uninstall package in linux

kt123

New Member
Hi , Let's say I want to uninstall a package in centos. I used yum remove command and it shows the package are removed . However, I still see the files are there. So I understand that uninstalling does not remove the package and files together the way we uninstall in windows. Is that correct?
Sorry if my question is too naive, I am a newbie.
 


kenJackson

Member
No, it should remove all the files. Though I think there might be two possible special cases.

If you've edited any of the configuration files in /etc that are part of the package, I'm not sure it will delete them. It might rename them and leave them. (I'm not sure this is true, but I vaguely recall it is.)

Sometimes there are two packages that provide the same file. In that case, I think the package uninstaller is supposed to call alternatives to reassign the symbolic link to another choice if one is available. Try this command to see existing symlinks:
Code:
ls -l /usr/bin | grep ' -> .*alternatives'
 

kt123

New Member
ok. but just to clarify by files I meant the installation package tag.gz file. when I do ls. I still see op5monitor.tar.gz file sitting there.
 

kenJackson

Member
Oh. No, I don't think any package manager will delete the archive file if you downloaded it. Did yum download it? Is it under the /var directory? The yum clean command removes some files under /var, but I don't know what.
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Gday again @kt123 :)

Just to qualify a little of what Ken has mentioned above

1. Correct on the tar.gz file.

2. /var/cache/yum is where a number of files can be stored after download, for use offline to replace/reinstall but only if caching is enabled. A few are stored by default. The command

Code:
sudo yum clean all
You can also use

Code:
sudo yum clean expire-cache
and other options to set rules on repositories.

For users of Fedora, substitute "dnf" for "yum".

In Fedora yum has been deprecated (basically made obsolete) in favour of dnf, but you can still use yum to some extent. That file storage area I mentioned above would be /var/cache/dnf in Fedora.

Redhat also have this, for reference -

https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-us/red_hat_enterprise_linux/6/html/deployment_guide/sec-working_with_yum_cache

I use Fedora 28 Workstation on one computer, and Fedora 29 Workstation on another, but I do not use centOS, yet.

Our Admin @Rob is a centOS man, and may have more input.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Just a BTW, and not particularly poking fun at Windows, although it is a fertile target :)

So I understand that uninstalling does not remove the package and files together the way we uninstall in windows.
Windows does not uninstall properly and fully anyway, never has. That is why there is a phenomenon called "orphaned dll's" and the like, and there is an industry built around cleaning up what Windows leaves behind.

Ashampoo have the best products for keeping Windows under control, and safely, and they are up to version 8 of Ashampoo Uninstaller.

Just FYI

Wiz
 

kenJackson

Member
Windows does not uninstall properly and fully anyway, never has.
...
Ashampoo have the best products for keeping Windows under control,
Thanks for info on ashampoo. Looks like they have some interesting stuff.

After enjoying the wonderful convenience of a package manager and repository on Linux, installing and updating on Windows seems archaic. They seriously need a package manager. Though they can't do that for commercial apps, because the producers of commercial apps will always want to maintain tight control of distribution of their products.

But I finally found a good package manager for free and shareware apps under Windows. Chocolatey. Once it's installed, you can install packages like this
Code:
choco install firefox
choco install flashplayerplugin
choco install adblockplus-firefox
choco install adobereader
Then, once in a while just do this to check for and update them all, very similar to Linux:
Code:
choco upgrade all
 

Staff online

Members online


Latest posts

Top