Superuser privileges

newtolinux

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How do you get superuser privileges in Linux? I have updates that I can't download and install because I don't have superuser privileges. One download asks me to manually run 'dpkg --configure -a' to correct the problem. I type it into terminal and it says I don't have superuser privileges. What can I do to correct the problem?
 


newtolinux

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Ummm, never mind. I just ran the updates again, and they downloaded and installed with no problem. I don't know what I did but the updates installed. I'm still new to Linux and haven't really played around with it much to know the ins and outs of it without destroying everything I have set up or having to re-install it. :)
 

captain-sensible

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what distro are you using ? See if you have Timeshift , a lot on here swear by it. I don't have that option so have to be extra cautious with mine.
 

wizardfromoz

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jglen490

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Just for grins, and not to stomp on anyone else's advice, with Mint (as well as all the *buntu distro), updates are easy on the CLI by running:
Code:
sudo apt update
     followed by
sudo apt full-upgrade
 

newtolinux

New Member
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157
Hi guys! I'm getting the same message again when I try to install updates: manually run 'dpkg --configure -a'. What am I doing wrong? I have superuser privileges because that was the message I got with the prior update message telling me I need those privileges.
 

wizardfromoz

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@newtolinux - just to be clear again... did you enter

Code:
dpkg --configure -a

OR

sudo dpkg --configure -a
?

It should be the latter.

Wiz
 

jglen490

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Please remember. Elevated permissions are what the name implies. Permissions that are not normally required, but are needed when it is necessary to make basic changes to the OS and certain applications.

For most Linux distros, using sudo in front of a command will result in elevated permissions after entering your password. Some distros still require a separate root account and separate password. They both work, but there are advantages to sudo.
 

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