Shell Accounts?

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Lash540

Guest
I recently joined the forum after being referred here by a book called " Programming from the Ground Up" By Johnathan Bartlett. In the first couple of pages he makes a reference to something called a Shell Account and that I should see if I can find one for use with the exercises he provides later in his book. I am new to all this so I have no idea what, where, or how to even attempt to locate said book except ask someone else. After this post I will definitely do a search of the forum here and hopefully find an answer to my question however in case that avenue of research fails hopefully this post will get me past this issue.

Thank you in advance,
Lash540
 


A

arochester

Guest
1) Google: " Programming from the Ground Up" By Johnathan Bartlett.
2) The book is 2003/2004. It is 12 years old. Following something so old is questionable.
 
R

rstanley

Guest
A "Shell Account" is an account with a provider that gives you access through a text based, command line interface ONLY, to a computer and/or Internet access. No GUI access. When I taught C Programming at NYU years ago, before the Web even existed, I only had a shell account access to the server at NYU, and that's all I needed.

If you have a Linux computer, you have more than one "Shell", "bash" being the default on most Distros, either through a "Console" or a GUI, "Terminal". Even if you have a Windows computer only, you can run a Linux Live C/D to try out Linux without altering the computer in any way. (Providing your computer uses BIOS, not UEFI.

Even a DOS prompt is an example of a VERY limited, "Shell"!
 
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atanere

Guest
There are a few Linux live distros that should run even without modifying UEFI settings (secure boot, etc). If this is an issue, take a look at recent Ubuntu, Fedora, and openSUSE (this one worked well for me).

Good luck!
 
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Lash540

Guest
1) Google: " Programming from the Ground Up" By Johnathan Bartlett.
2) The book is 2003/2004. It is 12 years old. Following something so old is questionable.
Is it really that old, I had just started reading it. I just came across it and started reading it in the hopes it might take me somewhere. Didn't bother to see what year it was published I figured it should still relevant to some degree.

What would you recommend I pick up instead?
 
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Lash540

Guest
Thanks for the reply rstanley, I really appreciate the gesture. It's rare now a days for people to actually try to help others. Usually people just see others who don't know what they already learned as stupid and not worth the time even though at one point they themselves were in the same position. It's no wonder the world seems to be getting dumber, why try to learn when others are just going to degrade you. Anyway...

So it's an account you telnet to and is command line only.

What I am really curious about is why not just throw a distro on your PC, use a live USB, or something along those lines instead of remote to another PC and pay for the time on it?

Still confused as to why anyone would use this.
 
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Lash540

Guest
@atanere

I am actually trying to get a version of Tiny Core running on my Asus EEE PC 1000HA. I installed it yesterday, was working great but can't seem to get the wifi working. I plan on posting in another area of the forum in the hopes someone else has already found a solution to this problem. I went with Tiny Core because of it's super low usage of memory and hard drive space. Seems legit so far, I was able to use chrome and surf the web without any problems what so ever. Usually with some of the distros you've mentioned I run into problems where the PC just starts to run like garbage. At least on this little EEE.
 
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atanere

Guest
@atanere

I am actually trying to get a version of Tiny Core running on my Asus EEE PC 1000HA. I installed it yesterday, was working great but can't seem to get the wifi working. I plan on posting in another area of the forum in the hopes someone else has already found a solution to this problem. I went with Tiny Core because of it's super low usage of memory and hard drive space. Seems legit so far, I was able to use chrome and surf the web without any problems what so ever. Usually with some of the distros you've mentioned I run into problems where the PC just starts to run like garbage. At least on this little EEE.
Tiny Core is at or near the ultimate extreme on low hardware requirements, especially RAM. I suppose you found this on the Tiny Core Wiki:
http://wiki.tinycorelinux.net/wiki:setting_up_wifi

I've only tried Tiny Core once, and it seems like I had trouble with wireless too, if I'm remembering correctly. The other distros I mentioned above were in case you had a newer model computer using UEFI, but your Asus EEE won't have that issue. Be glad... UEFI is a pain.

There are many other lightweight Linux distros that may work nicely though, depending on how much RAM you have. A big plus for Linux is when it all works as it should, right out of the box. Some of the other lightweight distros have a much better chance of giving you a more satisfying experience. I would recommend checking out some or all of these: Linux Lite, Lubuntu, and LXLE (these are all Ubuntu based and have many features built in). There are many others besides. I found Puppy Linux to be easier with WiFi setup, but its been a long time since I've used it too.

Relating to some of the other comments: Linux has come a long way in the past 12 years. Its easier than ever for the newbie to install (maybe excluding UEFI) and you can quickly and easily install extra software that you may need, like compilers and development tools. Shell accounts provided very useful access to Linux systems and tools remotely, so the newbie could just log in and do whatever task was needed without the headache of installing and maintaining his/her own Linux computer.

Books! Some older material will still be useful, but it is probably hard to separate the useful from the outdated. The web is full of written and video tutorials, much of it for free, But whatever you find you still want to try to date it if you can and/or be wary that things change quickly. If you really like turning pages, check out O'Reilly Publishing here: http://www.oreilly.com

And Google... don't forget Google. Google knows all. :cool::D

Good luck!
 
L

Lash540

Guest
Tiny Core is at or near the ultimate extreme on low hardware requirements, especially RAM. I suppose you found this on the Tiny Core Wiki:
http://wiki.tinycorelinux.net/wiki:setting_up_wifi

I've only tried Tiny Core once, and it seems like I had trouble with wireless too, if I'm remembering correctly. The other distros I mentioned above were in case you had a newer model computer using UEFI, but your Asus EEE won't have that issue. Be glad... UEFI is a pain.

There are many other lightweight Linux distros that may work nicely though, depending on how much RAM you have. A big plus for Linux is when it all works as it should, right out of the box. Some of the other lightweight distros have a much better chance of giving you a more satisfying experience. I would recommend checking out some or all of these: Linux Lite, Lubuntu, and LXLE (these are all Ubuntu based and have many features built in). There are many others besides. I found Puppy Linux to be easier with WiFi setup, but its been a long time since I've used it too.

Relating to some of the other comments: Linux has come a long way in the past 12 years. Its easier than ever for the newbie to install (maybe excluding UEFI) and you can quickly and easily install extra software that you may need, like compilers and development tools. Shell accounts provided very useful access to Linux systems and tools remotely, so the newbie could just log in and do whatever task was needed without the headache of installing and maintaining his/her own Linux computer.

Books! Some older material will still be useful, but it is probably hard to separate the useful from the outdated. The web is full of written and video tutorials, much of it for free, But whatever you find you still want to try to date it if you can and/or be wary that things change quickly. If you really like turning pages, check out O'Reilly Publishing here: http://www.oreilly.com

And Google... don't forget Google. Google knows all. :cool::D

Good luck!
What is so bad about UEFI? I see it being added to a lot of modern tech now a days. I figured it is replacing BIOS because it has to be better... Or am I wrong?

The reason I went with Tiny Core is the fact it's SOOOO light on the RAM and processor use. This ASUS EEE 1000HA PC is weak. The Intel Atom it has isn't that great but it works well enough when the OS installed on it is just as light. One big limiting factor is that it only supports a maximum of 2 GB of RAM at DDR2 553. I did put a 2GB stick in this thing and it made a big difference. I laugh when I start to remember they shipped this thing out to people with XP pre-installed on it plus a bunch of junk apps! Anyway, Tiny Core seemed like the perfect fit since I wanted to save as much memory, processing power, and storage space as I could on this thing. I know there is a fix for the wi-fi problem, it has something to do with Tiny Core not having the WPA/WPA2 encryption protocols installed out of the box. Maybe I will work this out or just install another distro that might not be as light but is still close enough. I previously also tried Trisquel Mini but I kept running into issues using that distro.

This is the list of things I would like out of the EEE PC.

1. I want to be able to surf the web with the adblock extension installed, so I need to use chrome in order to actually get access to this feature. This is hands down the biggest thing I want from the little Netbook. I hate websites that spam the ad banners and all the other trash. I need adblock.

2. I would like to install Open Office or Libre Office.

3. I would like to install GCC. I am trying to learn how to program so that I can get a better job.

4. I would like to install DOOM:RL ( Doom the rouge like ).

That is what I am looking for and I know it can be done because I did it before I just don't remember how I did it.

Anyway back to the books! O'Reilly Publishing, I took a look at the website and I found this....

http://shop.oreilly.com/product/9781118823873.do

Do you think it would be a good place to start? I know there is a ton of stuff online, but the thing is I can't ever seem to find what I am looking for, even with google.
 
A

atanere

Guest
What is so bad about UEFI? I see it being added to a lot of modern tech now a days. I figured it is replacing BIOS because it has to be better... Or am I wrong?

The reason I went with Tiny Core is the fact it's SOOOO light on the RAM and processor use. This ASUS EEE 1000HA PC is weak. The Intel Atom it has isn't that great but it works well enough when the OS installed on it is just as light. One big limiting factor is that it only supports a maximum of 2 GB of RAM at DDR2 553. I did put a 2GB stick in this thing and it made a big difference. I laugh when I start to remember they shipped this thing out to people with XP pre-installed on it plus a bunch of junk apps! Anyway, Tiny Core seemed like the perfect fit since I wanted to save as much memory, processing power, and storage space as I could on this thing. I know there is a fix for the wi-fi problem, it has something to do with Tiny Core not having the WPA/WPA2 encryption protocols installed out of the box. Maybe I will work this out or just install another distro that might not be as light but is still close enough. I previously also tried Trisquel Mini but I kept running into issues using that distro.

This is the list of things I would like out of the EEE PC.

1. I want to be able to surf the web with the adblock extension installed, so I need to use chrome in order to actually get access to this feature. This is hands down the biggest thing I want from the little Netbook. I hate websites that spam the ad banners and all the other trash. I need adblock.

2. I would like to install Open Office or Libre Office.

3. I would like to install GCC. I am trying to learn how to program so that I can get a better job.

4. I would like to install DOOM:RL ( Doom the rouge like ).

That is what I am looking for and I know it can be done because I did it before I just don't remember how I did it.

Anyway back to the books! O'Reilly Publishing, I took a look at the website and I found this....

http://shop.oreilly.com/product/9781118823873.do

Do you think it would be a good place to start? I know there is a ton of stuff online, but the thing is I can't ever seem to find what I am looking for, even with google.
BIOS is very old, and it surely needed to be updated. But UEFI has issues for Linux users. The issues are getting better, but it can still be very difficult to work with, or work around. Part of the problem is that there is no "standard" followed by OEM's. So every different brand computer you work with may behave differently. UEFI has been around for 10+ years, but it was finally required by Microsoft beginning on Windows 8 systems so that the "secure boot" feature could be utilized to protect the system from rootkit-type malware. At that time, however, the secure boot feature was required to have an option to disable... and another setting usually called "legacy mode" was included. For a long time, Linux required legacy mode enabled and secure boot disabled. Linux is getting better at dealing with, especially the major distributions, but there are still problems (at least I have problems with an HP laptop!). Now, in the Windows 10 era, the option of disabling secure boot is no longer required... and it will be a bigger hassle indeed if OEM's choose to eliminate that option. I've not heard of that happening yet, but it's still early in the Win 10 deployment. The future may demand that you shop around for "Linux friendly hardware" if this is important to you. OK, enough on that! Whew! :eek::confused:

With 2GB of RAM, I think you'll do well to run many of the regular or light distributions, some I mentioned earlier. They typically include LibreOffice already and GCC should be in all of their repositories.

1. Chrome/Chromium/Firefox... I think these all will run AdBlockPlus. Firefox (or Sea Monkey) is often included with typical distros, and sometimes AdBlockPlus is already included too. The Opera browser also has ad blocking capability.

2. Office suites are often included, as I said. You can install OpenOffice if you prefer, but usually LibreOffice is the default that is included.

3. GCC should be okay for you. I'm not a programmer, so I can't be sure, but I'd guess that your RAM is okay. Maybe hard drive space could be an issue though.

4. I had to Google DoomRL... I'm not a gamer. But I would think you'll be okay here too. Their website says you'll need a few other packages, and also mp3 support, but this should be okay. Some of the regular distros will ask during installation if you want "extras" like mp3 support, so the easy thing is to allow it then (if you have an Internet connection). Assuming that the gaming is very important, if you need help from those folks, you will be far better off using a regular distro instead of Tiny Core.

C++ for Dummies... again, I'm not a programmer, so I can't give any good advice, just some general thoughts. I'm sure C++ is still used to some extent, and maybe a lot, but it isn't one of the buzzwords that you hear when people talk programming. Java, Perl, Ruby, Python... those are some of the languages I hear discussed more often. It may depend on where you want to go with programming... heck, my company still uses FORTRAN! :eek:o_O If you want to be a Linux kernel dev... I think you'll need the C language. You'll need to investigate this item further, but I'm sure some of the folks here can help.

OK, time for a beer! (Or, I should say... another beer! :D)

Cheers!
 
L

Lash540

Guest
BIOS is very old, and it surely needed to be updated. But UEFI has issues for Linux users. The issues are getting better, but it can still be very difficult to work with, or work around. Part of the problem is that there is no "standard" followed by OEM's. So every different brand computer you work with may behave differently. UEFI has been around for 10+ years, but it was finally required by Microsoft beginning on Windows 8 systems so that the "secure boot" feature could be utilized to protect the system from rootkit-type malware. At that time, however, the secure boot feature was required to have an option to disable... and another setting usually called "legacy mode" was included. For a long time, Linux required legacy mode enabled and secure boot disabled. Linux is getting better at dealing with, especially the major distributions, but there are still problems (at least I have problems with an HP laptop!). Now, in the Windows 10 era, the option of disabling secure boot is no longer required... and it will be a bigger hassle indeed if OEM's choose to eliminate that option. I've not heard of that happening yet, but it's still early in the Win 10 deployment. The future may demand that you shop around for "Linux friendly hardware" if this is important to you. OK, enough on that! Whew! :eek::confused:

With 2GB of RAM, I think you'll do well to run many of the regular or light distributions, some I mentioned earlier. They typically include LibreOffice already and GCC should be in all of their repositories.

1. Chrome/Chromium/Firefox... I think these all will run AdBlockPlus. Firefox (or Sea Monkey) is often included with typical distros, and sometimes AdBlockPlus is already included too. The Opera browser also has ad blocking capability.

2. Office suites are often included, as I said. You can install OpenOffice if you prefer, but usually LibreOffice is the default that is included.

3. GCC should be okay for you. I'm not a programmer, so I can't be sure, but I'd guess that your RAM is okay. Maybe hard drive space could be an issue though.

4. I had to Google DoomRL... I'm not a gamer. But I would think you'll be okay here too. Their website says you'll need a few other packages, and also mp3 support, but this should be okay. Some of the regular distros will ask during installation if you want "extras" like mp3 support, so the easy thing is to allow it then (if you have an Internet connection). Assuming that the gaming is very important, if you need help from those folks, you will be far better off using a regular distro instead of Tiny Core.

C++ for Dummies... again, I'm not a programmer, so I can't give any good advice, just some general thoughts. I'm sure C++ is still used to some extent, and maybe a lot, but it isn't one of the buzzwords that you hear when people talk programming. Java, Perl, Ruby, Python... those are some of the languages I hear discussed more often. It may depend on where you want to go with programming... heck, my company still uses FORTRAN! :eek:o_O If you want to be a Linux kernel dev... I think you'll need the C language. You'll need to investigate this item further, but I'm sure some of the folks here can help.

OK, time for a beer! (Or, I should say... another beer! :D)

Cheers!
So after hours of trying to install Lubuntu, I discovered that the devs for that distro have not updated the recent versions of the distro with the drivers needed in order for it to run properly on my EEE PC or any Intel based graphics PC. There are temporary drivers to get but they don't work for very long before the devs of lubuntu make some changes that break them again apparently.

I tried Xubuntu and that one seems to be up to date with the driver support on the EEE PC and works just fine. This is also great because it comes bundled with Libre Office pre-installed so that is one less headache I have to deal with.

My little EEE PC had a 250 GB SSD but yesterday I swapped it for a 1 TB 5400 RPM Western Digital Cavier Blue Drive.

Now that I have an OS installed and working properly on this little machine, wi-fi and all, how do I install applications like Chrome onto my little netbook? Where can I learn how to do this? I've been googling all day and can't seem to find one article that explains how it all works and how it does it. Some of the guides that I tried to follow just don't work and it's very frustrating. I just want to install some programs. It's funny too because all the guides made this claim that it's so easy to install programs on linux compared to windows and I am just laughing at how much of a lie that is. I think one of them actually installed some software but not the software I wanted and is probably some malicious program that I don't want and now I don't know how to remove so I am just going to have to reinstall my distro, again *facepalm, and try something else.

Anyway just keeping you up to date on my progress.

P.S. - So the book that lead me to this website also recommended I check out a mailing list they had. Sure enough, I check out the list they talked about in the book and find out it is not even up anymore. Lol. I think I will toss this book, sucks I wasted money on it but little stuff like that just means it's going to be a waste of time. Instead I will try a different book.
 
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Lash540

Guest
I found a video for the chrome install, for some reason every time I go to google chrome's page it only lets me install a 64 bit version which I can't use since i am on a 32 bit linux distro.

P.S. - So apparently Google has discontinued the 32 bit version : / Oh well I guess I will just have to find a good adblock extension for firefox.
 
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Lash540

Guest
So I am searching the extensions for Firefox and no dice. There are a bunch of adblock extensions but these are all the ones nobody wants because they just don't work as well as the adblock from chrome T_T. I guess I am just going to have to use one of those.
 
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Lash540

Guest
So I've installed the adblock extension and I am enjoying using this little netbook to watch videos on youtube while I am just relaxing. Love that this OS has completely revived the little netbook. It's like new. Love it.
 
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Lash540

Guest
I am thinking about putting the SSD back into the netbook.

Question:
Does a Linux OS affect the SSD different than say Windows or Mac OS? Ex. Shorter life span, require special drivers, etc
 
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atanere

Guest
Now that I have an OS installed and working properly on this little machine, wi-fi and all, how do I install applications like Chrome onto my little netbook? Where can I learn how to do this? I've been googling all day and can't seem to find one article that explains how it all works and how it does it. Some of the guides that I tried to follow just don't work and it's very frustrating. I just want to install some programs. It's funny too because all the guides made this claim that it's so easy to install programs on linux compared to windows and I am just laughing at how much of a lie that is.
There are many ways to install new software in Linux, and most really are very easy. Your Xubuntu should have one or both of these tools: Software Manager and Package Manager. Software Manager is a little easier for newbies because it starts you off with some categories that you can browser through. But both managers have a Search Box... type in something and hit enter. For example, search for Chromium (or if you want solitaire, search for aisleriot). Since Google is no longer supporting 32-bit Chrome, you may find that the open source Chromium will work for you. In Software Manager, you just click on the the program you want, and then click the Install button and wait for it to complete, usually very quickly. After installed, if you decide you don't want this program, you can come back to Software Manager, find the program again, and click a Remove button to get rid of it.

Package Manager is a little more tedious, but it isn't bad. Search for Chromium (or something else, maybe Stellarium - an excellent astronomy program). When you find it, I forget if its a left click or right click... right click I think, then tell it "Mark for installation". It will often then pull up a list of other packages... these are dependencies that are needed to make your chosen software work, so you will need to mark them for installation too. After you have done this, there is a button on the top menu (mouse over for a notification to tell you what they are)... you want the one that says "Apply" or "Apply all changes" or something like that. Then it runs, and your program will be installed. Like Software Manager, you can return to Package Manager, find a previously installed program, then right-click on it and choose to Remove it from your system.

But wait, there's more! Xubuntu is based on Ubuntu, which in turn is based on Debian. These use packages that end with a .deb file extension. You may have a tool called "gdebi" installed already, or if not you can install it as described above. Gdebi will install .deb files for you too. Software/Package Managers use software stored in "repositories".... but sometimes you may want something that isn't there, and you may find a .deb file. Double-click on a .deb file and use gdebi to install.

But wait, there's more! Sometimes you can add a non-Ubuntu locations to serve as a repository. These are called "PPA's"... Personal Package Archive, or something like that. You have to add a PPA with a simple command line statement, and then when your Xubuntu updates with Ubuntu, it will also update with the PPA location. Whoever is offering you software in this manner will usually provide the command you can copy and paste into a terminal to setup the PPA. This isn't hard, but not as easy as the Managers. Oh, you'll have to figure out how to "paste" in a command line... there are some different ways, but try using a middle-click if you have that button or scroll wheel. CNTL-V usually works in Linux like it does in Windows, but it often does NOT work in the terminal.

Nope, not done yet, but almost. The old fashioned way is still available too. You can download source code and compile programs from scratch, introducing modifications if you are so inclined. You will have to satisfy dependencies yourself though, and that can be a pain. Its rare these days that you will need to do this so no reason to freak out over it. But some people actually prefer it.

Those are the basics, I think. Someone can call me out if I've made a mistake, or maybe add even more to this list. But your frustration will soon pass as you better learn how Linux works. Good luck!
 
A

atanere

Guest
So I am searching the extensions for Firefox and no dice. There are a bunch of adblock extensions but these are all the ones nobody wants because they just don't work as well as the adblock from chrome T_T. I guess I am just going to have to use one of those.
I run several browsers... because, well, why not? Since Chrome is a problem with your 32-bit CPU, give Chromium a try and see if it will run the ad block extension that you prefer. I use AdBlock Plus on Firefox and it works very well for me. AdBlock Plus will also work in Sea Monkey, a Mozilla variation of Firefox. The Opera browser now has a built-in ad blocker. You might prefer to download the very latest Opera to be sure you get that feature... software repositories are often just a little behind the latest-greatest stuff. Opera provides a .deb file that you can install: http://www.opera.com/download

There are many other browsers too. Some have less features and may be quite a bit faster, such as Midori. If you want text only, try out Lynx. Text only? Sure! Talk about fast load times, without graphics and video plugins!!!

Cheers!
 
A

atanere

Guest
I am thinking about putting the SSD back into the netbook.

Question:
Does a Linux OS affect the SSD different than say Windows or Mac OS? Ex. Shorter life span, require special drivers, etc
This is a good question that I don't see often discussed. I've never owned a SSD so I can't give first-hand experience... but I do think it is something you should look into. Here is just one example: https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/ssd

That link is current and applies to your Xubuntu also, and you can see that it suggests MANY tweaks that you may consider. Of course, it is just one person's opinions and you might find good rebuttal if you search around more on this topic. Maybe more people on this forum can offer you better information as well.
 
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Lash540

Guest
Since Google is no longer supporting 32-bit Chrome, you may find that the open source Chromium will work for you.
I tried this and no dice, the version of chromium has to be on par with what Google chrome has out currently and it can't do that with a 32 bit client anymore since all the app's and extensions are meant for the 64 bit version now because of Chromes lack of support for 32 bit clients.

P.S. -
So for whatever reason now that Chromium has been re-installed through the software manager I was able to install the extension I wanted without issue. :D

I also installed Code Blocks IDE to practice my programming. :D

============


Software Manager and Package Manager.
I've looked through the menus and I can only find a few things...

Software, Software & Updates, and Software Updater. It doesn't look like there is a package manager or anything else installed. Software seems to be the one that mostly resembles something like what you mentioned. It has a few tabs...

All
Installed
Updates

and a Search box with a bunch of featured applications shown on the front page of this app. Ex. Maps, Teeworlds, Artha, Virtual Box, Tux Paint, Clementine, Notes, Geany, etc...

I am assuming this is Xubuntu's Software installer.

Ok so now to add to my question, I've surfed online and found software that works for any linux distro however it requires me to manually install it myself. Can you explain a bit more about the different file types associated with linux and how each one differs?

Ex. . deb, .tzr , etc

Doom the Rouge Like is a perfect example of this type of install. I need all this other software, how would I go about getting it to be able to install Doom RL?

==================

You may have a tool called "gdebi" installed already, or if not you can install it as described above.
No, it doesn't look like it comes pre-installed on this distro. I will pick it up though.

====================

The old fashioned way is still available too. You can download source code and compile programs from scratch, introducing modifications if you are so inclined.
I am not a programmer though I wouldn't know how to do any of that in the least and have never found any good guide explaining how all this works. Lol.

=====================

Is there a book you read that helped you learn about all this Linux stuff?

====================

I am noticing I am having a lot of issues with Xubuntu, it doesn't seem to be working 100% properly.

Ex. I try to deleted unwanted software, Gnome Mines ( something for the example ), from the software manager it has and it just never removes said software. If I try to scroll down to see other software I have installed or just to see the rest of the page, I am also met with the inability to move around. I don't know what is causing this in the least but other than that it seems ok.

=======================

I use AdBlock Plus on Firefox and it works very well for me.
I am doing the same and it seems like they've come along way since I've last used their software. So I am fairly happy with the firefox broswer at this point.

=======================

Some have less features and may be quite a bit faster, such as Midori.
I've tried out this browser before. It was ok, but I don't think I was able to figure out how to implement any form of adblock worth having.


====================

So, after I posted I googled the SSD question in the hopes maybe I might get lucky and find something. Apparently as long as I am not using a swap partition , it doesn't negatively affect the SSD. Why I would run Linux without a Swap is another question entirely. So I am just going to keep the SSD out of the little netbook and leave in 1TB 5400 RPM Cavier Blue WD drive. I will probably donate the SSD , a SAMSUNG 250 GB 850 PRO, to a friend of mine since he has some pretty old hardware and this SSD would really kick things up for him.
 
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Lash540

Guest
So after restarting the Linux PC, it looks like all the apps I uninstalled and installed are where they should be. Hmm. So that was weird but that works so whatever Lol.

But I am still having an issue where I can't fit things on screen properly and I can't scroll to them. I am going to try to use the VGA out to one of my spare monitors to see if it will work great not using the Netbook's screen.
 
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