[Solved] Fedora Kernel Freeze on Boot

gingercook

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Hi,

A few days ago, I updated my computer with "sudo dnf update" command but after booting up if I choose the latest version of Fedora from the GRUB menu,
https://i.ibb.co/NsZf9QQ/20210802-201026.jpg

It starts to open and when it comes to the picture down below, it freezes there. If I hit "CTRL+Alt+Delete" then it restarts the computer but it keeps showing the same screen if I keep selecting the latest kernel version.
https://i.ibb.co/qRFzg5K/20210803-174727.jpg

Is there any way to solve this issue?

I use Lenovo Legion Y740

uname -a
Linux myFedora 5.13.5-200.fc34.x86_64 #1 SMP Sun Jul 25 16:19:01 UTC 2021 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux
I also tried the solution discussed in this topic (https://forums.fedoraforum.org/showthread.php?326592-boot-error-after-update)...

sudo dnf reinstall kernel*
But after the restart it did not work.

Here is another info:
rpm -qa kernel
kernel-5.13.4-200.fc34.x86_64
kernel-5.13.5-200.fc34.x86_64
kernel-5.13.6-200.fc34.x86_64
Any idea on how can I solve this? Thanks. As I said, only way for me to see the desktop screen is to choose the second option which is this,

kernel-5.13.5-200.fc34.x86_64
I ran all the commands in this version of the kernel.

Thanks.
 


TheProf

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I have the exact same problem and I am on a custom built pc, something in that kernel or some compatibiltity problem in version 5.13.6-200.fc34.x86_64.

I booted back with the previous kernel and removed the new kernel for now.
 

gingercook

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I have the exact same problem and I am on a custom built pc, something in that kernel or some compatibiltity problem in version 5.13.6-200.fc34.x86_64.

I booted back with the previous kernel and removed the new kernel for now.
What is your graphic card?
Mine is
NVIDIA Corporation TU106BM [GeForce RTX 2070 Mobile / Max-Q]


I also saw this link the same thing discussed.

I removed the latest kernel for now. Let's wait for an update then. Because I have been trying to fix this 3 hours straight and I am done for the day :D.
 

TheProf

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What is your graphic card?
Mine is
NVIDIA Corporation TU106BM [GeForce RTX 2070 Mobile / Max-Q]


I also saw this link the same thing discussed.

I removed the latest kernel for now. Let's wait for an update then. Because I have been trying to fix this 3 hours straight and I am done for the day :D.
I have a 2080 Ti.

I've come across this issue a few days ago actually.. figured I'd wait until a newer version of the kernel is released.
 

gingercook

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I have a 2080 Ti.

I've come across this issue a few days ago actually.. figured I'd wait until a newer version of the kernel is released.
Exactly same for me. Also I removed the kernel and when I do this:

rpm -qa kernel
kernel-5.13.4-200.fc34.x86_64
kernel-5.13.5-200.fc34.x86_64
As you can see it is removed but when I reboot the computer the latest kernel comes installed again. I can still choose 5.13.6 if I want to. How to get rid of it from the boot screen?
 

TheProf

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Exactly same for me. Also I removed the kernel and when I do this:



As you can see it is removed but when I reboot the computer the latest kernel comes installed again. I can still choose 5.13.6 if I want to. How to get rid of it from the boot screen?
I basically ran the following command:
Code:
rpm -qa kernel\* |sort -V
And removed all the 5.13.6 version packages listed with the command above. Usually, when the kernel is installed, there are multiple components, I think you only removed one or two of the packages and so you're still seeing the kernel as an option in GRUB. Try with the command I mentioned, you should see more packages with 5.13.6, remove those.
 

f33dm3bits

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Add the following to /etc/dnf/dnf.conf
Code:
excludepkgs=kernel*
That way next time you update the kernel updates won't be installed and when you want to try to install kernel updates again you can run.
Code:
dnf --disableexcludes=all update kernel*
 

TheProf

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Add the following to /etc/dnf/dnf.conf
Code:
excludepkgs=kernel*
That way next time you update the kernel updates won't be installed and when you want to try to install kernel updates again you can run.
Code:
dnf --disableexcludes=all update kernel*
Thanks for this info! I will keep this in my notes

EDIT: Now that I think about it, this is probably a good configuration to do from the get go of a fresh Linux install. Based on my experience so far, the kernel updates are smooth on Fedora, but not always, like in this case for example. Its probably good to do kernel updates less frequently.

Is there a recommendation as to when the kernel should be updated? For sure if it is going to fix things. But usually, the kernel is not broken to always need updates, is that correct?
 
Last edited:

f33dm3bits

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Thanks for this info! I will keep this in my notes

EDIT: Now that I think about it, this is probably a good configuration to do from the get go of a fresh Linux install. Based on my experience so far, the kernel updates are smooth on Fedora, but not always, like in this case for example. Its probably good to do kernel updates less frequently.

Is there a recommendation as to when the kernel should be updated? For sure if it is going to fix things. But usually, the kernel is not broken to always need updates, is that correct?
It usually depends on yourself and what type of distribution you are running, point of release or rolling distribution. I run rolling release distribution and I update my system about once a day but once a week should be good enough. Although when a patch is released for a security vulnerability it would depend on how fast I install it depending on the risk level, so I always recommend to subscribe to the update mailinglist of your distribution or following update information in some other way so you are up-to-date with what updates are being released.

Just out of interest what would you do differently if you were to do a fresh install compare to how you have it now?
 

TheProf

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It usually depends on yourself and what type of distribution you are running, point of release or rolling distribution. I run rolling release distribution and I update my system about once a day but once a week should be good enough. Although when a patch is released for a security vulnerability it would depend on how fast I install it depending on the risk level, so I always recommend to subscribe to the update mailinglist of your distribution or following update information in some other way so you are up-to-date with what updates are being released.

Just out of interest what would you do differently if you were to do a fresh install compare to how you have it now?
Honestly, not all that much different.

1. Deploy Fedora 34
2. On first boot perform all the updates / reboot
3. Install the NVIDIA drivers
4. Install / Configure some gnome extensions (GNOME is my favorite DE for now)
5. Install all the apps I use (vscode, slack, discord, lutris, steam, wine, games, etc)

I no longer install backup apps like timeshift for example, all my dot configs are in GitLab so I can just pull them on fresh install. Worst comes to worst, I have to reinstall, but it honestly does not take me all that long to set it all up with the dot configs being in GitLab.

I am also working on some bash scripting to try and automate this as much as possible.

My goal is to build a script that I can just use to redeploy everythig on fresh install, but it is a WIP and will probably continually evolve as my configs change.
 

f33dm3bits

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I am also working on some bash scripting to try and automate this as much as possible.

My goal is to build a script that I can just use to redeploy everythig on fresh install, but it is a WIP and will probably continually evolve as my configs change.
Since you are using Fedora, I would work on writing an Ansible playbook for your desktop system configuration setup, so you can run that once your system is installed because of Ansible being a configuration tool, only use shell scripting when absolutely necessary and using standardization tools when possible.
 

TheProf

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Since you are using Fedora, I would work on writing an Ansible playbook for your desktop system configuration setup, so you can run that once your system is installed because of Ansible being a configuration tool, only use shell scripting when absolutely necessary and using standardization tools when possible.
Good idea about Ansible, I did not think about, but for a CM tool, its great from what I hear. Definitely will look into it.
 

gingercook

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Hey guys,

Today there was a new kernel update and it successfully worked on boot.

kernel-5.13.7-200.fc34.x86_64

Thanks for the info guys. I appreciate.[
 
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