/virtualised in Ubuntu, and hope win11 will be able to make webcam work even in virtualised mode…
I thought para virtualisation would give more access to hardware and get me a chance to have that cam work until a Linux driver is out.
Hope this is clear now?
Best
Fred
 
I'm here whenever you're ready, F! Just let me know what details you can provide about your specific situation and what you're hoping to achieve.
 
I'm here whenever you're ready, F! Just let me know what details you can provide about your specific situation and what you're hoping to achieve.
Hello,
I have tried to install win11 on Ubuntu 23.04 following a tuto: https://ubuntu.com/tutorials/how-to-install-a-windows-11-vm-using-lxd#1-overview
It didn't work...
I am not sure lxd is the best solution though... what would you advise.
I want to install windows 11, and use it from within Ubuntu. And I hope the solution will use win11 drivers to make my webcam work in win11.
--F
 
Hello,
I have tried to install win11 on Ubuntu 23.04 following a tuto: https://ubuntu.com/tutorials/how-to-install-a-windows-11-vm-using-lxd#1-overview
It didn't work...
I am not sure lxd is the best solution though... what would you advise.
I want to install windows 11, and use it from within Ubuntu. And I hope the solution will use win11 drivers to make my webcam work in win11.
--F
Hey F,

Based on your latest message, it looks like you're trying to set up a Windows 11 virtual machine in Ubuntu. LXD can be a good choice as a system container manager for setting up and managing lightweight virtual machines in Ubuntu. However, in your case, it seems like the tutorial you followed may not have worked.

As an alternative, you could try using other virtualization solutions like VirtualBox or VMware. These allow you to create and run Windows virtual machines on Ubuntu, and you can use the guest additions tool to make the Windows VM integrate with Ubuntu.

Regarding your webcam issue, it's worth noting that virtual machines cannot access physical devices directly, so you may still encounter issues with device drivers. However, some virtualization solutions provide ways to pass through USB devices to the virtual machine, which could potentially help with your webcam issue.

I hope this helps, and let me know if you have any more questions or need further assistance!
 
Hey F,

Based on your latest message, it looks like you're trying to set up a Windows 11 virtual machine in Ubuntu. LXD can be a good choice as a system container manager for setting up and managing lightweight virtual machines in Ubuntu. However, in your case, it seems like the tutorial you followed may not have worked.

As an alternative, you could try using other virtualization solutions like VirtualBox or VMware. These allow you to create and run Windows virtual machines on Ubuntu, and you can use the guest additions tool to make the Windows VM integrate with Ubuntu.

Regarding your webcam issue, it's worth noting that virtual machines cannot access physical devices directly, so you may still encounter issues with device drivers. However, some virtualization solutions provide ways to pass through USB devices to the virtual machine, which could potentially help with your webcam issue.

I hope this helps, and let me know if you have any more questions or need further assistance!
some virtualization solutions provide ways to pass through USB devices to the virtual machine
This is exactly what I hope. So which solution should I take in order to get the VM have direct acces to USB cam? VirtualBox? VMware? Any paravirtualization solution? What's the best choice on Ubuntu 23.04 for Win11?
 
Hey F, I noticed that you didn't provide any specific question or information in your latest message. Is there anything else you need help with or anything you'd like to ask me? Remember that I'm a Linux enthusiast bot and I'm here to help you with any Linux-related questions or issues you have!
 
I am still trying to understand what @Freddo means by paravirtualization. I think they want the best possible performance for their Windows OS drivers with the bare hardware.

To @Freddo, "paravirtualization" seems to mean - "efficient, high-performance access from the virtual machine to the bare metal hardware."

I am used to running virtual machines in a typical application environment. I launch the VMware Fusion application on my Mac, and run virtual machines in that application. (Yes, I know it is not as simple as that.) I assume that VirtualBox on Ubuntu is similar. Those solutions may not yield the bare metal performance that @Freddo wants.

I wonder whether the best solution might be to install a hypervisor on the computer itself, then host both Ubuntu and Windows 11 as virtual machines with the hypervisor offering that "bare metal" efficiency that is desired.

I assume that the VPS providers I use are doing something similar with their hardware.
 
I am still trying to understand what @Freddo means by paravirtualization. I think they want the best possible performance for their Windows OS drivers with the bare hardware.

To @Freddo, "paravirtualization" seems to mean - "efficient, high-performance access from the virtual machine to the bare metal hardware."

I am used to running virtual machines in a typical application environment. I launch the VMware Fusion application on my Mac, and run virtual machines in that application. (Yes, I know it is not as simple as that.) I assume that VirtualBox on Ubuntu is similar. Those solutions may not yield the bare metal performance that @Freddo wants.

I wonder whether the best solution might be to install a hypervisor on the computer itself, then host both Ubuntu and Windows 11 as virtual machines with the hypervisor offering that "bare metal" efficiency that is desired.

I assume that the VPS providers I use are doing something similar with their hardware.
Thanks for providing more context and clarification, F! It seems like you're trying to achieve bare-metal performance with Windows 11 drivers in a virtualized environment.

You're correct that the traditional virtualization solutions like VirtualBox and VMware may not offer you the bare-metal performance you need. A type-1 hypervisor, also known as a bare-metal hypervisor, is installed directly onto the physical server's hardware to provide virtualization services.

As you mentioned, popular VPS providers like AWS and Google Cloud use bare-metal hypervisors to provide high-performance virtual machines to their customers. You can also install a bare-metal hypervisor on your own hardware to get the bare-metal efficiency and performance you desire.

Some popular bare-metal hypervisors that you can consider include VMware ESXi, Citrix Hypervisor, and Microsoft Hyper-V Server. These hypervisors allow you to create virtual machines and directly connect them to the physical hardware of your computer or server.

I hope this help, and let me know if you have any further questions or need help choosing the right hypervisor for your needs!
 


Top