System Monitor

Adrian1980

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My first post here.

I’m the only user of a home-office desktop.

In the system monitor I can see the following processes:

csd-power
csd-orientation
csd-wacom

I can right click them and kill the process but in the next restart, they there are again.

Is ther’s any way to permanently kill them and don’t let them appear in the next reboot?

Thanks in advance!

Linux Mint 20.2 Cinnamon
 


Condobloke

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G'day Adrian, Welcome to Linux.org

No luck over at linuxmint.com?

Rocky Bennett is a cautious soul....and usually errs on the side of caution.

I do not know the answer to your question (can you kill them permanently etc)....outside my field of knowledge, but for certain some other bright soul from here will provide you with a definitive answer.
 

f33dm3bits

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Those are processes used by the Cinnamon desktop environment to handle power-management, so killing them isn't going to do anything. You would need to disable them from starting in your users desktop session somewhere if that is even possible but looking at the documentation and at the Cinnamon settings in a vm it doesn't look like it's possible. I also tried remove the package cinnamon-settings-daemon from my installation and that remove the whole cinnamon desktop environment. So in short it's not possible.
 
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Adrian1980

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G'day Adrian, Welcome to Linux.org

No luck over at linuxmint.com?

Rocky Bennett is a cautious soul....and usually errs on the side of caution.

I do not know the answer to your question (can you kill them permanently etc)....outside my field of knowledge, but for certain some other bright soul from here will provide you with a definitive answer.
Hey bro!

Sure, I know.

I guess my need is not a very common one but it worth the try.
 

Condobloke

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The answer above your post by f33dm3bits is worth paying attention to. That is a definitive answer I was referring to.

He is rarely (if ever) wrong.

Is there any particular reason they have to be removed......or is this just something you want to try?
 

Adrian1980

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Those are processes used by the Cinnamon desktop environment to handle power-management, so killing them isn't going to do anything. You would need to disable them from starting in your users desktop session somewhere if that is even possible but looking at the documentation and at the Cinnamon settings in a vm it doesn't look like it's possible. I also tried remove the package cinnamon-settings-daemon from my installation and that remove the whole cinnamon desktop environment. So in short it's not possible.
Thanks for your answer and for your time in the VM.

By temporarily killing a hand full of these processes, I was able to free up 90-100MB of RAM.

Every time I turn on the PC I manually kill those processes as proof of concept and I can't be 100% sure if something was broke, but nothing sees broke so far.

You said "You would need to disable them from starting in your users desktop session somewhere"

Any clue where that can be?

I understand that I can broke my OS and restore it via TimeShift or install it again if it's needed.
I'm fully responsible of my actions.

Thanks!
 

Adrian1980

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The answer above your post by f33dm3bits is worth paying attention to. That is a definitive answer I was referring to.

He is rarely (if ever) wrong.

Is there any particular reason they have to be removed......or is this just something you want to try?
Well, to be honest, these are just experiments that I like to do.

Not that I have a real need to save that RAM but by doing those experiments I gain some experience as a Linux user.

A fresh Linux Mint instalation use arround 1.2 gigs of RAM and by freeing some of that memory makes me feel that I won some experience.
 

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sam444

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Well, to be honest, these are just experiments that I like to do.

Not that I have a real need to save that RAM but by doing those experiments I gain some experience as a Linux user.
System Monitor Processes are there for a very good reason and should be left alone.

These experiments you like to do could result in your next thread entitled "My computer wont Boot...Why ?

Back in the dark days of windoze where you had to stop System Processes, in some cases to improve things and a few other reasons but this is Linux and totally unnecessary...as we say Linux isn't windoze.
 

f33dm3bits

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Please read what I wrote but the answer is no you can't disable it.
looking at the documentation and at the Cinnamon settings in a vm it doesn't look like it's possible. I also tried remove the package cinnamon-settings-daemon from my installation and that remove the whole cinnamon desktop environment. So in short it's not possible.
If you need a desktop environment that takes less resources have a look at Xfce4.
 

Condobloke

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Performance and responsiveness
The cinnamon desktop performance has improved from the past releases but without an SSD you can feel a bit sluggish. The last time I used cinnamon desktop was in version 4.4.8, the There isRAM consumption right after boot was around 750mb. a huge improvement in the current version 4.8.6, reduced by 100 MB after boot.

Performance and responsiveness
MATE
desktop has a reputation of its lightweight nature and there is no doubt about that. Compared to Cinnamon desktop, the CPU usage always remains a bit lower, and this can be translated to a better battery life on a laptop.

Although it doesn’t feel as snappy as Xfce (in my opinion), but not to an extent to compromise user experience. RAM consumption starts under 500 MB which is impressive for a feature rich desktop environment.

XFCE
At the first boot the ram usage is similar to MATE desktop but not quite as good. If your computer isn’t equipped with an SSD, Xfce desktop environment can resurrect your system.

Linux Mint 20.2
System requirements:
1GB RAM (2GB recommended for a comfortable usage)

LM20.2 also has the ability to dial back the ram usage

Performance and resource usage
5 memory leaks were fixed in Cinnamon 5 and a new monitor was implemented to detect, log and tackle cases where Cinnamon takes too much memory.

Using the system settings you can now limit the maximum amount of RAM Cinnamon can use:


Memory limit in Cinnamon 5.0
If that maximum amount is reached Cinnamon will restart itself. You won't lose your session or your windows, Cinnamon will just be unresponsive for about a second while it restarts itself internally. It will keep a log of such events so that you can see if this happens often and help the development team troubleshoot the issue.

The Cinnamon screensaver daemon used to run constantly in the background. In Cinnamon 5.0 it now only runs on-demand when the screensaver needs to be activated. This results in a net minimum gain of about 20MB RAM on lean specs and up to a few hundred MB of RAM on some computers.

Although it's technically more akin to a code change and not a resource usage optimization, the response time for quickly switching between two applications using Alt+Tab was improved, giving the impression of a snappier desktop environment.
 

Condobloke

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How many cores does your processor have ??
 

Adrian1980

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Thanks all for your time and answers.

I found how to achieve it.

I enter in the console:

# locate csd-wacom

And found that those files are located in /usr/libexec

Rename them as super user and they are no longer a process in the System Monitor.

Free arround 100MB of RAM.

I will test my OS the next weeks but everything looks fine so far after 3 reboots.

Edit: I wrote 800MB by mistake, now is fixed.
 
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f33dm3bits

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That's not a solution but an ugly hack and it will cause errors in your syslog.
Jul 12 07:35:35 mint cinnamon-session[1066]: WARNING: t+0,12936s: Failed to start app: Unable to start application: Failed to execute child process “csd-wacom” (No such file or directory)
Next time cinnamon-settings-daemon is updated that binary will be reinstalled. If you are concerned about saving resources because of not having much ram you should use a desktop environment that is more lightweight such as Xfce4.
 
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sam444

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Well, to be honest, these are just experiments that I like to do.

Not that I have a real need to save that RAM but by doing those experiments I gain some experience as a Linux user.

A fresh Linux Mint instalation use arround 1.2 gigs of RAM and by freeing some of that memory makes me feel that I won some experience.
According to your System Monitor you have a quad core CPU and 16GB of Ram, so why would you worry about using 1.2GB of Ram ?

I have a quad core CPU and 16GB of Ram and have never used half even while running a VM with 6GB of Ram at the same time, so don't worry.
 

Adrian1980

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I’m sorry guys but I really don’t get it.

By changing the default settings in a OS maybe I will broke it.

So what?

Do I’m missing something here? Almos everybody can rebuild it thanks to TimeShift, almost everybody can reinstall it thanks to a pendrive.

If I liked the OS’s that the only option I had is to use it the way they are out of the box I would not use Linux but windows.

Have you guys ever make mods just for fun?

Mine is a mid-high end computer. I don’t have any need to free up some RAM but by doing it I have fun and it worth it just because of that.

I belive Linux’s spirit is more than just “we all hate windows”.
 

f33dm3bits

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The point is if the package, cinnamon-settings-daemon, gets updated your hack will not work anymore an you will have to redo it.
1. mkdir $HOME/bin
2. Creating a file(csd.sh) in the previously created directory with the following content.
Bash:
#!/bin/bash

pgrep csd &> /dev/null
if [ $? -eq 0 ]
then
    while pgrep csd
    do
        pkill csd  
    done
fi
3. Change the permissions by running: chmod +x $HOME/bin/csd.sh
3. run crontab -e and add the following line to it.
Code:
* * * * * $HOME/bin/csd.sh
4. Save the file, now if the cinnamon-settings-daemon package gets updated the hack will still work.
 

Adrian1980

New Member
Credits
61
The point is if the package, cinnamon-settings-daemon, gets updated your hack will not work anymore an you will have to redo it.
1. mkdir $HOME/bin
2. Creating a file(csd.sh) in the previously created directory with the following content.
Bash:
#!/bin/bash

pgrep csd &> /dev/null
if [ $? -eq 0 ]
then
    while pgrep csd
    do
        pkill csd 
    done
fi
3. Change the permissions by running: chmod +x $HOME/bin/csd.sh
3. run crontab -e and add the following line to it.
Code:
* * * * * $HOME/bin/csd.sh
4. Save the file, now if the cinnamon-settings-daemon package gets updated the hack will still work.
Rock on brother!!

Great solution! I feel more confortable now knowing that when the update come I will not have to redo that work.

Thanks, I really appreciate the time and effort you put into these forum and on my query.
 
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