[Solved] Linux Mint Mate 21.2 Partitions, BIOS settings

What still is un-clear, please:
while creating the partitions, I give them the names, boot/efi and ´/´ - no - but SWAP, and ´var´ ? Do You understand the (my) trouble ?
No, sorry... I do not understand. I don't think you should be trying to create any partitions (like /var) on your own. I think you should let Mint do the job of creating your partitions. The people who make Mint are much smarter than you and me, and I trust them to make the best choices. When you create partitions during the Linux Mint installation, you select "/" and "/boot/efi" as the mount point... you do not give them these names, Linux Mint names them because these names are standardized and required. There may be some exceptions to this, but they would be very few.


With having to think about new versions of Mint, it would be a good decision, to prepare (and configure) the - /home (?) - partition for settings and additional installed programs with keeping then.
I discourage you from creating a partition for /home, just as I discourage you from creating /var. There are good reasons for making /home a separate partition, and there are good reasons not to do that. The best reason of all is that you are not experienced enough, and you are likely to create problems down the road that neither your (nor we) can foresee.

I've been using Linux for more than 25 years, and I've never used a separate partition for /home, or /var, or /boot. All you need is the "/" partition and "/boot/efi"... that's all. If you will accept just those 2 parttions, you would not need to do the "Something else" type of Mint install, and you could just use the "Erase disk and install Mint" method. I can only recommend that you make your life easy and simple, not hard and complicated.
 
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To repeat from above, I was successful installing the latest Mint, Ubuntu LTS, and Debian into a single / partition... without using /boot/efi. Is my Dell special? I don't know! But it uses GRUB, and if there is not a /boot/efi... then where is the bootloader? Again, I don't know! The /boot/efi folder in Debian was empty (didn't check Mint or Ubuntu). The /boot/grub folder had files/folders, but no grubx64.efi or shimx64.efi bootloader files. Could the booloader files be stored in BIOS itself?

Yes, very confusing. I am booting in UEFI mode, but I wonder if these installs are done in Legacy mode, especially when using msdos partition table. But one Debian install was on GPT and it still installed and worked in a single / partition without /boot/efi. Either way... where is the bootloader? It's as if these distros are creating a "virtual MBR" to put the bootloader and hiding it from normal view. Maybe you or others have more knowledge about how this is accomplished.
@dos2unix... I think I've got this figured out now, and I thought you might be interested. But I don't think it's helpful for the OP.

1. The GRUB bootloader is not stored in BIOS itself. (I didn't think so really.)

2. My BIOS is set for UEFI, and all of the single-partition installations of Debian/Ubuntu/Mint were actually installed in EFI mode, even when installed on 'msdos' partition table (not GPT). I confirmed that these were UEFI installs by the existence of /sys/firmware/efi folder... this folder would not be present for a Legacy installation (MBR). It might be different if I set BIOS to Legacy mode, but I didn't try that.

3. During the single-partition installations on NVMe, the Debian/Ubuntu family of distros found the existing /boot/efi partition on another internal SSD (the one with my current daily driver, MX-Linux, on /dev/sda).... and these test distros added their own bootloaders into folders on that other drive (even though I specifically told the installer to put the bootloader on the NVMe drive, but it didn't). So this is why Gparted only shows the single-partition with the EXT4 installation into "/" on the NVMe, and it does not show "/boot/efi"... because "/boot/efi" is on another physical drive. I get that now, finally. o_O

4. I tried to make a similar single-partition Fedora installation, including both drives during the setup (the NVMe I wanted to install into, plus the other SSD with "/boot/efi").... but I could not seem to make it work that way, perhaps due to my inexperience with Fedora. I was only able to create a working Fedora by adding a new "/boot/efi" partition to the same drive as "/" on the NVMe.

5. I'm quite happy to know that my Dell does not have any unusual superpowers. The Dell BIOS may have some better boot options than other computer brands, but it's not magic after all. ;)
 
OP,

We seem to be going round in circles...forget windowz. You need to learn how Linux works...
2023-10-26-12-05.png

Above is my File System..."Root" As you can see it's all Folders.

Here is a breakdown of everything on my 500GB SSD...
2023-10-26-12-03.png


As I said...I have one Partition created by the Mint installer as shown...you really don't need to do anything except enjoy Linux.
m1212.gif


If you keep things simple...you wont have problems. Burn the ISO to a Flash Drive...Boot to it and click Install...selecting...Erase Disk and Install Linux Mint and the Installer will do the rest...hope this helps.
m1213.gif
 
going round in circles
That´s true.
That comes from not knowing - and not being able to say so -, what exact I do not understand. Or/and what want to understand.
(Has something to do with the partitions and/or just folders ...)
OK.
It also will have something to do with the to me confusing drive-names of Linux.
The topic ´mount´ in addition is a red cloth to me.
The topic UEFI - EFI - is owed to the technical development. Which I just don´t like to be faced with in addition.
This decisions I have to decide are for to make it possible easiest to me. But makes it in the same time more and more impossible, figuring out how.
So, now, I decide - with Your very welcome helps, thank You all - to try the EFI setting in BIOS, do the only one partition - by ´Erase Disk and Install Linux Mint´.
And before all: check very well, that the - from Mint 21 and up - required dual core CPU is there.
 
forget windowz
XP is the last win version I did study - and build - about 5 years, (the same with 98 before), for to have it in my hands instead of it is having me in its hands.
So far (XP) this is still OK for me. But not again.
 
a special BIOS setting to enable if you are going to use a VM
You do not mean this ? Or do You ?
(´VirtualBox BIOS Access´ in https://www.techwalla.com/articles/how-to-get-to-bios-on-virtualbox)

So in VMs only run OSs ? Thank You, this basic.
VM is a "virtual machine".... not a drive or a partition
So not an own partition for it necessary. Because also in a partition it would stay only being a file ?

All you need is the "/" partition and "/boot/efi"... that's all. If you will accept just those 2 parttions, you would not need to do the "Something else" type of Mint install
OK. Thank You.
I slowly ´feel´ I am figuring out my confusions.
For Knoppix install I do have to create two partitions manual. The Swap - never to be to understand for RAM outsourcing, but as just requirement to be able to install at all - and the (then) being named (during the installation) partition ´Knoppix´.
(EFI, UEFI doesn´t seem to be a topic there.)

The installation menu in Mint Mate (´now´) allows an automatic installation or an user self-defined partitions creation.
There - with the ´/´ -option - needs to be assigned thee partition, where Mint Mate is being installed to. (No (partition´s) name here necessary.)
That - ´/´ being reading here - always MEANS just this option, in ´Something else´.
(It later - perhaps - gets a partition name.)

All the list of: /var, /Swap, /home, named parts are so not to mis-interpret as partitions ? More as folders or even just files also. No matter.
I am now off of partitions, for easy. Thank You.
Ah, except of the ´/home´ (partition) for keeping settings and self installed programs, if an update of a new version (Mint Mate) wants to be done ... ?
 
Or is the /home folder, for to keep settings and additional self-installed programs, also enough (instead of own partition), for to keep them, when a newer version will be installed ? Then the most important details should be clear to me. Thank You.
 
You do not mean this ? Or do You ?
(´VirtualBox BIOS Access´ in https://www.techwalla.com/articles/how-to-get-to-bios-on-virtualbox)
No, that's not it. But this is ahead of where you are. You can't have a virtual machine until you have an operating system. Get Linux Mint installed, then make a new thread if you have questions about using VirtualBox or other virtualization methods. When (or if) you ever create a virtual machine, it will store its files in a folder in your /home folder if you use VirtualBox... not in a partition.


There - with the ´/´ -option - needs to be assigned thee partition, where Mint Mate is being installed to. (No (partition´s) name here necessary.)
That - ´/´ being reading here - always MEANS just this option, in ´Something else´.
(It later - perhaps - gets a partition name.)
" / " is the partition name, or maybe it's more correct to say that it will never get any other name. " / " is sometimes called "root" (the root of the filesystem) or "the root partition" or simply "slash." It may be called the "slash partition" or "slash folder" (because it looks like any other folder when you view it from a file manager). It's probably called other things as well. What you call it is not terribly important... but you must have it to install Linux. Linux Mint will create it for you.


All the list of: /var, /Swap, /home, named parts are so not to mis-interpret as partitions ? More as folders or even just files also. No matter.
All folders (except no such thing as /swap). You're right, no matter. Do not bother with them further.


Ah, except of the ´/home´ (partition) for keeping settings and self installed programs, if an update of a new version (Mint Mate) wants to be done ... ?
Let Linux Mint install itself for you. It will not create a /home partition, but it will create a /home folder. It will hold all your important data. When you let Mint upgrade itself, it will not harm your /home files.


Or is the /home folder, for to keep settings and additional self-installed programs, also enough (instead of own partition), for to keep them, when a newer version will be installed ? Then the most important details should be clear to me.
Yes, many settings and configurations are stored in /home. Sometimes some programs may be installed in /home, but not usually. Let Linux Mint (or any other Linux) install software where it wants to put it... and do not worry over where they are stored. If you want to learn backup methods for Linux (and you should, but in another thread)... there are different strategies for how and what to backup. Linux Mint includes a popular program called Timeshift that you should look into as soon as you get Mint installed.
 
then make a new thread
OK. Sorry.
(The folders (and/or) partitions are still being confusing me.)

Linux Mint will create it for you.
OK. Thanks. Partitions I know: with names, at least possible.
(For to talk about, and to have it clear myself in my mind, it is just good to have a well fitting name.
Currently I would name it the OS´s partition.
Whether Mint will give it name, I will see.)

All the list of: /var, /Swap, /home, named parts are so not to mis-interpret as partitions ? More as folders or even just files also. No matter.

All folders (except no such thing as /swap).
All folders ...
Whoop, oops. OK. Thank You very much.

will create a /home folder. It will hold all your important data. When you let Mint upgrade itself
Ah, thank You. Very well. "let mint upgrade": an other topic then.

Sometimes some programs may be installed in /home, but not usually.
Oh, then - for example - browser-settings, favourites: may be all gone, despite a /home folder ?
And the link on the desktop (created) for an extra browser (for example PaleMoon) will also be gone.
OK. thanks, "backup methods for Linux" and "timeshift".
 
Oh, then - for example - browser-settings, favourites: may be all gone, despite a /home folder ?
And the link on the desktop (created) for an extra browser (for example PaleMoon) will also be gone.
Gone? For what reason? An update or upgrade? No... your files are safe in normal operation.

When you install Linux Mint, if you are going to erase Windows, you will need to backup anything on your Windows that you want to keep.

If you later decide to erase Mint and install Windows or another Linux, then you will need to backup anything important on Mint first that you want to keep.

Installing operating systems and manipulating partitions always has some risk of losing data, especially when you are new to doing this. But if you have already saved your important data, then installing Mint with the "Use entire disk" method should be super easy and fast. Mint will set itself up properly.

You do not need to completely understand the Linux filesystem structure tree to install Linux Mint because it will take care of everything for you. But to help you understand better how your Linux will be laid out when you install it, take a look at this page.

When you install Linux Mint, you will create a username for yourself. Then, inside of /home will be a folder with your username... so if your name is visionhelp, it will be /home/visionhelp/. Then inside there will be many more files and folders. Mint will create the other standard folders automatically, so you'll have:
/home/visionhelp/Desktop/
/home/visionhelp/Documents/
/home/visionhelp/Downloads/
/home/visionhelp/Pictures/
and several others
 
But you've got my interest up some more too, and I'll try a few other distros/experiments later today.
Sorry, for now first messaging back:
I did install the Linux Mint Mate (21.2) on EFI partition. (This was the question here, as I do remind correctly.)
The installer works well so far, except of saying (sense similar to) "found EFI, is not to recommend to continue installing, on own risc".
(Sadnessly but no clear explanation.)
But worked all well. (So, this warning is just to ignore.)
But meanwhile deleted it again, for reason(s) I just do not remind, maybe for space to test Win7, which is now already sorted out, for me - as Win 10 also - because (not alone) of (the) VM install troubles.
Next idea is to install Knoppix 9.3, but the CD-version, if there still this exists. With hope the KVE - is this the correct name ? - VM is with in there.
Into there the Linux Mint Mate.
 
Knoppix is very out of date, and I've not found anything else that may be helpful.

You might try asking our AI chatbot, TuxBot... he may can find the info you need.
 
It´s KVM, I think. And it seems not to be built in in Knoppix (also probably in the newest version 9.3).
(I will search the forum for virtualbox in Knoppix. As I found here, it seems it is not included there already as I thought, https://dwaves.de/2014/12/01/linux-knoppix-install-virtualbox/.)
(AI-chat, for me (for my understanding), sorry: no good idea at all: no more talking with humans ... !
Some governments and many municipal authorities administrations will find it very appreciating ..., even the some few democratically based ...)

"out of date", also the newest 9.3 ?)

I think, it was Your question, the Linux Mint Mate installable on EFI ?
Is this question answered to You ?
 
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I did install the Linux Mint Mate (21.2) on EFI partition.
I think, it was Your question, the Linux Mint Mate installable on EFI ?
Is this question answered to You ?
Yes, I do not need to continue.


"out of date", also the newest 9.3 ?
Yes... meaning "not current." That version released June 2022, now almost 2 years ago. And Knoppix does not provide updates, as told here:
Knoppix
  • cannot be upgraded (if you try it, you'll get chaos)
  • offers no updates or security updates
  • has no user management
  • has no password protection
  • is not designed for installation of not Debian packages (compile programs)
  • may cause difficulties while you try to install Debian packages
  • requires experience with aptitude whenever you want to change something

Knoppix is a great tool as a live CD/DVD/USB... but it is not intended to be installed on a computer, even though some have accomplished it. You should carefully read the warning from Knoppix themselves... in English or in German.


AI-chat, for me (for my understanding), sorry: no good idea at all
I am sorry too, but it is very hard for me to follow your conversation also. I had hoped the chatbot would do better than me. Again, I will ask you to visit Google Translate and enter your questions or comments in German, then copy and paste the English translations back to this site. I hope that would help in my understanding, but I am not sure, and I hope that you will try it. Thanks!
 
it is very hard for me to follow your conversation also
Sorry.
My experience speaking in my native language it is not very liked also.
To learn to speak - my german into english - CAN NOT do it better this.
So, for You, to ignore my learning to speak english does not help me, to say my german into english, when I let do the translations with machine.
Easier to me, the one or two points You do not understand quite clear: You just ask, please.
This is what I do.

Oh, making a new "Reply" deletes my already done before answered text.
Wouh, wouh, wouh.
(Oh, sorry, my mistake, had opened it twice (the site), in two tabs, there (in the second; I just forgot) still has been the already made text still. I am very sorry.)

So, I do it now single, sorry, that sets ME up.
 
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meaning "not current."
OK. Bad news, no upgrade, no update. Thanks the info.

But 2 years for me it is still current.
And still always better than any (Win)version after XP.
Stopping to have to serve further Windows at all it does give me time and energy to look for the for me fitting Linux-version.

At most - currently - I would like - want - the Knoppix 9.3 as CD-version, for the little size in compare to the full DVD-size.
But to HD but as the version as CD or on USB. As live so. So not really installed.
And do not have to worry, if to have to receive new hardware.
The reason: the stick can be lost, or corrupt, faster possible than a HD.

But how to integrate KVM (VM) and for example Linux Mint Mate into that VM will be an additional challenge there.
 
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At most - currently - I would like - want - the Knoppix 9.3 as CD-version, for the little size in compare to the full DVD-size.
But to HD but as the version as CD or on USB. As live so. So not really installed.
Running the live CD version of Knoppix 9.3 on a USB stick should work pretty well. It will be faster than running on a CD.


But how to integrate KVM (VM) and for example Linux Mint Mate into that VM will be an additional challenge there.
I don't think you can run a virtual machine if you are using a live Knoppix CD or USB as your running Linux. You need a full installation (Linux or Windows) to run the host software (KVM or VirtualBox)... and you have to share your CPU and RAM with the virtual machine guest operating systems so both can run at the same time.

You need a fair amount of resources to comfortably run a virtual machine. I have tried virtual machines with only 8 GB of RAM (4 GB for the host, and 4 GB for the guest)... and I don't feel that's enough. It worked, but sluggish.

Besides Knoppix, you could just run other Linux distros on live USB drives to learn more about them. You don't need any OS installed on the hard drive... you don't need a hard drive at all. All of the Linux Mint versions are excellent: Cinnamon, MATE, and XFCE. MX-Linux is also a very good choice for new users. You might look at openSUSE Linux too... as its parent, SUSE Linux, is a German company, and you might find more native speakers to help you with that distro.
 
It will be faster than running on a CD.
Sorry, I think the same (the live) on SSD is faster than from USB, no ?

live CD version of Knoppix 9.3 on a USB stick
You know, it still exists, the CD-version ?

have to share your CPU and RAM with the virtual machine
So far I understand it already. Thanks.

with only 8 GB of RAM
Perhaps wrong reminding a fast reading: for Linux Mint Mate could be enough about 1 GB RAM. Worth a test.
But the most sayings recommend - 8 or/and - 16 GB RAM at least.

You don't need any OS installed on the hard drive
Sorry the need to mention it again:
I want to install the - for example - Linux 9.3 CD-version AS the CD-version instead of onto USB-stick to a harddrive.

And perhaps for VM - VirtualBox - I have to ... ?

might look at openSUSE Linux too
Thank You. But now just overwhelming already ´Tumbleweed´ and ´Leap´.
VM currently stays challenging still enough.
 
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Sorry, I think the same (the live) on SSD is faster than from USB, no ?
Yes, faster. By all means use an SSD.


You know, it still exists, the CD-version ?
I want to install the - for example - Linux 9.3 CD-version AS the CD-version instead of onto USB-stick to a harddrive.
I don't think I can help you to install Knoppix to a hard drive (SSD). Maybe someone else can assist with that... or you can find info with Google search.

Wikipedia has a list of Knoppix versions that indicates you need Knoppix 9.1 if you insist on the CD-size version of Knoppix. Both CD and DVD versions of 9.1 can be downloaded from these mirrors. I see that QEMU is available in the package list for the DVD version, but I don't think it is in the smaller CD version. So you may be able to use a virtual machine in Knoppix after all... if you use the DVD version. I don't use QEMU/KVM myself though, so I won't be able to help you with that either.

The newer Knoppix versions, 9.2 and 9.3, were released as DELUG-DVD only, in German language only. And they seem to be only available in Germany via the Linux Magazin. There is an English announcement for version 9.2, and a German announcement for version 9.3, but no download links that I saw.

If you have access to version 9.3, it would be better because it is newer and will be better patched for security problems. And you may prefer the DVD size to get access to QEMU. Your decisions.
 
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