Question about complete bootable os and all program copy in live ubuntu using dd command

Bigshissam

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I am upgrading from a 1 tb sata hdd to a 2 tb pciexpress ssd. The old drive is using around 700 gig of space with windows 10 load and my games and programs etc. My plan is to boot to ubuntu live session and use dd command to copy the old drive exactly how the data is written on it to make the new drive bootable with all my stuff intact. From what i've read this will make a 1 tb partition on my new drive with the bootable o.s. and stuff and 300 gig free space which will actually have to be copied bit for bit too leaving the left over 1 tb needing to be partitioned and formatted. Does anyone see any issue arising from this? maybe know a better approach using a live ubuntu mate session or should I go ahead with my plan? many thanks for any insight! Going to actually install ubuntu mate on old drive once i accomplish the task at hand just that i have limited internet data where i live and redownloading everything i am trying to avoid and get this done as fast and clean as possible. I know that dd is very powerful and can foul up with a slip of the keystroke but it seems like the best choice.
 


TechnoJunky

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I've never cloned a disk. I've tarballed and untarred, but never cloned. This site, https://www.ubuntupit.com/top-15-best-disk-cloning-software-for-linux/, gives you several options, DD is one of them, but Gparted is also one. I would be more inclined to check out Gparted first, personally. However, I do used DD exclusively for copying distro ISO's to my pen drives, so I know that works but like you said, get your here and there mixed up and you have no hard drive data to copy anymore :).
 

Bigshissam

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Ty sir #TechnoJunky heading to that site now! Where I read up on the DD command it warned of completely wiping your HDD with a simple mistake kinda scary...:p
 

jglen490

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Regardless of how you restore your Windows to the new drive, you will still need to set up one or more partitions for Linux on the remaining space.
 

TechnoJunky

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Regardless of how you restore your Windows to the new drive, you will still need to set up one or more partitions for Linux on the remaining space.
He already has Linux installed on the hard drive. He wants to duplicate 1 hard drive onto a second hard drive.
 

Vrai

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I usually "clone" a disk when I want some assurance that it will boot afterwards.
Perhaps "dd" can do this - I haven't used it enough to know.
Windows can be very 'persnickety' though when being moved from one disk to another.
I've tried a number of 'cloning' programs including Samsung Magician, Acronis, Macrium Reflect, etc., but find I like Clonezilla the best. Windows has it's own 'image' program built-in.
Just a 'heads-up' - the Samsung Magician software I used when transitioning from a spinning platters hard drive to a SSD filled up my Windows 'Reserved' partition and now Windows disk image software will not work because the partition is too full.
 


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