What type of Hardware is needed?

memeow

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Hello, I am looking to build a PC. I was wondering if there are specific hardware which is not compatible with Linux I have to look out for, or if there's a type of hardware that is needed in order for Linux to be installed? Thanks! :)
 


Alexzee

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Over the last 12 years I have seen folks struggle with Nvidia drivers for Linux.
So, having said that you may want to invest in a GPU designed by AMD/Radeon.

With my last 3 builds I installed AMD Radeon GPU's and my Linux boxes run great!
I didn't have to install any drivers at all. Worked out of the box.


As far as RAM is concerned, you can't go wrong with 8 Gig's or more.
I went with 16 gig's on my gaming rig.

Happy building!
 

KGIII

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I've had no issues with Nvidia, but it's true that some folks do. But, to touch on that, if you're not a gamer then the inbuilt Intel graphics are more than adequate these days. No drivers needed, no fussing about with anything - it just works. My most recent systems have just had onboard graphics and I see no difference in results. (I am not a gamer of any kind.)
 

brickwizard

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I have been building my own boxes since the 1980's and Linux boxes for just under 20 years, there are 2 ways to build a Linux box the first is building it with re-use components you can knock up a pretty good box on a budget, the second is with new components [can be more expensive than a pre built machine] but you are then responsible for what you build, the biggest mistake people make is using a PSU that doesn't have enough spare capacity to run any additions or upgrades you might do in the future, component selection ,must be based on what you intend to do with it [gaming/video rendering/ general daily use etc]
Bwiz
 

Nelson Muntz

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Good links @Tolkem and @Alexzee although the graphics cards refernced on those links are above what I can afford at this time.

I agree AMD Radeon graphics and Intel graphics work without problems OOTB.

I've had my share of problems with the newer Linux releases and newer Linux kernels not supporting an Nvidia proprietary graphics driver.

To be fair though my Nvidia graphics cards and Nvidia integrated graphics adapters are from the days of Windows Visa.

The above being the case a working Nvidia proprietary graphics driver should still be offered and supported imo.

Sometimes the Nvidia proprietary graphics driver (340.108) is offered however when you try and install it if it will even install never works.

I guess that's why all the gamers I know use Windows for gaming and not Linux.

Windows has the graphics card drivers needed for serious gaming.
 

Nelson Muntz

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there are 2 ways to build a Linux box the first is building it with re-use components you can knock up a pretty good box on a budget,
All of my Linux computers are pieced together using parts from other dicarded computers which is why I refer to them as Frankenstein builds.

Linux runs on most any hardware for basic computer use if a user chooses the right Linux distro to match the hardware of the computer being used.

Choice which is just one of beauty's of using Linux.
 

f33dm3bits

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I agree AMD Radeon graphics and Intel graphics work without problems OOTB.

Windows has the graphics card drivers needed for serious gaming.
1. Not always, recently I bought an AMD Graphics card which had just been released and it didn't work out of the box, I had to install linux-firmware-git to get the graphics card to actually work and mesa-git to get it working properly. So that only goes for graphics card that have been out long enough for the firmware to end in the master branch of linux-firmware.

2. Not true, you can do serious gaming on Linux too whether you are using Nvidia or Opensource drivers. I have gamed with Nvidia drivers since I started using Linux and just recently switched over to an AMD graphics card to see if a difference could actuality be noticed. I didn't notice a performance difference but I did find two slight advantages to having an AMD graphics card when you run Linux.
 

Nelson Muntz

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you can do serious gaming on Linux too
What games do you play.

Linux don't run Flight Simulators although Linux does offer Flight Gear Flight Simulator it's decent however doesn't compare to X-Plane 10 / 11.

X-Plane
has a version that will install and run on Linux however is a PITA to install and run.

I don't do Steam or the other game platforms.
The few games I do run I have the actual install DVD(s).

I'm not a real gamer however do run a few games.
I did try Steam for Flight Simulator it was to problematic.

I'm not willing to jump through all of the hoops to make games run OOTB the way they are supposed to.

I didn't notice a performance difference but I did find two slight advantages to having an AMD graphics card when you run Linux.
ATI Radeon / AMD graphics cards have always worked with Linux in my experience.

Perhaps if I could afford the latest and newest computer hardware that is available I'd have better results.
 

f33dm3bits

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What games do you play.
I'm not willing to jump through all of the hoops to make games run OOTB the way they are supposed to.
I play adventure and first-person shooters, Doom Eternal, Borderlands 3, Serious Sam 4 and Red Dead Redemption 2 is what I currently usually play. I've been gaming on Linux since I switched over to Linux and when I started I had to jump through a lot more hoops. The Steam Linux client and Proton has made gaming on Linux easy compared to how it was when I started. I rather spend my money on games from the Steam store so that they can continue to port games to Linux and so that they can continue with the development of Proton and other technology that will make gaming on Linux better.
 

Nelson Muntz

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The Steam Linux client and Proton has made gaming on Linux easy compared to how it was when I started.
Perhaps for the games you run however anything I'm interested in has been and still is problematic.

I rather spend my money on games from the Steam store so that they can continue to port games to Linux and so that they can continue with the development of Proton and other technology that will make gaming on Linux better.
I'm not wasting anymore cash on Steam and doubt if I ever consider Proton.

I'm not willing to waste anymore cash on game platforms that may or may not work for what I want.

For Flight Simulators it's best to just buy the full game on DVD(s) because it works 100% OOTB.
 
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