The Linux software that users should know about

LorenDB

Active Member
Credits
1,102
Programs like these are the ones that make Linux the better choice for the average user:

GoldenCheetah - "Performance Software for Cyclists, Runners and Triathletes"
Power Tab Editor - a guitar tabulature editor
Spotify-Qt - a Qt-based Spotify client
Otter Browser - A browser recreating the best features of Opera 12
Aliza MS - A DICOM viewer

These are a few programs that I found while browsing through Github. What programs do you think should be better-known? Post here!

[Edit]
Rules for posting:
Please create a link to the program's webpage/Github repo/whatever, and if possible or practical, include a short description of what the program is and does.

[Edit] For those who simply want a list of software for Linux, here's a categorized TL;DR. I'll try to update this periodically.

Boot
  • rEFInd: A UEFI boot manager.
Graphics
  • Gifcurry: Opensource GIF/video editor for Linux, macOS, and likely Windows.
Internet
  • Dooble web browser: bills itself as the "weather bug web browser."
  • MailSpring: A cross-platform email client (currently closed source).
  • NitroShare: Think of the Warpinator program from Linux Mint 20, but cross-platform.
  • OpenDrop: An opensource Implementation of Apple's AirDrop (see also https://owlink.org).
  • Otter Browser: A browser recreating the best features of Opera 12.
  • Rambox: A communications/webapp-organizing app that supports 103 different services.
Miscellaneous
  • Aliza MS: A DICOM viewer for medical professionals.
  • DragonFire: a free virtual assistant intended to be a main component of the Dragon Helmet.
  • GoldenCheetah: "Performance Software for Cyclists, Runners and Triathletes"
  • Mycroft: an open-source virtual assistant for Linux.
  • Publii: A free, opensource WordPress alternative.
  • Seamly2D: "Make patterns that need *absolutely no fitting at all*"
  • Starviewer: Alternative to the Aliza MS software earlier mentioned.
  • OpenOrienteering: Has a suite of orienteering software that runs on Linux.
  • Tunic: Install Linux on your PC... from Windows!
  • VirtualBow: a bow design program.
Music
  • Fre:ac: A free, cross-platform audio converter and CD ripper.
  • Nuclear: A music player that streams only free music.
  • Power Tab Editor: A guitar tabulature editor.
  • Spotify-Qt: A Qt-based Spotify client.
System
  • CoreCtrl: Allows you to control with ease your computer hardware using application profiles.
  • CPU-X: Like CPU-Z but for Linux. Gives detailed information about your system hardware.
  • Howdy: A Linux version of Windows Hello. Works most places that a password is required.
Terminal
  • Aptly: An apt managment tool for the terminal.
  • bashtop: Terminal-based resource monitor.
  • CoolRetroTerm: Imitation of a really old (think DOS and IBM) computer terminal.
  • PowerShell: How to install Microsoft's PowerShell on Linux.
  • progress: A command-line tool to show the progress of commands like cp, dd, unzip, etc.
Utility
  • Balena Etcher: Easily create a bootable USB drive.
  • Cerebro. A replica of macOS's Spotlight app with support for extensions.
  • Ulauncher: A hotkey-triggered launcher with extension support.
  • Ventoy: Drag-and-drop software for creating a bootable USB.
 
Last edited:


mrcrossroads

Silver Member
Silver Supporter
Credits
34
I love GoldenCheetah and use it all the time for cycling data. It as good or better than the best of the best, web-based, paid alternatives.

Programs like these are the ones that make Linux the better choice for the average user:

GoldenCheetah - "Performance Software for Cyclists, Runners and Triathletes"
Power Tab Editor - a guitar tabulature editor
Spotify-Qt - a Qt-based Spotify client
Otter Browser - A browser recreating the best features of Opera 12
Aliza MS - A DICOM viewer

These are a few programs that I found while browsing through Github. What programs do you think should be better-known? Post here!
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
5,936
I'm keeping an eye on this Thread with a view to making it a sticky, if it prospers, Loren :)

The fact that it has helped draw Albert Einstein back in after over 12 months is a good start ;)

Off to hunt down some useful software to contribute.

Cheers all

Wizard
 

LorenDB

Active Member
Credits
1,102
A few other programs:
  • Ulauncher - a super-handy launcher (somewhat like the Alfred application for macOS) that pops up when you press a hotkey. I use it a lot more than my application menu.
  • CPU-X: Like CPU-Z but for Linux. Gives detailed information about your system hardware.
  • PowerShell: Microsoft's PowerShell, for macOS and Linux. (See also docs.microsoft.com/en-us/powershell/scripting/install/installing-powershell-core-on-linux.)
  • MailSpring: A crossplatform email client. Currently closed source but they plan to opensource it eventually.
  • Nuclear: A music player that streams only free music.
  • Rambox: A communications/webapp-organizing app that supports a whopping 103 different services!
  • progress: A command-line tool to show the progress of commands like cp, dd, unzip, etc...
  • OpenDrop: an opensource Implementation of Apple's AirDrop (see also https://owlink.org).
  • Fre:ac: A free, crossplatform audio converter and CD ripper.
  • NitroShare: Think of the Warpinator program from Linux Mint 20, but crossplatform.
  • CoolRetroTerm: Imitation of a really old (think DOS and IBM) computer terminal.
 

f33dm3bits

Gold Member
Gold Supporter
Credits
5,672
CoreCtrl - Free and Open Source GNU/Linux application that allows you to control with ease your computer hardware using application profiles.
 
Last edited:

mrcrossroads

Silver Member
Silver Supporter
Credits
34
I've been looking for an Linux, AirDrop-like utility! Awesome thanks man!

A few other programs:
  • Ulauncher - a super-handy launcher (somewhat like the Alfred application for macOS) that pops up when you press a hotkey. I use it a lot more than my application menu.
  • CPU-X: Like CPU-Z but for Linux. Gives detailed information about your system hardware.
  • PowerShell: Microsoft's PowerShell, for macOS and Linux. (See also docs.microsoft.com/en-us/powershell/scripting/install/installing-powershell-core-on-linux.)
  • MailSpring: A crossplatform email client. Currently closed source but they plan to opensource it eventually.
  • Nuclear: A music player that streams only free music.
  • Rambox: A communications/webapp-organizing app that supports a whopping 103 different services!
  • progress: A command-line tool to show the progress of commands like cp, dd, unzip, etc...
  • OpenDrop: an opensource Implementation of Apple's AirDrop (see also https://owlink.org).
  • Fre:ac: A free, crossplatform audio converter and CD ripper.
  • NitroShare: Think of the Warpinator program from Linux Mint 20, but crossplatform.
  • CoolRetroTerm: Imitation of a really old (think DOS and IBM) computer terminal.
 

f33dm3bits

Gold Member
Gold Supporter
Credits
5,672
bashtop - Resource monitor (Should also be available through your package manager)
 
Last edited:

james_c

New Member
Credits
22
Thank you for the GoldenCeethat, I just started cycling and it is helpful to be able to monitor the data on a large screen.
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
5,936
bashtop (Should also be available through your package manager)
Not singling out my good friend @f33dm3bits , but if we can have a short description of the software volunteered, that would be helpful.

For example, on bashtop

Resource monitor that shows usage and stats for processor, memory, disks, network and processes.

As Loren is doing. This way readers can focus on what they are interested in, and we can see the success of that with @james_c , on Golden Cheetah.

And welcome to @james_c and other new Members :)

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 

captain-sensible

Well-Known Member
Credits
6,652
can't do any harm. Would it make any sense to categorize them. To me fix , boot tools would come first .if you can't get your system up then music players etc are out of the Window.
 
Last edited:

captain-sensible

Well-Known Member
Credits
6,652
Ha ha well my latest toy was rEFIfnd but you can go ahead to mention Ventoy I can always chip in, but i think the way to list tools for booting of iso would be sort of pros and cons.

Something like:

Ventoy

use on Windows: yes
use on Linux : yes
pro's: Can put several iso's on one usb stick
cons: not all iso's work

Rufus


Etch
 
Last edited:

Mike13Foxtrot

New Member
Credits
113
pro's: Can put several iso's on one usb stick
With MicroCenter 16gb USB drives at 5 bucks at register, I just put ISO's on their own. I can always MintStick them back if they get screwed up. Go a little 2 drawer plastic dollar store desk container full of them. My only problem is remembering what I got on which.
 


Members online


Latest posts

Top