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Which laptop brand(s) are suitable for installing Linux?

cahlucas

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Hi all,
Soon I want to buy a used laptop to install linux on there. In order to stay on top of possible problems, I would like to know which brands and models are best suited for this. Can anyone help me, or does anyone have any tips for me regarding this issue?
 


KGIII

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Used? Pretty much anything should work, just stick with a name brand - HP, Dell, MSI, Acer, Toshiba, etc...

New? Well, pretty much anything should work - but it may take more work as new hardware may not have drivers readily available. If you get stuff like Intel graphics, that's likely to work without a hitch.

Your wireless device may take some work, so be prepared with a USB to Ethernet adapter, USB wireless adapter, and/or a cell phone that you can tether via USB. This is true with new and old, but older (used, a few years old maybe) stands a greater chance of having said wireless drivers already included in the kernel.
 

kc1di

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I use Lenovo thinkpads most of the time. Dell is also good but certain models are better than others. But most of them can be made to work. Good luck.
As far as used Laptops go I've also had good success with refurbished units from Newegg.com. If that is an option for you.
 

MikeWalsh

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I've always used Dells. As @kc1di says, some CAN be problematic, but these tend to be the newer varieties. I like to stick with older models that have good reputations.....like the late-2000s/early-2010s Latitude models, for instance.

But having said that, most should work without too much trouble. Networking/audio are often the biggest culprits, though even these are usually amenable to 'tweaking'.

All part of the fun of Linux. With Windoze, you get used to everything just working, because drivers are supplied with everything when you buy it. In Linux, all drivers are in the kernel - with very few exceptions - though brand-new hardware is more awkward than most, since drivers can take up to 6 months to be reverse-engineered & make it into the kernel.

You shouldn't have any real issues, as long as you stick with recognised 'big-box' names.

Mike. ;)
 
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