What is the best preparation? , Install

I decided to install Parrot OS again
Basic setting
My device was slow
Although the specifications are good
What is the best preparation? , Install
Here are the specifications of my device
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KGIII

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What do you mean by 'what is the best preparation'? The best prep is to just install it by itself on its own hard drive.

Just let the installer do the work. Pick install, then install with GTK GUI, and follow the prompts. (That's what it was the last time I installed it, though it has been a while I doubt it has changed much.)
 

KGIII

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Parrot has an install option. If you're running it live, it's generally considered more secure, it's naturally going to run slower than it will run if it's installed. However, there's a finite value for security and you're probably (nothing personal) not all that 'rich' a target. Unless you're keeping nation-state secrets, you need to decide how much security is worth the effort.

At one end, there's zero security - which is just plain silly but we're expressing it for completeness.

At the other end, there's complete security - which means not using a computer at all.

Somewhere between those two extremes is where you need to pick a spot. Installing the OS will make it run much faster and not alter the security all that much so long as you continue to keep security in mind.
 
You are talking to him as if I was a terrorist
Parrot has an install option. If you're running it live, it's generally considered more secure, it's naturally going to run slower than it will run if it's installed. However, there's a finite value for security and you're probably (nothing personal) not all that 'rich' a target. Unless you're keeping nation-state secrets, you need to decide how much security is worth the effort.

At one end, there's zero security - which is just plain silly but we're expressing it for completeness.

At the other end, there's complete security - which means not using a computer at all.

Somewhere between those two extremes is where you need to pick a spot. Installing the OS will make it run much faster and not alter the security all that much so long as you continue to keep security in mind.
You are talking to him as if I was a terrorist :oops:
 

KGIII

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Go with the first one - use the entire disk. Let the installer take care of it all.

And, no, I'm not talking to you as though you're a terrorist, merely explaining the two polar opposites of security. Nothing is completely secure (on a computer), and it never will be.
 

jglen490

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Is there some reason that you have a separate ext4 /boot directory?
 

KGIII

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I probably would have made /boot larger.

Well, no... I would have done it all on one partition, that way you never have to worry about some partitions running out of space - just the whole thing running out of space. If I were then going to break it down into smaller partitions, I'd have made sure to keep /home separate.

But, that may work. You may find /boot fills up and you'll need to do some messing around to get more space for it.
 

jglen490

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Yeah, I always keep /home separate (and usually a SWAP partition), with everything else under /
 

KGIII

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That should work just fine for a new person using Linux.

Get used to things with as few hassles as possible and then start examining advanced configurations. It's a learning process and it won't be all that long before you're fluent in all-things-Linux, or at least the things you need.
 

KGIII

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You may need to use a partition manager from a live USB instance to wipe the existing partitions from the drive to create just one single, unified partition - preferably in ext4.

You should be able to Google all these things. I don't mind answering - but it'd be a heck of a lot faster for you.

If I could do it for you, I would.
 
You may need to use a partition manager from a live USB instance to wipe the existing partitions from the drive to create just one single, unified partition - preferably in ext4.

You should be able to Google all these things. I don't mind answering - but it'd be a heck of a lot faster for you.

If I could do it for you, I would.
Can you access my device?
To do for you
 

Nelson Muntz

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