Virtual Terminals

Rob

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One of the coolest things that Linux has to offer is the concept of virtual terminals. Back in the days of MS-DOS, one program could only be run by one user at a time. Linux in non-graphics mode may resemble MS-DOS somewhat, but that's where the similarities end. Linux is a true multi-tasking, multi-user system. Unlike MS-DOS, you can work as more than one user with more than one program at a time

The ALT-F keys

Let's say, if you were working as a user, 'bob' for example, and you found that you needed to do something as 'root'. You wouldn't have to shutdown the program you were working with. You could just press ALT-F2 and Linux will prompt you to login as a different user, in this case, 'root'. You'd just type the root password and then you can do stuff as 'root'. Pretty cool, wouldn't you say?

The combination of ALT, plus the F keys will allow you to login as a different user, or as the same user, but to run a different program. All you then need to do is type: 'exit' when your finished, and then press ALT-F1 again to get back to your original terminal .

A preview of virtual terminals in X-window

It's true that the 1990's brought us the era of the graphic user interface, popularized by Macintosh and Microsoft Windows. This gave us the opportunity to have various programs running at the same time. The X-window system of Linux will let you do this as well, but then we can add the concept of multi-user to it.

If you've been experimenting with your windows manager already, you might want to try one more thing. The combination CRL-ALT-F6 will get you out of your windows manager momentarily so you can login as a different user. Pressing ALT-F7 will get you back to your windows manager again. We'll mention this again in the lesson on X-window.
 


Ujjwal Biswas

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If you've been experimenting with your windows manager already, you might want to try one more thing. The combination CRL-ALT-F6 will get you out of your windows manager momentarily so you can login as a different user. Pressing ALT-F7 will get you back to your windows manager again. We'll mention this again in the lesson on X-window.
I liked this one, very cool actually;)
 

Nandan

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I'm a new Linux user. A friend of mine installed linux mint 18.3 version in my computer. I'm not able to anything using this OS. Is there any step by step tutorial as I can learn it?
 

atanere

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I'm a new Linux user. A friend of mine installed linux mint 18.3 version in my computer. I'm not able to anything using this OS. Is there any step by step tutorial as I can learn it?
Hi @Nandan, and welcome! Please open up a new thread to discuss your issues rather than taking over someone else's thread. The "Getting Started" forum would be a good place (https://www.linux.org/forums/getting-started.148/). We will do our best to help you begin to understand Linux Mint.

Cheers
 

atanere

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Alt-and function switch 2 lowers my volume and nothing else happens
Are you sure that isn't the "Fn" key + F2 to control volume?

Some of the key combinations may be a little outdated, or may be used differently by different distros. I'm using Linux Mint, and CNTL-ALT-F1 opens a new terminal window at tty1, or CNTL-ALT-F2 opens a new terminal window at tty2. I then have to hit CNTL-ALT-F7 to get back to the GUI screen I was working with.

Cheers
 

dcbrown73

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I'm a new Linux user. A friend of mine installed linux mint 18.3 version in my computer. I'm not able to anything using this OS. Is there any step by step tutorial as I can learn it?
What @atanere said about your question.

Also, a step-by-step tutorial for Linux like asking "What can a human accomplish". Almost anything! It's best to start with a more refined question like. "How do I do <insert action here>". This will give the forum an idea of what you're actually wanting to do.

As we recently stated in the How long have you been using Linux thread. Even after 20+ years. We are still learning things about Linux. (in some cases, relearning them if you haven't used said program, action in a very long time)

Welcome to Linux,
Dave
 
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