[SOLVED] Random Full System Crashes on Arch Installation :(

f33dm3bits

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So something like this.
Bash:
#!/bin/bash

if [[ ! -d $HOME/dmesg_output ]]
then
    mkdir -p $HOME/dmesg_output
fi

minutes=180

until [[ minutes -eq 0 ]]
do
    sudo dmesg > $HOME/dmesg_output/$(date +%R%S-%F)-dmesg.txt
    minutes=$(($minutes - 1))
    echo $minutes
    sleep 60
done
You can adjust the minutes variable to for how many minutes you want it to create log files for, it then counts down from there and temporarily configure sudo to not ask for your password and then run it from your user shell or create a cronjob to make start at time X. Then afterwards you screen crashes/freezes and you reboot your machine you will have a directory with dmesg files with a date and timestamp, then go through the file with the correct timestamp from around when your screen crash/freeze occurred.
 
Last edited:


Tolkem

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I'm running the linux-tls + nvidia-lts and I'm now using both GPU's.
Have you checked Arch's wiki? It's the first place you should look at:

For instance, in the troubleshooting article:
Crashing in general

  • Try disabling RenderAccel in xorg.conf.
  • If Xorg outputs an error about "conflicting memory type" or "failed to allocate primary buffer: out of memory", or crashes with a "Signal 11" while using nvidia-96xx drivers, add nopat to your kernel parameters.
  • If the NVIDIA compiler complains about different versions of GCC between the current one and the one used for compiling the kernel, add in /etc/profile:
export IGNORE_CC_MISMATCH=1


  • If Xorg is crashing , try disabling PAT. Pass the argument nopat to kernel parameters.

More information about troubleshooting the driver can be found in the NVIDIA forums.
 

f33dm3bits

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There wasn't any evidence in OP's logs or journal about crashing so I more likely suspect maybe a hardware problem, but OP hasn't tried one of my suggestions. Which using a usb drive to live boot into another distribution and let the system run to see if the problem occurs than as well but I suspect they are waiting on the SSD with Windows that support sent OP and then to try the same thing there as I suggested to to with live booting another distribution.
 

Puffer Man

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There wasn't any evidence in OP's logs or journal about crashing so I more likely suspect maybe a hardware problem, but OP hasn't tried one of my suggestions. Which using a usb drive to live boot into another distribution and let the system run to see if the problem occurs than as well but I suspect they are waiting on the SSD with Windows that support sent OP and then to try the same thing there as I suggested to to with live booting another distribution.
Yes! Finally had some time... Let me tell ya, you don't want to be a teacher at the beginning/final of the year, that's for sure.

I'm indeed waiting for the SSD. I talked about booting from an USB with the support, and they said its not the same as a SSD/HDD. I'll see if I have time to backup my /home and try out other distribution on this weekend.
 

f33dm3bits

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Yes! Finally had some time... Let me tell ya, you don't want to be a teacher at the beginning/final of the year, that's for sure.

I'm indeed waiting for the SSD. I talked about booting from an USB with the support, and they said its not the same as a SSD/HDD. I'll see if I have time to backup my /home and try out other distribution on this weekend.
Don't give up yet on having Arch on your laptop! The point of booting from a different distribution in a live environment was to see how your graphics reacts during the live boot, if results in the same crashes it will verify that hardware issue but if it's a hardware issue would also expect Windows to react strangle to it. After you verify if it's not a hardware issue I would just try to reinstall Arch, stick with the distribution you love and if it's a hardware issue then you know the problem wasn't your install.
 

Tolkem

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if it's a hardware issue would also expect Windows to react strangle to it.
Not necessarily, sadly and unfortunately, Windows do have better support for graphics when using the proprietary drivers, so in case it is a graphics issue, which it's possible given the history of Nvidia-Linux on that matter and looking at that screenshot in post #12 it might as well be the case, it is possible that the issue doesn't occur in Windows. I would try an arch-based distro in a Live USB to see whether it happens or not

It was the first thing I tried. After running out of resources in there, I went straight to the Arch forum.
Good. Well, I have to ask :)
.
 

Puffer Man

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Don't give up yet on having Arch on your laptop! The point of booting from a different distribution in a live environment was to see how your graphics reacts during the live boot, if results in the same crashes it will verify that hardware issue but if it's a hardware issue would also expect Windows to react strangle to it. After you verify if it's not a hardware issue I would just try to reinstall Arch, stick with the distribution you love and if it's a hardware issue then you know the problem wasn't your install.
Who said give up? I’m not going to give up. I’m going to try other distributions, that’s why I’ll back up my /home, so my .conf files will be saved. I’ll try PopOs! first, heard their graphics support is good.
 

f33dm3bits

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Who said give up? I’m not going to give up. I’m going to try other distributions, that’s why I’ll back up my /home, so my .conf files will be saved. I’ll try PopOs! first, heard their graphics support is good.
It sounded like, I'm glad I assumption was wrong! If try another distribution try another Arch based distribution like @Tolkem already mention, but one that is known to be close to Arch like Endeavouros or Arco.

So in case it is a graphics issue, which it's possible given the history of Nvidia-Linux on that matter and looking at that screenshot in post #12 it might as well be the case, it is possible that the issue doesn't occur in Windows. I would try an arch-based distro in a Live USB to see whether it happens or not
My previous laptop had a RTX 2060 in it that ran fine on Arch with the nvidia driver, so kind of hoping for @Puffer Man that it's some kind of hardware issue whether the nvidia card or another hardware component, on the other hand since the issue remained when the nvidia card was disabled it's hard to tell without having seen how the system reacts when booted into another Arch based distribution or Windows.
 

Puffer Man

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Good night everyone.

The SSD is here and already on the run. I'm sending this message from W10, I just arrived from work. Haven't experienced any crashes yet. I'll be making the heavy experiments tomorrow, just passed by to say I'm still alive!
 

Puffer Man

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Hello.

So I've been using W10 for a while and some weird stuff happen:
First the screen would go black for some time and them come back shortly after. Looking over this ''reliability history" I found out this critical event: 'GCUBridge stopped working'.
When clicking on 'exhibit details', it says to have issues with the file path (GCUBridge.exe). The timestamps of the errors match with the time that I had the black screens. After some fast research over this issue I saw some people suffering crashes due to it.

I still don't know the use of such software nor if this is the cause of the problem, anyway, I thought it was worth mentioning.
 

f33dm3bits

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I'm not a a hardware export but that is odd similar to the screen crashes you were having on Arch except for that with Windows the screen blacks out for a bit and then comes back on. Is are the screen blackouts with the same randomness that the screen crashes were on Arch?
 

Puffer Man

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I'm not a a hardware export but that is odd similar to the screen crashes you were having on Arch except for that with Windows the screen blacks out for a bit and then comes back on. Is are the screen blackouts with the same randomness that the screen crashes were on Arch?
Both happen with the same frequency. The only difference is that on Windows stuff come back to work, while on Linux they just stop.
 

f33dm3bits

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Both happen with the same frequency. The only difference is that on Windows stuff come back to work, while on Linux they just stop.
That doesn't sound like a coincidence then. Is there anyway you could send your laptop for a hardware checkup to the store where you bought it and if they find something that they can fix it for you? I would think that you still have product guarantee if it's within a year of when you bought the laptop depending on what country you live in. That's the only advice I have left since hardware isn't my thing and it doesn't sound like a software issue if a similar thing is happening on Windows. It would be interesting to see what would happen with another Linux distribution(Arch based) running on it with Nvidia drivers to see if you get the same screen crashes as you do with Arch.
 

Puffer Man

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That doesn't sound like a coincidence then. Is there anyway you could send your laptop for a hardware checkup to the store where you bought it and if they find something that they can fix it for you? I would think that you still have product guarantee if it's within a year of when you bought the laptop depending on what country you live in. That's the only advice I have left since hardware isn't my thing and it doesn't sound like a software issue if a similar thing is happening on Windows. It would be interesting to see what would happen with another Linux distribution(Arch based) running on it with Nvidia drivers to see if you get the same screen crashes as you do with Arch.
Yes I could send my laptop for them to take a look, however I'll wait a little bit more. I'll give a whole week for testing and see if I'm forced to hard reboot or not. Because if Windows can recover, why can't Linux? I also need to try other arch-base distribution as you said.
 

f33dm3bits

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Because if Windows can recover, why can't Linux?
Maybe the Nvidia drivers react differently under Linux than under Windows and therefore causing different reactions in the OS. I've always heard and read a lot of people having problems with Nvidia drivers under Linux although I've never experienced any problems myself. Although it would still be interesting to see if you get any useful information from dmesg during a screen crash under Arch if you used that script I to get the output during a crash which I post earlier in this topic.
 

Puffer Man

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Maybe the Nvidia drivers react differently under Linux than under Windows and therefore causing different reactions in the OS. I've always heard and read a lot of people having problems with Nvidia drivers under Linux although I've never experienced any problems myself. Although it would still be interesting to see if you get any useful information from dmesg during a screen crash under Arch if you used that script I to get the output during a crash which I post earlier in this topic.
Another behavior that I noticed is the fans' noise. On Windows the fans' noise is way louder than they were under Linux. When thinking about it I remember that I use the thermald daemon to control the temperature. Could this have something to do with the issue?
 
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