Today's article was published on time, I just forgot to share it. It's a YUMmy article...

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So, this article was published quite a while ago (like numerous hours ago) and I completely forgot to share it. It's been a hectic day, compounded by fielding phone calls and whatnot (and going somewhere with enough bandwidth to video chat) due to a birth in the non-immediate family.

Then, I had umpteen other tasks but the real point is that I just plain forgot. In fact, I forgot so bad that I thought I had to have an article for tomorrow, not remembering that one was published today.

Ah well...

So, I got a message from the contact form. Those tend to get my attention and their point was legitimate. I mostly cover stuff from the perspective of people using APT as their package manager. I sometimes include installation instructions for the other package managers, but I often let those users fend for themselves/ I let them lie listlessly as though they are becalmed...

And, well, they're right. I do that.

So, for a change of pace, we cover some basic YUM commands in this article. If you're planning to move to a distro that uses software in the RPM format, this might be a good article for you. If you're not, you still might find it interesting, even if a little late.


I do love me some feedback.
 


Oh, and if you subscribe to the newsletter you'll notice I changed the format and am now able to include an excerpt. It's not quite as dialed in as I'd like, but it's better than before (or so I think).

And, if you don't want to wait for me to post these (or should I ever go away), said newsletter will tell you when there are new articles for your consumption.

I'm now in the mood to write an article but I don't need to until tomorrow... I think I'll not procrastinate and strike while the iron is hot.
 
I've read the article, but not used the Whack-A-Mole yet until I checked in here.

You may be aware (but Readers may not be) that yum is largely deprecated in most RPM-based distros, has been for some years.

In its place is

dnf

which is DaNdiFied yum

dnif is used exclusively in Fedora and Nobara, also used in CentOS 8 , Rocky 8 and more.

Our friend Maarten @f33dm3bits will be better qualified to go further with this, and also in RHEL matters.

dnf allegedly resolves dependencies better than yum, amongst other features.

Cheers

Wizard
 
Hi,

yum looks like it dead at the distros i tested its yust a link to dnf as wizardfromoz said. But yum and dnf have some good features like
Code:
yum whatprovides '*/dig'

to find the packages that contains the dig binary for example.

In debian for eample you require to install extra features to do this.
 
Hi,

yum looks like it dead at the distros i tested its yust a link to dnf as wizardfromoz said. But yum and dnf have some good features like
Code:
yum whatprovides '*/dig'

to find the packages that contains the dig binary for example.

In debian for eample you require to install extra features to do this.
On a debian box:
Code:
[flip@flop ~]$ apt-file search --regexp "/dig$"
bind9-dnsutils: /usr/bin/dig           
epic4: /usr/share/epic4/script/dig
epic4-help: /usr/share/epic4/help/8_Scripts/dig
The apt family of packages is quite large.
 
Last edited:
I've read the article, but not used the Whack-A-Mole yet until I checked in here.

It was still available the last time I played with RHEL. Has it really been that long?!?

sighs

I'm getting too old for this.

Well, the good news is I can write an article about DNF.
 
Last edited:
On a debian box:

Also, depending, they may have to install apt-file. It's not installed by default on at least a couple of distros, even though it really should be considered a core part of apt.

They'll need to run sudo apt install apt-file and then apt-file update.
 
Also, depending, they may have to install apt-file. It's not installed by default on at least a couple of distros, even though it really should be considered a core part of apt.

They'll need to run sudo apt install apt-file and then apt-file update.
Yes. The apt family has heaps of programs. I can't imagine the release maintainers not having their reasons for what they leave in and out but I'm not privy to them.

Here's an incomplete list to provide an idea of what's involved:
Code:
apt
apt-cache
apt-cdrom
apt-config
apt-extracttemplates
apt-file
apt-forktracer
apt-ftparchive
apt-get
aptitude
apt-build
apt-cacher
apt-dater
apt-dater-host
apt-mirror
apt-show-source
apt-move
apt-offline
aptitude-changelog-parser
aptitude-create-state-bundle
aptitude-curses
aptitude-run-state-bundle
apt-key
apt-listbugs
apt-listchanges
apt-mark
apt-show-versions
apt-sortpkgs

Just on finding what package a file belongs to on an installed system of debian, this works:
Code:
[flip@flop ~]$ dpkg -S /usr/bin/dig
bind9-dnsutils: /usr/bin/dig
 
I can't imagine the release maintainers not having their reasons for what they leave in and out but I'm not privy to them.

If I remember, I'll ask why it's not included by default when I next stumble into the Lubuntu chat. Someone there might know.
 
My only comment here is, yum is all but defunct.
All of the RPM based distro's I know of use dnf instead of yum now.
The yum command is still there, but usually it's just a link to dnf.
 
The yum command is still there, but usually it's just a link to dnf.

That explains why it was still working the last time I played with RHEL.

In my housecleaning, I killed off my working RHEL VM some time ago, rather than boot it up once a month to keep updating it.

And, yeah, I mentioned it was old and hadn't been updated in ages in the article.

But, that does ease my mind a little. I thought I was going crazy and my memory was broken.

I should probably download one of the related distros and build me another VM.
 
Our friend Maarten @f33dm3bits will be better qualified to go further with this, and also in RHEL matters.

dnf allegedly resolves dependencies better than yum, amongst other features.
RHEL7 is the last RHEL version that uses yum, every RHEL version beyond that it's just a symlink to dnf and with Fedora you have the option to use dnf5.
 
every RHEL version beyond that it's just a symlink to dnf

This is the part that caught me out. Ah well...

Thanks. Today's article is nice and generic. I've just been too busy to share it.
 

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