Today's article has you backing up your optical media to .iso format...

KGIII

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It's not something I do, but I know people who do things like backup all their optical media by ripping it to hard drive. This method doesn't work with DRM protected stuff - as far as I know - so you'll still need something like HandBrake for movies and I have no idea what you'd need for game DVDs. I am not a gamer, so I'd not have any idea how to do that.


I do love me some feedback.

Also, it seems nobody reads the entire articles. If they did, I'd almost certainly know. (I tested this.)
 


Bartman

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Optical media from my experience is pretty much bullet proof and short of breaking the cd/dvd disc.

I remember the kids leaving discs laying on the floor and stepping on them and that didn't even break them.

I've saved stuff to external back up hard drives thinking it would be safe and lost it although it doesn't happen often it does happen.

I buy up all of the cd/dvd discs I find in thrift stores often for a few bits here and there.
 

SlowCoder

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I used to do this with old DOS/Windows games. Made loading much faster. Don't remember the tool I had to use to "mount" them like a virtual CD drive in Windows.

Optical media from my experience is pretty much bullet proof and short of breaking the cd/dvd disc.
This would not be the experience of many people. CDs/DVDs oxidate over time, rendering them unreadable. Factors for disc longevity:
1. Cheaper media tends to affix the film on the outside (under the label). On more expensive media, the film should be between 2 layers of plastic, which tends to prevent oxidation a lot better.
2. Environment is a big factor. A hot, humid car will render discs useless relatively quickly. A low-humidity, cool place, like an air-conditioned home, will have them last much longer.
3. Kids/careless people who toss and stack discs on the floor/chair/desk will have bad luck. Discs properly stored in their cases will not be so unlucky.

I still have discs from the mid-90s that work. That's a pretty darned good run, IMO. But I have also seen some of my good discs go bad, even stored properly. Just the way it goes.

I remember also, the process to destroy discs was "fun". Learned to put a disc in a plastic bag and flex it until it shattered. Otherwise shrapnel would fly everywhere!

These days, I keep all my important data on rotating backup.
 

Bartman

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I used to do this with old DOS/Windows games. Made loading much faster. Don't remember the tool I had to use to "mount" them like a virtual CD drive in Windows.


This would not be the experience of many people. CDs/DVDs oxidate over time, rendering them unreadable. Factors for disc longevity:
1. Cheaper media tends to affix the film on the outside (under the label). On more expensive media, the film should be between 2 layers of plastic, which tends to prevent oxidation a lot better.
2. Environment is a big factor. A hot, humid car will render discs useless relatively quickly. A low-humidity, cool place, like an air-conditioned home, will have them last much longer.
3. Kids/careless people who toss and stack discs on the floor/chair/desk will have bad luck. Discs properly stored in their cases will not be so unlucky.

I still have discs from the mid-90s that work. That's a pretty darned good run, IMO. But I have also seen some of my good discs go bad, even stored properly. Just the way it goes.

I remember also, the process to destroy discs was "fun". Learned to put a disc in a plastic bag and flex it until it shattered. Otherwise shrapnel would fly everywhere!

These days, I keep all my important data on rotating backup.
Hell the Wife leaves them in the cd player in the vehicle with the windows rolled up on 100 degree days ain't never had a problem.

I guess I've always bought quality cd/dvd discs as I've never had one deteriorate for any reason.

Seems the ones I find in thrift stores are always name brand and I've probably got close to 500 or more brand new cd/dvd discs.
 
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KGIII

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Who's "nobody", bub? I read it. Quiz me.

If even one person read the full articles, I'd know. I can't reveal how I'd know because that'd potentially spoil the results of my continued testing.
 

Bartman

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If even one person read the full articles, I'd know. I can't reveal how I'd know because that'd potentially spoil the results of my continued testing.
Well whatever method you're using to detect you better repair as I read the whole article.
 
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KGIII

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Well whatever method you're using to detect you better repair as I read the whole article.

You missed the plural. Reading this particular article in particular isn't enough.

But, thanks for reading it. I do appreciate that.
 
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