(Steam) Using proton on a native Linux port completely nukes a game!

BigBadBeef

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Something is going on in the background that I am not familiar with. We can be in agreement that some Native Linux ports are so bad that using Proton is preferable.

But this is where it all goes wrong. Using proton on a native Linux game in steam causes it to fail spectacularly! Not only will it fail to install all the prerequisite files for a successful proton launch, it will get completely stuck at some point in the process and will be unable to go past it.

After that the REALLY bad part comes in - switching back to native Linux mode causes the game to fail to run completely, no error messages provided. As soon as you click that "Play" button, it is as if nothing has happened. I momentarily see a cloud sync message, but then it goes right back to the point before I wanted to play the game.

Deleting it's associated "Compadata" subfolder doesn't help, neither does checking the integrity of the game files.

EVEN completely uninstalling the game and downloading it all over again doesn't fix the issue.

Obviously some files or settings have been left behind that are screwing with the game's ability to launch successfully, but where are they? And what am I missing?
 


run arch and go to aur and make package gamescope-session-git, that is a full fat steamdeck os and just enable steam play in compatibility and set it to experimental and most all games will just work
 
I can see why the admins sent you on an "unpaid vacation". You're just posting for the sake of posting and are paying as much attention to any OP's texts as a squirrel does when high on coffee.
 
Hello "BigBadBeef",

Your post resonates with a pain point that many Linux gamers have encountered at some juncture, and I truly empathize with the frustrations you've shared. The unpredictability of how certain games interact with Proton, especially when they have a native Linux port, can be a significant challenge.

I've also ventured into the realm of using Wine, particularly version 8.15, for a majority of my games. It's been a reliable solution for me in many instances. Like you, I've found that some games, notably CS:GO, can be rather finicky when trying to get them to run through Wine.

However, the core issue you've highlighted regarding the challenges of toggling between Proton and native Linux mode in Steam is concerning. It's perplexing how even a complete game uninstallation doesn't seem to rectify the problem. It makes one wonder if there are residual configurations or settings left behind in hidden directories or if there's a deeper underlying issue with how Steam manages these transitions.

"I-hate-Windows" suggested a particular approach involving Arch and the AUR package gamescope-session-git. While it's always enlightening to explore new potential solutions, I believe it's equally crucial to ensure that such suggestions align closely with the original concern. Diving deep into the intricacies of each game's interactions with Proton and native Linux ports might be the key to understanding and hopefully resolving this issue.

In summary, I genuinely hope that the Linux gaming community, with its collaborative spirit and vast collective experience, can provide insights and solutions to the challenges you've highlighted. We're all in this journey together, and I'm optimistic that with continued dialogue and experimentation, we can enhance the Linux gaming experience for everyone.

Best wishes,
Kiba Snowpaw
 
Hi kiba, long time no see!

I tried to do the same thing with another natively Linux supported game, and it nuked that one as well! So we can confirm that steam is indeed reponsible. I simply stopped at this point as I was well on the way of wrecking my entire steam library of natively supported titles.

And what made me extremely angry is the fact Valve has their technical support set up so that they refuse to even contemplate that they may be at fault. Fine have it your way -REFUND!

So I went the old fashioned way - the game was a native Linux game, so installing it was an easy shell script, so I bought the GOG version. Well guess what? IT WORKS! And it works perfectly! Shocking, IKR?

So I kept digging. Eventually I came to the point to realize what the problem was. Turns out that with the all the proton versions to choose from, both custom and defaults, the native Linux runtime option is RIGHT IN THE BOTTOM!

Yeah, not only does disabling the "compatibility mode" default to the last selected proton version, if you want to revert back to the native launcher, you have to go down ALL THE WAY to the bottom of the list of all proton versions and select "steam linux runtime", wait for it to re-download practically half the game. When that's done, only then you can disable compatibility mode.

Of course on top of that, it fails to install all prerequisites under any version of proton. So I'm not sorry I refunded. But in all fairness, it was the only time steam has failed me. Its only ironic it did so only for native linux titles.
 
Hi kiba, long time no see!

I tried to do the same thing with another natively Linux supported game, and it nuked that one as well! So we can confirm that steam is indeed reponsible. I simply stopped at this point as I was well on the way of wrecking my entire steam library of natively supported titles.

And what made me extremely angry is the fact Valve has their technical support set up so that they refuse to even contemplate that they may be at fault. Fine have it your way -REFUND!

So I went the old fashioned way - the game was a native Linux game, so installing it was an easy shell script, so I bought the GOG version. Well guess what? IT WORKS! And it works perfectly! Shocking, IKR?

So I kept digging. Eventually I came to the point to realize what the problem was. Turns out that with the all the proton versions to choose from, both custom and defaults, the native Linux runtime option is RIGHT IN THE BOTTOM!

Yeah, not only does disabling the "compatibility mode" default to the last selected proton version, if you want to revert back to the native launcher, you have to go down ALL THE WAY to the bottom of the list of all proton versions and select "steam linux runtime", wait for it to re-download practically half the game. When that's done, only then you can disable compatibility mode.

Of course on top of that, it fails to install all prerequisites under any version of proton. So I'm not sorry I refunded. But in all fairness, it was the only time steam has failed me. Its only ironic it did so only for native linux titles.
I've stopped using Proton entirely; now, I rely on Wine 8.15 for all my gaming needs. Have you tried Wine? I've found that it often performs better than many native Linux games I've played. I only revert to native games when Wine doesn't deliver the desired performance, or when a game runs better with the native Steam client. Interestingly, GOG games tend to fare better in terms of native Linux compatibility. For instance, I have a game that doesn't work on Steam's Linux version


but runs perfectly on GOG. This is because the GOG version supports the native Linux .Sh file, while the Steam version doesn't, at least from what I recall.

 
I have nothing against proton, this was the first time it failed me, but only for a native Linux game. Yes I have used wine before. Its performance and compatibility in comparison to proton is varied from game to game. Its better in some, worse in others.
 
I have nothing against proton, this was the first time it failed me, but only for a native Linux game. Yes I have used wine before. Its performance and compatibility in comparison to proton is varied from game to game. Its better in some, worse in others.
Personally, I find it more straightforward to run games using Wine. Moreover, installing programs like WMP (Windows Media Player) using Winetricks seems easier in Wine. This is particularly true since some Linux operating systems don't come with Protontrick pre-installed. For those unfamiliar, Protontrick is a tool designed to help with game installations on Linux, especially for those using Steam Proton. If it's not already installed, you'll need to set it up first. However, that's just my personal perspective.

Additionally, Wine offers the convenience of allowing game installations from physical discs. Over the years, I've played several games this way, including "Call of Duty® 2". I even made a video about it about a year ago.


If I recall correctly, I was using Wine version 7.x at that time. Having now tried the newer 8.15 version, I feel it's even better. I've only experimented with a few games so far, but the results have been promising.

Furthermore, Wine supports OpenGL, but this is dependent on the game engine having built-in OpenGL support. Specifically, I've played a few VNGs (Visual Novel Games) that utilize OpenGL in Wine. To clarify, OpenGL is a cross-platform graphics API that allows for complex graphics rendering in games and applications. From my experience, only those particular games have been able to work seamlessly with OpenGL within the Wine environment.
 
Yeah,
and then there is this:
 
Graphics aren't the sole determinant of a game's quality. I'm a fervent supporter of indie games, having backed 46 projects on Kickstarter since November 2016. And that doesn't even touch upon the thousands of dollars I've invested in games on Patreon over the years. With my support, games like "LITTLE LEGEND", "Caffeine: Victoria's Legacy", "Cafe Crush", "Silent Voices", and "Angel with Scaly Wings" have come to fruition.


For clarity, when we talk about "Triple-A" games, we're referring to high-budget games produced by major studios. These games often have large development and promotional budgets and are expected to sell millions of copies.

I've grown increasingly disenchanted with many Triple-A games because I believe they've strayed from what truly makes a game enjoyable and memorable. On my main Steam account alone.


I boast a collection of over 2000 games, and I've delved into the vast majority of them. If presented with the choice of spending $80 on one Triple-A title or securing 5 compelling indie games, I'd undoubtedly opt for the indie selection.

A prime example of my inclination towards indie titles is "Retro Pixel-Art Mystery Adventure: Mercury Abbey", a project I've proudly backed on Kickstarter. I was enamored with the demo, and I'd highly recommend giving it a look on Steam. It's a 2D pixel-art graphic puzzle game. This title stands as a testament to the idea that indie games, even those embracing a retro graphic style, can outshine Triple-A games that flaunt cutting-edge graphics.


The broader point here is that while Triple-A games often dazzle with their visuals, they can sometimes lack the heart, creativity, and innovation commonly found in indie titles. Indie developers frequently pour their passion and vision into their projects, resulting in games that resonate on a deeper, more personal level with players. The essence of a great game isn't just in its visual presentation, but in its storytelling, gameplay mechanics, and the emotional experiences it offers.
 
I share your dissapointment with the AAA section. I was of this oppinion even prior switching to windows, and had a lot of indie games in my posession.

Imagine my surprise that most of them had native Linux support. From simple shell script installers to lutris install scripts, it all ran perfectly fine!

The only thing that bothered me for a while was to run them since many didn't even have an executable, but once I got used to the fact that it was different on a case by case basis, I managed just fine.

But unfortunately, It is not simplified enough that you couldn't recommend a beginner to go for anything outside of steam or lutris or any other purpose launchers.
 
The only thing that bothered me for a while was to run them since many didn't even have an executable, but once I got used to the fact that it was different on a case by case basis, I managed just fine.
Many of games the game i downloaded from GOG, is designed for Linux, and come with .sh files. For those unfamiliar, an .sh file is a shell script typically used to automate the execution of commands in Linux. It's akin to the .exe files on Windows. To play a game using these files, you often use technologies like OpenGL.

OpenGL, which stands for Open Graphics Library, is a cross-platform API (Application Programming Interface) used for rendering 2D and 3D vector graphics. In simple terms, it allows games and applications to communicate with your computer's graphics hardware, ensuring that visual elements are displayed correctly and efficiently.

To run a game using the .sh file in Lutris (a gaming platform for Linux):

  1. First, ensure the .sh file is marked as executable. You can usually do this by right-clicking on the file, selecting properties, and then checking the option to "Run as a program" or a similar setting.
  2. Once that's done, open Lutris and use the option to run the .sh file as a Linux program.
By doing this, you should be able to play the game. However, always make sure you trust the source of your .sh files before executing them, as running malicious scripts can harm your system.
 
My apologies for replying to an older thread, but I felt I needed to add a little bit, since there's some misinformation/misunderstanding happening.

When you install a game via Steam that has a native client, it'll pull that native client by default. When you enable Proton, it switches to the Windows depot for that game if one exists (I don't know of any games without a Windows release on Steam), but it won't always recheck/redownload, so you'll end up trying to launch the native Linux version via Proton, which dies terribly. Sometimes it will check/download some but not all of the depot, so it'll work somewhat, but have problems.

Whenever I switch any game from the native version to a Windows one (for example, DOW2 Retribution, because the Linux client can't crossplay with the Windows build), I will then trigger the recheck/redownload via Properties -> Local Files. Once that finishes, you'll have the proper Windows depot for the game and it should run. If you swap back, by turning off Proton for that game, you should recheck/redownload again, so that it pulls the native Linux depot again.

For some games, this may pull a lot of data and be rather wasteful (some games with certain Bink FMVs download transcoded versions to play more smoothly under the Linux depot, for an example), so you generally don't want to do this often, but it does work, and I'm sorry you ran into some bugs with the process. Best of luck and enjoy.
 
I recently did come across a game where I was using the Linux native port and wasn't able to play online with my friends, I kept looking around and finally I figured out the Linux native port was so old and far behind that it made it impossible to play online with the Windows version. So I then switched to the Proton version, I immediately saw the different and it fixed the problem because I was able to play with my friends online. I had this with Borderlands 2.
 
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Its unfortunate that it doesn't follow a predictable pattern when resolving the issue, you have to deal with each one on a case by case basis.
 
I recently did come across a game where I was using the Linux native port and wasn't able to play online with my friends, I kept looking around and finally I figured out the Linux native port was so old and far behind that it made it impossible to play online with the Windows version. So I then switched to the Proton version, I immediately saw the different and it fixed the problem because I was able to play with my friends online. I had this with Borderlands 2.
Aspyr, Feral, and a few other porting houses keep doing this. They have good intentions, but either the contract runs out and they stop updating, while the first-party Windows client keeps moving, like BL2, or they end up forking off a "dead" game and making Windows final version 25050 and Linux and Mac are on 25052, with no matching Windows update ever coming, like DOW2 or COD: Black Ops 3, or crossplay comes and goes, like Civilization VI and Star Wars Jedi Academy.

This isn't a Linux problem. This isn't a game problem. This isn't a Steam problem (tons of Steam titles have multi-platform and crossplay on Steam), it's mostly an Aspyr/Feral/contract problem.
 

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