simple very simple

simple person

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Hello dear Linux users.

I am a simple person, not a tech geek.. I know absolutely nothing about Linux. But am in the process of learning.
Whatever I decide, based on my research both here and online, about the Linux operating system, I will do with the help of my local computer store, and after installation of Linux, i will gladly accept whatever help they can give me by way of tutoring, although i am interested in researching things myself, and so much appreciate being able to go to forums like this one.

does that make sense.? I am just beginning my research on Linux. i am going to go and read the two articles posted at the top of the ' getting started' thread, and will also scroll down.. I am always wanting to do whatever I can do on my own.

That being said, i do not know where to start. All I know is that I want to ditch apple and Mac, and many superfluous things I am using on my Mac now.

I have used open source applications before. Libre office, and several applications, and will be happy to use those applications on my ( ahem) new linux tablet.

I am hoping for a tablet, rather than a small computer.. one of the threads mentioned a tablet sold by walmart, but they appear to be out of stock. I can perhaps purchase through Amazon.
I don't want to spend any more than i need to. I will probably get a laptop or tablet and ask my local computer store to remove windows and install linus.
there was a thread here which was very helpful, instructing a gentleman who had a walmart tablet how to proceed. I was thinking of printing that up for the computer people i will go to.. I hope they are not insulted, but i think you ladies and gentlemen here know far more than the local computer tech knows. even though he agreed to help me.

i just need a computer to type documents, print, and do a bit of e mail ( Thunderbird) and internet search (Firefox). nothing else.
Printer HP and i need to find if that is compatible with Linux OS, and can work wirelessly with it.


I am thinking startpage and startmail. for those applications.( search and e mail)

I am mentioning all these things as I hope I will be able to use them. (compatible with Linux)
Hopefully you will know and can help.
i need a VPN and my present VPN called Express VPN is compatible with UBANTU.. per the internet search.

i am thinking that UBANTU may be the best for beginners.is that true?

Please, I do not want anyone to spend time on things I can search for myself, So please send me to links which you feel appropriate, rather than any kind of lengthy instructions.. but some very direct and relevant links would be much appreciated.

i guess i wanted to introduce myself here at the forum, as it was recommended, and ask you sage people if you think I am on the right track.

thank you
simple
 


70 Tango Charlie

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Greetings @simple person and welcome to the Linux forum.
I'm just the old geezer around here, but may be able to give you encouragement on a couple of your questions.
I personally use Linux Mint. I have found it to be very satisfactory for what I do - email, some office stuff, a little printing, browsing the internet. It is very easy to learn by doing. The latest version is 20.1
You can get it here: https://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=4012
I have an HP printer office jet 3830 that I use wirelessly and it works just fine.
You mentioned that the people on this forum know more than your local tech. That is a true statement. Most computer techs I have met don't know much about Linux so really are a waste of time. These people here do know Linux.
Here's a website that offers free books. https://b-ok.cc/s/linux There is one book I would recommend. It's called 'Linux For Beginners' by Adam Vardy. You can find it on that website.
I have a little Asus laptop that I bought at Walmart for about $240. It works just fine for me.
You don't need a store tech to help you install and use Linux. That is something you will be able to do yourself. It is very simple to do, with a little bit of instruction and help.
You asked if you are on the right track: absolutely you are! Once you have installed and used Linux for a little while, you may never go back to Apple or Windows. I know that I won't.
Once again, welcome and enjoy your stay.
Old Geezer Tango Charlie
 

simple person

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Dear old geezer!! i am in luck .!! I am one of those !!..a fellow old geezer. Been round the block a few times he he..
thank you so much for your thoughtful and informative post.
I will definitely pursue everything you mentioned.
tha king you once again
'nuther old geezer from the cold North.
simple
 

stan

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I am hoping for a tablet, rather than a small computer..
Greetings simple! My first and strongest recommendation is that you get a "regular PC"... a desktop or a laptop. Linux is really designed to run on just a regular pc. While it is possible in some cases to run Linux on a table or a Chromebook, these will usually pose technical hurdles and/or limitations that are not worth the trouble.

It is possible that you can run Linux on the Mac you now have, but likewise, it can be more difficult than is usual with a regular pc. Still, you might give the Mac a test to see if it will boot up on a Linux "live" USB. Or you might try installing VirtualBox or other virtualization software on the Mac and running Linux inside a virtual machine. If you can find success with the Mac, you may not need to buy anything.

If you decide to buy, sometimes the newest-latest-greatest computers have trouble with Linux because drivers may not yet be available for wireless internet, or sound, or other issues. I just bought a new laptop in November and have such a problem. It's easy enough for me to find/fix problems, but these can be very frustrating for new Linux users. So sometimes it can save you both money and trouble if you buy a used or refurbished computer. You might even find a friend/family who might give you an old computer gathering dust in their closet, or get one for next to nothing at a yard sale. Older computers are usually great for Linux if they have enough RAM... 2GB or more is desired, but you can even get by with less, but you might be more limited.

Linux is a fun journey, but don't let it overwhelm you. There are many new things to learn, and it takes time. Linux comes in many "distributions".... and each distribution (or "distro") can also come with different "Desktop Environments" (DE's). Ubuntu (not Ubantu) is a distro, and it is available with many different desktops (XFCE, KDE, LXQt, Budgie, Mate, Gnome). Ubuntu and Linux Mint are both very popular distros for new users, but you'll need to find which desktop appeals to your personal tastes. This is why running a "live" USB (boot on USB and run Linux without installing it) can help you to look at the options you have and which one you decide to install. Running on USB is a little slower than when installed to a hard drive, but it's worth the tradeoff for testing.

Most mainstream distros will have Firefox, Thunderbird, and LibreOffice included already. If not, they are all easily added. Your HP printer should work fine wirelessly, although you may need to connect it by a cable for the first use. I use Express VPN myself, so I know that works with Ubuntu-based distros (I currently use Zorin OS, also good for new users).

Finally, make Google your best friend. And use the Search function here (upper right corner) here or on other forums. Almost any question you may have has been asked before, though it may be difficult to find sometimes. And there are many very smart people here who will be glad to help you.

Good luck!
 

simple person

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you decide to buy, sometimes the newest-latest-greatest computers have trouble with Linux because drivers may not yet be available for wireless internet, or sound, or other issues. I just bought a new laptop in November and have such a problem. It's easy enough for me to find/fix problems, but these can be very frustrating for new Linux users. So sometimes it can save you both money and trouble if you buy a used or refurbished computer. You might even find a friend/family who might give you an old computer gathering dust in their closet, or get one for next to nothing at a yard sale. Older computers are usually great for Linux if they have enough RAM... 2GB or more is desired, but you can even get by with less, but you might be more limited.
THANK YOU! STAN, ! For the helpful information above. And the fact that drivers may not be available for newer laptops for wireless internet( which I will need)

I was also happy to learn that firefox, thunderbird and libreoffice were already installed on many disthis.
Thank you for your kind and informative response.
I am standing on my tippy toes at the waters edge..waiting to take the plunge. But not so sure of my swimming abilities in these areas( usually a good swimmer where computers are concerned..
thanks!
simple
 

stan

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And the fact that drivers may not be available for newer laptops for wireless internet( which I will need)
But don't let me scare you too much either. The wireless problems can sometimes be solved easily, but if not there is another easy way to go... buy a cheap wireless dongle for about $10-$15 that will work with Linux. Often, though, you will find that some distros will make your wireless work (when others will fail). This is very much part of the reason to test out "live" USB versions... to see what works.
 

simple person

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well, i am thinking of installing linux mint. on my olde mac.. I have been having some problems with apple mail and other apple applications, so i was thinking of downloading linux mint and putting it on a USB drive. Can anyone recommend me someone who i can perhaps even pay in some way to help me by phone on the whole process?
i am thinking I have the space to put both Linux Mint and my Apple operating system on my laptop. i dont know the specs of my computer but i can find them easy enough. i think i remember how to do that...ie find how much space i have on here.
so, NEW, SIMPLE, and need help..any suggestions?
 

KGIII

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You should be able to do it yourself. It's truly not hard - especially if you don't want to keep MacOS around.

As it's a Mac, the only major difference I can think of is that most Mac users have to add nomodeset to the boot parameters to get the initial live instance to load. You just need to write the .iso to a USB and then select that during the boot process.

You write it to the USB drive, not just copy it. So, use something like Balena Etcher.

Once there, click the install and then just use the 'erase disk' option during the install and wait a few minutes for it to install. Then you reboot and you're using Mint.

Worst case, check your drive's partitions and make sure you delete them all so that the OS sees the drive as just one partition. Doing it over the phone sounds like more hassle than it's worth - for you. So long as you have a second device, you can look things up along the way and figure it out yourself. It's REALLY easy to install Mint. (Some distros are harder to install, Mint is not one of them. It's all point and click.)
 

70 Tango Charlie

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@simple person @KGIII
I'll second everything that ole Maine-ster just wrote.
It will be real easy - peasy for you. When you get up and running you will look back and see just how easy it was.
Meanwhile, make sure you enjoy the whole experience.
OG TC
 

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