Required files to he present in /lib/firmware/amdgpu

One

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There are similar questions that i had already searched but unfortunately couldn't get what I'm searching for.
I'm using kali linux 2021.1 in a lenova ideapad with ryzen 3.

Having some .bin files(below) in the above said directory


  1. bonnaire*
  2. carrizo*
  3. fiji*
  4. green_sardine*
  5. hainan*
  6. hawaii*
  7. kabini*
  8. kaveri*
  9. mullins*
  10. navi*
  11. oland*
  12. picasso*
  13. pitcairn*
  14. polaris*
  15. raven*
  16. renoir*
  17. si58
  18. sienna*
  19. stoney*
  20. tahiti*
  21. tonga*
  22. topaz*
  23. vega*
  24. vegam*
  25. verde*

Among these what are the necessary files and what should be not there.

And also I'm getting an error(below) msg on booting up


[ <some-error-id-i-suppose>] kfd kfd STONEY not supported in kfd


Thanks in advance.
 


Tolkem

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Among these what are the necessary files and what should be not there.
Modifying important system's directories and files such as these, is not recommended as it may leave your system in an unusable state, besides, if you check the size of those files you'll notice that they're tiny, a few KBs only most and maybe a very few MBs some of them. Also, the system only uses what it needs, so only the necessary modules are loaded at boot. My advice, leave these alone and focus on somewhere else to improve performance, which is what I think you're trying to do.
 

f33dm3bits

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Those files are installed there by the package linux-firmware so after an update those will be placed there again, so it's kind of pointless to remove any of them. Also you shouldn't be using Kali if you are not familiar with GNU/Linux, should I use Kali?
 
Last edited:

stan

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i can't see the error message on your boot - forgot to post it ?
The OP used "invisible ink" (white text on a white background). You could switch your forum Default Style (very bottom left corner of page) to "dark default" in order to see it. Or if you click and drag your mouse over the blank area, you'll find this error that he reported:

[ <some-error-id-i-suppose>] kfd kfd STONEY not supported in kfd
 

Tolkem

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The OP used "invisible ink" (white text on a white background). You could switch your forum Default Style (very bottom left corner of page) to "dark default" in order to see it. Or if you click and drag your mouse over the blank area, you'll find this error that he reported:

[ <some-error-id-i-suppose>] kfd kfd STONEY not supported in kfd
Nice tip! Didn't know this. Thanks for sharing. :)
 

One

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Modifying important system's directories and files such as these, is not recommended as it may leave your system in an unusable state, besides, if you check the size of those files you'll notice that they're tiny, a few KBs only most and maybe a very few MBs some of them. Also, the system only uses what it needs, so only the necessary modules are loaded at boot. My advice, leave these alone and focus on somewhere else to improve performance, which is what I think you're trying to do.
It takes almost 3 min 6 sec to boot my system
As you said, it loads up only the necessary files, then why is that I'm getting the message

  • [ <some-error-id-i-suppose>] kfd kfd STONEY not supported in kfd

as you can see i have stoney*.bin files there.
 
Last edited:

One

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i can't see the error message on your boot - forgot to post it ?
  • [ <some-error-id-i-suppose>] kfd kfd STONEY not supported in kfd
this is the message, as im new here, need to learn all the formattings so pls forgive me if anything isn't clear
 
Last edited:

Tolkem

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It takes almost 3 min 6 sec to boot my system
Open a terminal, run this
Code:
systemd-analyze blame
and copy/paste the output in your reply.
 

One

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Open a terminal, run this
Code:
systemd-analyze blame
and copy/paste the output in your reply.
18.802s mysql.service
11.937s snapd.service
11.593s networking.service
9.357s systemd-journal-flush.service
7.521s dev-sda1.device
5.629s NetworkManager.service
5.253s polkit.service
5.233s dev-loop0.device
5.180s bluetooth.service
4.838s systemd-logind.service
4.101s dev-loop3.device
4.062s dev-loop1.device
3.720s smartmontools.service
3.624s dev-loop4.device
3.576s dev-loop2.device
3.256s ModemManager.service
2.258s systemd-udevd.service
2.247s udisks2.service
1.780s [email protected]:amdgpu_bl0.service
1.379s lightdm.service
1.366s plymouth-quit-wait.service
1.330s rsyslog.service
1.309s systemd-rfkill.service
1.118s inetutils-inetd.service
1.100s colord.service
843ms wpa_supplicant.service
834ms binfmt-support.service
745ms e2scrub_reap.service
735ms stunnel4.service
683ms snap-core20-975.mount
640ms snap-core18-1997.mount
601ms snap-gnome\x2d3\x2d28\x2d1804-145.mount
598ms systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service
587ms plymouth-read-write.service
586ms snap-gtk\x2dcommon\x2dthemes-1515.mount
565ms systemd-tmpfiles-setup-dev.service
475ms nfs-config.service
475ms systemd-sysusers.service
430ms systemd-random-seed.service
403ms snap-snapd-11588.mount
386ms upower.service
380ms systemd-tmpfiles-clean.service
313ms console-setup.service
300ms keyboard-setup.service
284ms systemd-udev-trigger.service
273ms systemd-sysctl.service
263ms tor.service
237ms plymouth-start.service
234ms ifupdown-pre.service
204ms dev-hugepages.mount
203ms dev-mqueue.mount
201ms run-rpc_pipefs.mount
200ms sys-kernel-debug.mount
199ms sys-kernel-tracing.mount
190ms kmod-static-nodes.service
179ms systemd-user-sessions.service
173ms systemd-journald.service
168ms systemd-update-utmp.service
86ms phpsessionclean.service
77ms systemd-remount-fs.service
72ms rtkit-daemon.service
63ms proc-sys-fs-binfmt_misc.mount
60ms systemd-modules-load.service
14ms systemd-update-utmp-runlevel.service
6ms sys-fs-fuse-connections.mount
3ms sys-kernel-config.mount
1ms snapd.socket

Thanks for the hint, now i got it.
Also is it recommended to stop the snap and networking services on boot.
 

Tolkem

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Thanks for the hint, now i got it.
Also is it recommended to stop the snap and networking services on boot.
You're welcome. I would also recommend disabling mysql.service which is the one taking the longest, and yeah snapd.service does do that. Networking services are taking that long probably because of snapd and mysql, try disabling those two first, restart, re-run
Code:
systemd-analyze blame
and check how much network.services took this time, otherwise you'll have to start the network by hand, that is, via terminal, I think, never done it, but I assume if you stop that service, stuff like NetworkManager.service won't kick at start, so you'll have to start it with
Code:
sudo systemctl start NetworkManager.service
so it's probably the best just leave it enabled.
There's a couple of services you could disable too if you don't need them at boot:
bluetooth.service
Code:
sudo systemctl disable  bluetooth.service
and [email protected]
Code:
sudo systemctl disable [email protected]
 
Last edited:

One

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You're welcome. I would also recommend disabling mysql.service which is the one taking the longest, and yeah snapd.service does do that. Networking services are taking that long probably because of snapd and mysql, try disabling those two first, restart, re-run
Code:
systemd-analyze blame
and check how much network.services took this time, otherwise you'll have to start the network by hand, that is, via terminal, I think, never done it, but I assume if you stop that service, stuff like NetworkManager.service won't kick at start, so you'll have to start it with
Code:
sudo systemctl start NetworkManager.service
so it's probably the best just leave it enabled.
There's a couple of services you could disable too if you don't need them at boot:
bluetooth.service
Code:
sudo systemctl disable  bluetooth.service
and [email protected]
Code:
sudo systemctl disable [email protected]
Yeah i have done the exact same thing and still i get that boot up error i mentioned earlier.
 

Tolkem

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Yeah i have done the exact same thing and still i get that boot up error i mentioned earlier.
Does the system keep taking 3 mins to boot? This kfd kfd STONEY not supported in kfd can probably be just ignored, it's most likely a firmware that isn't being loaded because it isn't needed, so you don't need to do anything, unless of course it's related to some issue which makes your system behaves strange, does it? If not, just ignore it.
 

One

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Does the system keep taking 3 mins to boot? This kfd kfd STONEY not supported in kfd can probably be just ignored, it's most likely a firmware that isn't being loaded because it isn't needed, so you don't need to do anything, unless of course it's related to some issue which makes your system behaves strange, does it? If not, just ignore it.
Yeah, still the same, it still takes around 3 min to boot, just checked 2min 54 sec to be exact.
I see a set of processes displaying in the screen on boot up on the bg, among which a process which loads a runlevel script i suppose in the path /dev/disk/by-uuid/<some-disk-uuid> which i checked and turned out to be i dont have any by that uuid. This process takes 1 min 30 sec.
 
Last edited:

Fanboi

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The files you mentioned in the OP are graphics firmware and can be removed (you should only remove them by removing their corresponding packages with apt/Synaptic because the system needs auto-configuration afterwards and to update initfamfs because of firmware changes) in favour of a hardware-specific driver(s) package for your PC's graphics, which I assume is an AMD GPU, thus firmware-amd-graphics. Those others are for other chipsets (polaris is nVidia for example) and are likely installed by default as core packages to ensure maximum graphics compatibility out the box. It's well-suited for lived CDs/IMGs (because they detect hardware and load required modules/drivers), which is what Kali is better geared towards and configured for. In fact it was not even advisable to install Kali a few years back. TBH you should only be installing it on a machine dedicated to legal pentesting, if, and only if you are a security researcher.
As a desktop user, you gain nothing by using Kali in day to day tasks -- except headaches. You clearly are a desktop user, so please install Debian, Linux Mint, Manjaro, or any other beginner-friendly OS. Void is a pretty good distro, too (the package manager is similar to pacman). Debian is good because it is beginner-friendly, intermediate-friendly, and expert-friendly, geared for flexibility (as in server or desktop, gaming or workstation, education or research) and comes with installation "tasks" that intuitively install sets of packages for specific environmental needs. It's what Kali is now based off instead of Ubuntu IIRC.

TL;DR don't install Kali, unless you are using that machine for pentesting only. Sadly, Kali has become a "I'm cool coz I use Kali and it's a 1337 haxxor OS" which has led to all the YouTube videos promoting it with silly shite like "How to install <useless to Kali's purpose package> on Kali". Kali's slow boot when installed is because of things which have been tweaked for aforementioned purposes with Kali, eg networking. Plus the packages seem altered to be Kali-specific as apt config points to Kali repos (probably an added factor).
If you want a security-oriented OS (not a pentesting one) then you may find Open BSD (or even FreeBSD) a good place to start, but *BSD is not Linux (it's UNIX) and the BSD family is not so great on hardware compatibility, especially notebooks, nor is it novice-friendly (with the exceptions of GhostBSD and the now defunct PC-BSD (was rebranded or dropped or something)). If you want to stay in the Linux ecosystem, which you should if you already are partially adjusted to Linux or want to do gaming or content creation, honestly Debian is a good security choice since they have a dedicated security team for Stable and a developer security team for Sid.

PS: about the disk by UUID disk thing, you may have edited a partition and that will change the UUID.
 

One

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I'm interested in pentesting and that's why i installed kali in the first place (the only os i use) thinking i can learn on the way for which i have the capability, sure I'm learning at an avg of atleast a couple things abt it daily.

And thanks for taking time explaining.
 

Fanboi

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No prob. It may still boot faster from a USB, using your HDD as persistence (setting that up may be more trouble than it's worth, depending on how fast it boots live) ;)
 
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