Using Kubuntu 12.10 now and watch out how you use FSlint

U

URDRWHO

Guest
I was using Ubuntu 12.10 with KDE Plasma as the workspace. I liked it a lot. Then I read about keeping a clean install. What was mentioned was FSlint and I installed it, starting cleaning things and then it happened.....my installation was broken. I am a newbie and I've been playing around experimenting, having fun with some frustration.

Ok......MBR rebuild, do some partition clean-up. I figured since I liked the KDE look / feel I would install Kbuntu. I choose Kbuntu 12.10 to install on an HP ZV5000 with a 60 gig HD and 2 gig of ram. MS XP is install along side of Kubuntu. I didn't want to use Wubi because I read that it has a small effect on efficiency. Had some problems getting the install disk to not go black after a while. Then I change a setting on the "Other Option" key F6. I can't remember the name I blocked out but it was at the bottom of the list. I was reading that the new distros have the video tied into the kernel, so I thought I was having a video problem with Nvidia. Yep it worked. Instead of the flashy video screen I saw a less flashy screen but at least it kept going to the install screen.

First time I choose to install third part drivers. Everything went well until it got to th3e 68% point, the point at which it was trying to install Broadcom drivers. Ugh! I know from previous Ubuntu experience Broadcom drivers can be a BIG problem. It was frozen install.

SO I do it over again but do not choose to install third party drivers. IT went through the entire process and I had Kubuntu installed. Once installed I went to the additional driver screen and installed the Nvidia drivers. Broadcom was there but I left it alone. This laptop doesn't leave this office and is wired through Ethernet cable. I don't need wifi and I don't want to hose the installation. After updates were run I started to add some misc. stuff and have the personal information manager working. It is a nice little PIM. It doesn't match the expensive Contact Manager I have on the desktop but it is nice for a freebie.

BTW I have learned to always choose manual partitioning and was suggest that it is the only safe way to go.

It runs very, very well on the old laptop and I am impressed with it. It has breathed life back into the old laptop. I won't be using FSlint.
 


OP
C

Cyber-Berserker

Guest
FSlint is a toolkit to find various forms of lint on a filesystem. At the moment it reports duplicate files, bad symbolic links, troublesome file names, empty directories ...
I have never used any such tool. Such a thing might be useful after a few years, but would certainly be useless on a young installation. So for now I would not be concerned with such things if I were you.
 
OP
U

URDRWHO

Guest
I have never used any such tool. Such a thing might be useful after a few years, but would certainly be useless on a young installation. So for now I would not be concerned with such things if I were you.

Agree 1000%.
 
OP
A

arochester

Guest
Never use cleaning applications
2. With cleaning applications like Computer Janitor or Bleachbit, you easily destroy more than you want. You can't trust them, because before you know it, they remove too much and damage the system.

Besides, they are useless. Linux hardly experiences any pollution. So cleaning is superfluous. You may at most win a couple of hundreds of megabytes disk space, at an unacceptably high risk of damage. Should you wish to clean up a bit anyway, then this is a safe way.
https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/fatalmistakes#TOC-Never-use-cleaning-applications
 
OP
L

labrat

Guest
arochester is spot on. "cleaning applications" are just a con trick windows-like thing. In windows, most of these cleaning apps only clean up temporary files, the registry and browser caches anyway. Useless for GNU/Linux or any *nix users.
 
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