What machine to go with?

Trynna3

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Hello, a newbie here. I haven't done a scratch with Linux yet and having a brief search on the forum I haven't seen any recommendations, or minimum requirements, for a newbie like me to pick a machine to run Linux on. Is there such a thing or it runs on anything? I have noticed that Lenovo Thinkpad are quite praised among Linux folks. Consulting the chat bot (GPT) it warns about a motherboard compatibility, but that was before I reminded it that I was still in the Thinkpad waters. The bot seems to have memory issues and overthinks stuff sometimes a bit.
Is Intel or AMD processor better, like Ryzen 5 or 7 I have seen quite common on the web?
TIA.
 


if you want it to work I suggest looking at Ubuntu, Fedora, Mint as your more likely choices. I prefer Fedora myself. As to the equipment you can choose just about anything that is not a chromebook. Try to get something with 8G RAM and quad core processor as a minimum. That pretty much covers almost anything. I would try to avoid NVidia graphic cards as they do work but not all get good support and that is in process of changing. Otherwise yes it pretty much works on anything. There are exceptions where a company locked the computer to only windows but they are not common.

So pick up a nice dell optiplex (very stable for anything) and get your linux on.
 
Thanks for the insights. I am more into a laptop machine at this moment, to be mobile. Optiplex is showing me only desktop versions.
I'll take a note for no NVidia graphics and no Chromebook.
A Linux guy on youtube was bashing Ubuntu today, that it acted like Windows, stopping him switching off his machine for some updates :D
I am a little better than average PC user (managed extending the recovery partition when Windows failed to update itself) but that was probably the most advanced step from me back then. But I can learn.
 
Thanks for the insights. I am more into a laptop machine at this moment, to be mobile. Optiplex is showing me only desktop versions.
I'll take a note for no NVidia graphics and no Chromebook.
A Linux guy on youtube was bashing Ubuntu today, that it acted like Windows, stopping him switching off his machine for some updates :D
I am a little better than average PC user (managed extending the recovery partition when Windows failed to update itself) but that was probably the most advanced step from me back then. But I can learn.
If you want a laptop I have great luck with the HP elitebooks. Just know that the fingerprint reader is not supported yet.
 
If you want a laptop I have great luck with the HP elitebooks. Just know that the fingerprint reader is not supported yet.
I see. Do elitebooks have gloss screen or matt? I want matt. And now thinking, having a sense of security with my desktop setting and a Pro, HP Surestart would be good for dual boot if I was to retain Win11. Not sure how other brands have their UEFI protected, but HP are promoting themselves as pioneers on the market for having self healing and encrypted copy of BIOS. One cannot have enough protection in the cyber space these days.
 
I see. Do elitebooks have gloss screen or matt? I want matt. And now thinking, having a sense of security with my desktop setting and a Pro, HP Surestart would be good for dual boot if I was to retain Win11. Not sure how other brands have their UEFI protected, but HP are promoting themselves as pioneers on the market for having self healing and encrypted copy of BIOS. One cannot have enough protection in the cyber space these days.
as a beginner I suggest not doing dual boot. And if you want dual boot I suggest a desktop so each OS can have its own drive and that eliminates so many problems with the multi boot world. Dual boot is full of many many wonderful problems mostly caused by windows updates.
 
as a beginner I suggest not doing dual boot. And if you want dual boot I suggest a desktop so each OS can have its own drive and that eliminates so many problems with the multi boot world. Dual boot is full of many many wonderful problems mostly caused by windows updates.
OK, so basically any compatible machine for just Linux itself to begin with. Win11 can come later. I have AIO, not sure there would be space for another hard drive in it and it can handle Win11 (or so it says, some had issues with not being able to upgrade to further version of Win11, something with TPM or what it was). I need Windows for work, but for my personal use and to take an adventure with a middle finger towards Microsoft I want to try Linux, too. Can some laptops have two drives?
 
OK, so basically any compatible machine for just Linux itself to begin with. Win11 can come later. I have AIO, not sure there would be space for another hard drive in it and it can handle Win11 (or so it says, some had issues with not being able to upgrade to further version of Win11, something with TPM or what it was). I need Windows for work, but for my personal use and to take an adventure with a middle finger towards Microsoft I want to try Linux, too. Can some laptops have two drives?
Some laptops have 2 drive bays but not many. as for the AIO it will fit 2 ssd's and I sell adapters to put 2 SSD in the regular HDD spot. Long as you can plug it in. I make the adapters here with a 3d printer and I will give the design if you can print it.
 
Some laptops have 2 drive bays but not many. as for the AIO it will fit 2 ssd's and I sell adapters to put 2 SSD in the regular HDD spot. Long as you can plug it in. I make the adapters here with a 3d printer and I will give the design if you can print it.
Oh, that's sweet from you, but I don't do 3d printing, never done that. Many years ago I managed to swap a HDD in my old Asus laptop and that was all I have ever attempted to change in guts of any computer, after being shown by my other half how to do it. Well, the AIO is out of warranty, I could have a look, but I would have no idea what I am looking at and what is what. I was buying some external hard discs for backing up and I saw on Crucial having various hard drives, including those that go inside, but that's all I know in this aspect.
 
Oh, that's sweet from you, but I don't do 3d printing, never done that. Many years ago I managed to swap a HDD in my old Asus laptop and that was all I have ever attempted to change in guts of any computer, after being shown by my other half how to do it. Well, the AIO is out of warranty, I could have a look, but I would have no idea what I am looking at and what is what. I was buying some external hard discs for backing up and I saw on Crucial having various hard drives, including those that go inside, but that's all I know in this aspect.
Only problem with the AIO is they have no place to put expansion cards in. I forgot that you would want that to control the dual boot. But you can still do it without the card but more complicated. In that case you look at the drive and trace the wire to where it plugs into the system board, then if there is another plug there to use, you are set. Sometimes we unplug the DVD and use that one but then no working DVD.
 
Welcome to the Forum.
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Laptops are not my thing...my Laptop is 12 years old but runs Linux mint Cinnamon 21.1 just fine...most likely my last Laptop too.
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Only problem with the AIO is they have no place to put expansion cards in. I forgot that you would want that to control the dual boot. But you can still do it without the card but more complicated. In that case you look at the drive and trace the wire to where it plugs into the system board, then if there is another plug there to use, you are set. Sometimes we unplug the DVD and use that one but then no working DVD.
That is too technical for me. I'll probably have two machines, one for each OS.
Thanks for the brains. I'll be back :)
 
I haven't seen any recommendations, or minimum requirements, for a newbie like me to pick a machine to run Linux on.
Its now morning, did you read the link in my previous post?
now to expand.
the more popular brands among Linux users are Dell and Lenovo, from experience Media star [MSI] and ASUS are probably among the worse for compatibility problems,
Depending on what your intended use, any machine with an Intel "T" series CPU and 4 gb ram will run any distribution you fancy for daily computing [too slow for gaming] my own laptop is a now 15 yr old Insperon of that specification, and I run 2 main distributions, Mint LMDE6 is my primary and Parrotsec is my secondary OS,
I normally would recommend a machine of 3 yrs old o up to say 10 yrs old, as all the necessary drivers are available and well proven.[not keen on I3 series under powered]
 
Its now morning, did you read the link in my previous post?
now to expand.
the more popular brands among Linux users are Dell and Lenovo, from experience Media star [MSI] and ASUS are probably among the worse for compatibility problems,
Depending on what your intended use, any machine with an Intel "T" series CPU and 4 gb ram will run any distribution you fancy for daily computing [too slow for gaming] my own laptop is a now 15 yr old Insperon of that specification, and I run 2 main distributions, Mint LMDE6 is my primary and Parrotsec is my secondary OS,
I normally would recommend a machine of 3 yrs old o up to say 10 yrs old, as all the necessary drivers are available and well proven.[not keen on I3 series under powered]
I noticed your comment but it was on my to-do list. Thanks for the specs, will take it on board.
 
Riiight. Got a recommendation for a laptop HP Laptop ProBook 450 G9 - 12th Generation Core i5 16GB RAM 256GB SSD Windows 11 Pro, now thinking: what if I bought a new SSD drive and put Linux on that one, sparing the original from this laptop for later use if needed? Just no idea how to pick the right one.
 
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HP Laptop ProBook 450 G9 - 12th Generation Core i5 16GB RAM 256GB
has hybrid graphics, which you will need help setting up [one of our gaming members may be best for that] it is not unknown for some HP's also present sound problems [my desktop did] apart from that I cant think of anything that may cause serious problems.
Most SATA SSD drives are Linux compatible, M2 drives are a bit hit-and-miss,[if you have one of these check the one you purchase is Linux compatible]
 
has hybrid graphics, which you will need help setting up [one of our gaming members may be best for that] it is not unknown for some HP's also present sound problems [my desktop did] apart from that I cant think of anything that may cause serious problems.
Most SATA SSD drives are Linux compatible, M2 drives are a bit hit-and-miss,[if you have one of these check the one you purchase is Linux compatible]
yep, just wondering what that 'intergrated graphics' mean when I looked at the specs on their website. Higher in this thread I got it advised not to use Nvidia and I specified to the seller, after which they came with this suggestion.
So you would recommend looking further? I am not too techy in this so I am learning on the go. I don't mind going with Dell after all.
 
In your own words [keep it simple] what do you want to do with a Linux machine?..[and what part of the world are you in?
]
 

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