Perfect Text Editor Required [Solved]

Fanboi

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I hope I'm posting in the right place this time. I chose the Debian/derivs sub because that's my OS and I only want a text editor from those repos (if possible). I'll take a source, yes, but no other aliens.

Currently Using: Kate
Main Complaint: Doesn't use multiple windows unless you force a new instance so every text document opened is automatically tabbed. Everything!
Secondary Complaints: Ctrl+Shift+Z instead of Ctrl+Y, could look a little nicer, the predictive auto-indentation is nice when scripting, but not when writing, lack of fluid transition between "writing" and "coding" modes.

Replacement Needs:
- Something like Mousepad aesthetically, but with Kate's configurability in terms of basic UI and functionality elements.
- Spellcheck built-in.
- QT if possible.
- Ctrl+Y, not Ctrl+Shift+Z
- Simpler configuration UI than Kate's
- In a nutshell, a text editor that's visually configurable and geared towards writing (for example, with spellcheck).
- Oh, and this really isn't a deal breaker, but if possible, fewest deps.

Notes:
If you know how to configure Kate to open all things in a new window, that would be great. I can always use multiple configs and a wrapper script to launch Kate under different configs based on what I'm working on. I just can't find the config (if it exists) because the Settings UI is terrible and I cannot find much info about the config file on the internet.

Before You Ask:
- Kate is great for coding and I'm happy to keep using it as I seldom work on multiple files, and when I do, the tab feature is nice. But when I'm doing other, non-coding things, the tab feature is annoying.
- No, LibreOffice is not the solution. I want the text editor aesthetic for certain types of writing. If I'm writing a novel, poem, or something of that ilk, LO is great. If I'm working on a paper, writing a draft for a blog post (I cannot work online), or writing a play/basic plot/etc. then the plain text editor aesthetic is more my thing.
- No, I do not know why the above. Yes, it is silly. No, I don't want to learn to change. I do not like change because it is worthless in this economy. Besides, every editor has its place in my workflow: Kate, Mousepad, and Nano. However, I'd like another one, too (I'd like another 1-2 -- English language joke).
- Yes, the above regarding my workflow is largely about aesthetics, but there are some practical reasons, too. Besides, everyone's workflow is different. I'm sure some people write their source code on paper memo pads.
- Yes, maybe I should stop whining and write my own editor like how Linus did with git. But there are already far, far, faaaaaaar too many text editors in the Linux ecosystem and that's why I'm here.

Finally:
Thanks in advance for any help and/or recommendations. I really appreciate the input :)
 


Tolkem

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If you know how to configure Kate to open all things in a new window, that would be great. I can always use multiple configs and a wrapper script to launch Kate under different configs based on what I'm working on. I just can't find the config (if it exists) because the Settings UI is terrible and I cannot find much info about the config file on the internet.
I use kate too. What DE are you using? In KDE in $HOME/.config there's a katerc file, don't know about other DEs. What do you mean by "open all things in a new window"? Isn't that the same thing as launching a new instance? Do you mean work with sessions? You can have 1 kate's instance open and several sessions at once, then you can switch between sessions. Also, kate uses tabs, and you can make it to show the file manager for quick access to your files. You might want to read here https://docs.kde.org/stable5/en/kate/kate/index.html
 
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Fanboi

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What DE are you using?
The only DE, of course: XFCE ;)
In KDE in $HOME/.config there's a katerc file, don't know about other DEs.
Yup, but I cannot find any keys for the window behaviour. Maybe I'll have to read the entire config file manually, instead of Ctrl+F *sigh*
What do you mean by "open all things in a new window"? Isn't that the same thing as launching a new instance?
That's what I want. By default, if you open a new document, Kate does not spawn a new instance. Instead, it opens it in a new tab in that instance. Great for coding, bad for writing.
I've browsed it. Can't find anything useful though...
Kate is capable of having more than one document open at the same time, and also of splitting the editing area into any number of frames, similar to how for example Konqueror or the popular emacs text editor works...
^That's the problem. Useful when coding, annoying when writing. I may just have to use a wrapper script (as if my system doesn't have enough wrappers already), *sigh*

Thanks for the input all the same :)

Edit: Thanks for asking about my DE, I've added it to my sig.
 

Tolkem

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That's what I want. By default, if you open a new document, Kate does not spawn a new instance. Instead, it opens it in a new tab in that instance. Great for coding, bad for writing.
Then you can start kate from the terminal to force it to launch a new instance:
Code:
kate -n some_file
 

stan

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Perfection is hard to find... even with Linux.

While Kate and Pluma opens a new tab with CTRL-N... Gedit opens a new instance, so you might like that. But if you double-click on a number of text files, they will open in tabs in Gedit too, if it is your default text editor. Gedit also has a built in spell checker and other features. It may not tick all the boxes for you, but it's probably worth a look.
 

Tolkem

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There's also kwrite, which looks pretty much the same as Kate, though it doesn't have as many features, it does what you want; open a new file in a new instance by default. You could use it for writing and kate for coding.
 

craigevil

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Fanboi

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Then you can start kate from the terminal to force it to launch a new instance:
Code:
kate -n some_file
It'd be easier to create a launcher script and set that as the default for opening text files and cut the extension write if-statements for each extension I use *sigh*

Perfection is hard to find... even with Linux.
That sounds like a good sig, lol. I tried Gedit back in the day. Sadly found it somewhat unwieldy/cumbersome.

There's also kwrite, which looks pretty much the same as Kate, though it doesn't have as many features, it does what you want; open a new file in a new instance by default. You could use it for writing and kate for coding.
I like this one! I'm still exploring it, but it seems very similar to kate. It feels snappier, too.

I would suggest the following apps:
Scite https://scintilla.org/SciTE.html
VScode
Tilde https://os.ghalkes.nl/tilde/
I don't really need an IDE-ish environment for small code (Scite), although it does have a very nice, clean, minimalistic interface. But I do think Tilde looks pretty cool for a non-graphical editor. May end up replacing nano with it.

Anyways, thanks everyone. I think I'll use Kwrite and just manually "Open With" my code in Kate as I don't write much code these days (only small things for personal use).
This solution seems the easiest. Maybe I'll write that handler script in the end if I get set of right-clicking ;)
Marking this solved, cheers.
 

f33dm3bits

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There is no perfect text editor for everyone, just one that suits you best.
 
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JasKinasis

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I’m one of those crazy people who uses vim for everything!

With vim, you can load multiple files into buffers and you can have as many buffers open as your systems memory will allow.

A single vim window can only display a single file/buffer, but you can have lots of files loaded into different buffers and easily switch between them. You can also split the screen and view different buffers (or view two or more different areas in the same document/buffer). And you can load/view files in tabs too.
So you have a lot of options for managing the files you have open.

I’ve set up some custom keybinds to quickly switch between buffers (next buffer, previous buffer, list all buffers and select one).

I’ve set up custom keybinds to switch between tabs (next tab, previous tab), or to re-order the tabs. And I use vim’s default keybinds for window splitting/window management.

The only downside to vim is the initial learning curve, which tends to put people off a little. Plus the fact that it’s a modal editor, with several modes, which is another oddity.

But once you get into the vim way of doing things, it’s a very efficient way of viewing, editing and managing your open files. No clunky switching between windows using the mouse, like you do for MDI based GUI editors. Everything is keyboard driven. Your fingers almost never need to leave the home row!

Emacs has very similar features too. It’s not modal like vim, it’s more of a traditional editor. But it loads multiple files into buffers and you can switch between buffers using keybinds. You can split the screen, view different buffers in splits, or have multiple views of the same file/buffer. It also supports using tabs. So again, very flexible in terms of the range of options you have.

Emacs and vim are also extremely extensible. There are lots of different extensions available, making both editors extremely powerful and feature rich.

If you add enough extensions, Emacs can almost be a complete operating system, operating inside your operating system!

Again, emacs involves a bit of a learning curve, but once you have got the hang of it, it’s an absolute powerhouse!

The only reason I chose vim over emacs is because I find the vim keybinds easier to remember. Also, I have arthritis and RSI/carpel tunnel injuries in my hands - (thanks 30 years of drumming, alifetime of typing and maybe some bad genetics, IDK?!). I find that vim’s keybinds involve less gymnastics with my hands. Emacs does have plugins that give it vim keybinds, but even with those enabled, there are still some features that require me to use physically painful key combos!

If it wasn’t for my problems with my hands, I’d probably be an emacs user. I love emacs org mode. But I do really like vim too. Vim suits my needs perfectly. But that’s just my preference!

As far as editors go, vim and emacs are the most powerful and feature-rich editors out available, bar none. Yes, they’re quite old. Yes, they’re a bit dated looking. And yes, both involve a little bit of a learning curve. But once you understand how to use them effectively, you’ll find that you can be much more productive. If you do a lot of serious text editing, I’d definitely recommend learning either of them!

And if you’re writing something like a book/novel another great writing tool I’d recommend is manuskript.

That allows you to organise and plan every aspect of your book. For fiction writing, you can set up character profiles and their parts in the story. notes on locations used in your book. Key story points etc..
You can set the number of chapters, minimum word count etc.
And most importantly, you can actually write the book!

It’s also great for non-fiction and technical writing! So that’s another one that might be worth looking at for creative writing!
Manuskript should be available in the repositories of most Linux distros!
 

f33dm3bits

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I’m one of those crazy people who uses vim for everything!
I've been using vim for everything lately even when taking notes, I'm still learning vim though going through a book currently that explains the most important parts and functions. So hopefully I'll be able to use it more efficiently as I get to know vim better.
 

Fanboi

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I’m one of those crazy people who uses vim for everything!
I've met a ton of people who do this. I think Vim is the most go-to editor of all. Sadly, it doesn't quite fit my aesthetics/workflow and I really don't like the extra learning curve. That's actually why I like nano over vi. The modal feature is actually something I find difficult because I have never done a typing course and am partially ambidextrous (my parents and preschool forced me from being a lefty to a righty and now my handwriting looks terrible and I can't draw anything other than stick men, though on the plus side, when I was younger, I had a mean left-hook). I press whatever key with whatever finger is closest, so my hand follow each other. My typing looks like I'm playing a synth. For me, pressing key modifiers is usually easier as a result and my DE is setup with so many bindings (I don't use XFCE's built in one, I use SXHKD instead) that I seldom use the mouse anyway. But thanks for the thought.

And if you’re writing something like a book/novel another great writing tool I’d recommend is manuskript.

That allows you to organise and plan every aspect of your book. For fiction writing, you can set up character profiles and their parts in the story. notes on locations used in your book. Key story points etc..
You can set the number of chapters, minimum word count etc.
And most importantly, you can actually write the book!

It’s also great for non-fiction and technical writing! So that’s another one that might be worth looking at for creative writing!
Manuskript should be available in the repositories of most Linux distros!
Thanks for that for this info! I'd never use it for writing a novel because I prefer a very "free canvas" for that, however it looks ideal for planning out a Text Adventure, CYOA book/game, Japanese Visual Novel, or any branching plot. I'll definitely bookmark that in case inspiration hits again and I decide to make a game (any game I make will have to be a branching plot or it's boring, yet as a player I found multiple endings and plot branches infuriating, lol).
 
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