Ubuntu Studio keeps turning the boot loader timer back on...

CrazedNerd

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I'm currently running dual boot Ubuntu and Ubuntu Studio. I know this is uncharacteristic of computer norms, since according to those norms, there's no waiting and everything happens as quickly and efficiently as possible, but I personally don't like there to be a timer for choosing which OS to boot from in grub. So, whenever I have dual boot, i always set the timeout to "-1" in order to keep this from happening.

I've found on two occasions, that eventually the boot timer gets turned back on, so i only have 10 seconds to decide if i want ubuntu studio or ubuntu. What mechanism is making this happen? I think I'm going to make a cron job that changes the timeout to what i want every single time I reboot the computer...
 


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CrazedNerd

CrazedNerd

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Most likely the grub in /etc/default is getting changed I would look at that and look at the line - it may or may not be there, if not then add it
GRUB_TIMEOUT=?

Try using 0 instead of -1
GRUB_TIMEOUT=0
the grub file in default just has default timer value listed as 0, it doesn't appear to have any effect on the grub screen. I had to change the text in /boot/grub/grub.conf to effect anything, where it says "timeout=10" because that's the time i have to choose.
 

osprey

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CrazedNerd wrote:
the grub file in default just has default timer value listed as 0, it doesn't appear to have any effect on the grub screen. I had to change the text in /boot/grub/grub.conf to effect anything, where it says "timeout=10" because that's the time i have to choose.
Usually to make a change like this to grub, the alterations are made in /etc/default/grub after which the user runs: update-grub, or the command that updates grub. Grub then makes the adjustments to it's grub.cfg file at /boot/grub/grub.cfg, so one doesn't have to touch it. The user can directly alter the grub.cfg file, as you describe, but it will be overwritten next time the update-grub command is run.
 
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CrazedNerd

CrazedNerd

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CrazedNerd wrote:

Usually to make a change like this to grub, the alterations are made in /etc/default/grub after which the user runs: update-grub, or the command that updates grub. Grub then makes the adjustments to it's grub.cfg file at /boot/grub/grub.cfg, so one doesn't have to touch it. The user can directly alter the grub.cfg file, as you describe, but it will be overwritten next time the update-grub command is run.
Okay thanks ill change that as well.
 
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