Relax, and take your time.

70 Tango Charlie

Active Member
Hello everyone,@wizardfromoz @captain-sensible @Condobloke @Rob @atanere

Being a new Linux convert has been a most pleasant and unpleasant experience for me.
That might seem like a contradiction, but I assure you that it is not.

Let me explain. I'll start with the 'most pleasant' part first.
I have learned so much about the Linux Operating System in this past year, that I am amazed at what I can now do because of what I have learned on this forum and other Linux websites. It has been an exhilarating time for me. For that, I want to thank all of those who have listened to my tales of woe for the past few months.

Now for the unpleasant part.
The one thing that most newbies seem to have in common is their impatience. I have been most guilty of not slowing down and digesting things. Hopefully I have changed a little bit along the way. {Thanks Wiz}.

Most of us newbies are in too much of a rush to do stuff, without realizing just how much learning we are going to have to do along the way.
So, I say to all "US" newbies - "S-L-O-W Down Just a Little Bit". Enjoy the ride. It is better than a thrill ride at an amusement park.

Old Geezer, :cool:
Tango Charlie
 


Condobloke

Well-Known Member
Sage advice indeed Charlie.

I remind my family on a regular basis that I am the most patient man in the world. They always answer this statement with a twisted grin....I guess they know me well.

Patience is a virtue, some wiser than me person said. I must admit to throwing the odd 'hissy fit' during and after my first install of Linux....17.1 from memory

In hindsight (20/20 vision), a modicum of patience and rational thinking would have seen the situation resolve itself.

I am sitting here in Changi Airport waiting for a flight from Singapore to Australia....and my patience is wearing thin.
Must be time for another cuppa methinks ! (cup of tea)
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Hopefully I have changed a little bit along the way. {Thanks Wiz}.
always welcome, ya ol' geezer :)

slow down, you move too fast, you've got to make the morning last - simon & garfunkel feelin' groovy

wiz
 

captain-sensible

Well-Known Member
I also agree with @70 Tango Charlie . Also although you can set up partitions during install with say ubuntu I still say first stage should be to get a working OS like knoppix onto a usb.

The reason is , you can take your time set up partitions eg using GParted from knoppix so then its only a case of the install confirming... we found partition /dev/sda2 with swap , do you want to make that your swap?
we found /dev/sda3 with file system ext4 , do you want to make it the partition for root install etc. Thats what i do with installing slackware

That way you know what you have and what should go where, theres no wondering and guessing . Also in a usb OS like knoppix there are other tools that might come in handy
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

Well-Known Member
I am sitting here in Changi Airport waiting for a flight from Singapore to Australia
Enjoy your flight mate. Don't forget self quarantine yourself for 14 days to make sure you haven't picked up that dreaded bug that is going around. :(;)
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

Well-Known Member
Most of us newbies are in too much of a rush to do stuff, without realizing just how much learning we are going to have to do along the way.
As one of your scribes from the 19th century said about patience

5777
 

smooth_buddha

Active Member
Hello everyone,@wizardfromoz @captain-sensible @Condobloke @Rob @atanere

Being a new Linux convert has been a most pleasant and unpleasant experience for me.
That might seem like a contradiction, but I assure you that it is not.

Let me explain. I'll start with the 'most pleasant' part first.
I have learned so much about the Linux Operating System in this past year, that I am amazed at what I can now do because of what I have learned on this forum and other Linux websites. It has been an exhilarating time for me. For that, I want to thank all of those who have listened to my tales of woe for the past few months.

Now for the unpleasant part.
The one thing that most newbies seem to have in common is their impatience. I have been most guilty of not slowing down and digesting things. Hopefully I have changed a little bit along the way. {Thanks Wiz}.

Most of us newbies are in too much of a rush to do stuff, without realizing just how much learning we are going to have to do along the way.
So, I say to all "US" newbies - "S-L-O-W Down Just a Little Bit". Enjoy the ride. It is better than a thrill ride at an amusement park.

Old Geezer, :cool:
Tango Charlie
Tango I can reallly relate to this. I have fell in love with Linux and learning more about computer sciences. It’s so exciting and really opens up a new world of potential I never even realised. Especially having had some health issues been able to learn from home online about Linux is very healing satisfying.

I too am at fault with been very impatient, although I see it as a positive , it’s like having a high enthusiasm and burning passion for something and one can’t stand for mediocrity , one strives to want to learn and master all aspects! but slowly I realise the monumental amount of information that is contained within learning Linux (or any os) and I realise I will never know and understand all of it. `The best one can do is focus on ones interests,goals and enjoy the process of learning and enjoying something new. /it’s humbling to know that one will never know everything and will always have to remain open to new ideas and ever evolving tech.

Linux is so vast I feel as though I could spend a year of solid study and still feel I know very little. I like to think this is why Linux commmunities are so strong because as individuals none of us know everything there is to know but as a community together we can solve any problem and fix any solution and because of this there will always be a need and. A reason to help each other out.
 

jglen490

Active Member
@70 Charlie Tango. You are so right.

I started my Linux journey about 25 years ago, when a friend gave me a set of 20-ish floppy disks with Slackware. It was a good introduction, with a bad distro, and nothing but attitude from Slackware aficionados. That journey took a giant positive leap, when I found a boxed Red Hat 5.2 in a thrift shop, and both life and Linux were looking good. It wasn't long before I could ditch dual booting with Windows, and move on with an old laptop - and my wife could have our Windows PC back full time!

Over time, I tried several Linux and BSD distros, each better than the last. Finally about 14 years ago, I discovered Kubuntu and found "the one". I have tried others, but always came back to Kubuntu, and today I use nothing but the LTS versions, and now run 18.04 on my custom built desktop unit. I do play around with other distros, but now on an old Toshiba laptop, several generations from that first old IBM TP365XD laptop.

I have learned what it means to have stability in a distro, and how hardware and OS influence the choices for each. Still much to learn, and much time - the rest of my life -. to learn it
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter

captain-sensible

Well-Known Member
@jglen490
I started my Linux journey about 25 years ago, when a friend gave me a set of 20-ish floppy disks with Slackware. It was a good introduction, with a bad distro, and nothing but attitude from Slackware aficionados.

Things haven't changed that much. If you ever saw the film about Alan Turing then its not difficult to make the leap that those with extreme mental talent may also have other issues. If i were to make a psychological assessment of some slackware users i might say there is an element being emotionally retarded, an element of supercilliouness and having a warped map of the world. But enough about me ...see what i did there ? Slackware current is a great distro and i use it despite the Slackware aficionados.
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

Well-Known Member
As the song from Monty Pythons film "The life of Brian" goes
here's the opening verse of " Look one the bright side of Life"

Some things in life are bad
They can really make you mad
Other things just make you swear and curse
When you're chewing on life's gristle
Don't grumble, give a whistle
And this'll help things turn out for the best

And always look on the bright side of life
Always look on the light side of life
 


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